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Copenhagen

The Takeaway

Denmark on Edge After Copenhagen Terror Attacks

Monday, February 16, 2015

Two acts of violence mirror the Charlie Hebdo attacks, which were carried out in Paris just weeks ago.

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Q2 Music Album of the Week

Rued Langgaard's Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy

Monday, May 14, 2012

A new recording puts the spotlight on the late-Romantic Danish composer Rued Langgaard. He died virtually unknown in 1952, but is increasingly respected for his anguished symbolism and Wagnerian gestures.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: NYC Closer to Completing Manhattan Greenway, Buffalo's Main Street Wants Cars Back

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Top stories on TN:

The outgoing head of the Port Authority says "I was burned by politics." (Link)

GM warms to car sharing; will adapt its OnStar anti-theft technology to facilitate personal car rentals. (Link)

When it comes to car colors, white is the new silver. (Link)

(photo courtesy of East River Greenway Initiative)

Virginia begins a year-long study looking at current and projected commuting patterns, the goal being to reduce the number of Northern Virginians who commute by car. (Fairfax Times)

NYC announced a deal that could give the city the money it needs to complete a greenway around Manhattan. (WNYC)

Buffalo wants to bring cars back to Main Street -- undoing the half-billion dollar project from the 1980's to remove cars from the area. (WIVB)

Michigan got a grant to bring speedier rail service between Kalamazoo and Detroit; the Detroit-Chicago corridor also got some good news. (Detroit Free Press)

Virginia's power company is incentivizing nighttime charging for electric car owners. (WAMU)

Montana landowners are suing ExxonMobil's pipeline company over this summer's spill in the Yellowstone River. (KUHF)

A Norwegian energy company has installed 'bicycle care stations' at select gas stations in Copenhagen. (Good)

The Brian Lehrer Show looks at driving in NY and NJ today. (WNYC)

The community board for Manhattan's Upper East Side wants bicyclists to be licensed. (DNA Info)

The MTA is trying to deal with a rat problem at 25 NYC subway stations. (NY1)

Tweet of the day, by MSNBC's Christopher Hayes: "Pro-tip: the best way to cover a mass protest or street action is on your bike."

 

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The Takeaway

Majora Carter on Grassroots Climate Initiatives

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Majora Carter is host of American Public Media show "The Promised Land," and an environmental strategist for the Majora Carter Group. As leaders gather in Cancún to tackle the big picture of climate change, Carter is advocating for "protecting what we still have." She's concentrating on grassroots movements on the ground that have the potential to create jobs and protect the environment, and preparing for climate change in a pragmatic ways. 

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Copenhagen To Open Bike Superhighways, and the Return of the Roosevelt Island Tram

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

More on the FTA demanding repayment of $271 million in ARC Tunnel money from New Jersey Transit in the Wall Street Journal.

Construction company Schiavone, which has worked on the subway stations at Times Square and South Ferry, admitted that it defrauded government programs and evaded federal minority hiring requirements. (New York Times)

Copenhagen to open bike "superhighways," which will hopefully alleviate the "two-wheeler traffic jams (which) are especially regular on the main Noerrebrogade thoroughfare used by around 36,000 cyclists a day." (Grist)

Lufthansa says it will begin using biofuel on a daily flight beginning next year. (Alt Transport)

RadioBoston looks at a new interactive map that shows all of Boston's reported bike crashes.

London Underground employees take part in another 24-hour strike--and say that walkouts could escalate in 2011. (BBC)

In Pakistan, trucks aren't just vehicles--they're art. (World Vision via WBEZ)

Some cities are testing a new network-based approach to parking. "Streetline...mounts low-cost sensors in parking spaces, retrofits existing meters and ties them into a mesh wireless network to draw a real-time picture of the spaces available, the cars needing tickets and how much to charge for parking." (Wired)  One of those places is Roosevelt Island, which may also begin its own bike share program. (DNA Info)

Speaking of all things R.I., the Roosevelt Island tram returns to service today. Just to be on the safe side, pack some lunch and forego drinking liquids 12 hours before boarding.

The Nissan Leaf wins the 2011 European Car of the Year designation. Take that, Chevy Volt! (USA Today)

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The Takeaway

After Copenhagen: Reviewing the Climate Change Summit

Monday, December 21, 2009

The climate change summit in Copenhagen wrapped up over the weekend - and a muted response has greeted what some are calling a toothless agreement, which observers note is merely a statement of intent rather than a binding document. David Biello, associate editor of environment and energy at Scientific American, was at the summit in Copenhagen. He says if you try to pick winners and losers from the conference you'll find that no nation really came out on top. And Kathleen McGinty, chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality during the Clinton administration, says that the White House blew an important chance for diplomatic action.

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The Takeaway

Looking for Agreement as Copenhagen Talks Wrap Up

Friday, December 18, 2009

Climate talks in Copenhagen wrap up today, but will an appearance by President Obama inspire nations to strike a last-minute deal? We talk with Kathleen McGinty, former chair of the White House Council of Environmental Quality, and Peter Thomson, the environment editor for PRI's The World, about what to look for as countries try to reach an agreement in the final hours. 

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The Takeaway

Copenhagen Summit Heats Up in Final Days

Thursday, December 17, 2009

The UN's historic climate change conference in Copenhagen wraps up tomorrow. There are persistent fears that the end could come without a major, binding climate change agreement between the 193 countries. “The next 24 hours are absolutely crucial,” warned UN climate change official Yvo de Boer. (...continue reading)

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The Takeaway

New York Mayor Bloomberg at Climate Talks in Copenhagen

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is in Copenhagen this week to take part in the Climate Summit for Mayors.  Last week, the Mayor passed his Greener, Greater, Buildings Plan, and this week he hopes to inspire leaders from other cities to follow suit. With cities around the world producing more than 80 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions, changes in urban systems can have green effects globally. We speak with Bloomberg from Copenhagen.  (click through for the full interview transcript)
 

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Studio 360

Offset carbon...and cheating

Monday, December 14, 2009

We’ve about reached the halfway point in Copenhagen’s two-week long negotiating bonanza known as the UN Conference of the Parties. One hot topic (no pun intended) is the practice of carbon offsetting. Yes, offsetting is an economically efficient solution, but does it ultimately fail us?

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The Takeaway

Climate: Looking at Copenhagen from Delhi

Monday, December 14, 2009

In the second week of climate talks in Copenhagen, attention will be on whether big developing countries like India will agree to cuts in their carbon emissions. But western demands for carbon cuts are stoking a surprising amount of anger and resentment in India, even among green campaigners. They see the requirements as imperialist and want to prioritize India's economic growth, as one third of Indians still live below the poverty line. So what can we expect from India in Copenhagen this week? The BBC’s India correspondent, Sanjoy Majumder, joins us from Delhi to bring us views and voices from India.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda with Todd Zwillich and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, December 14, 2009

We've uncovered our crystal ball and are peeking into the week ahead with our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, and Jonathan Marcus, BBC diplomatic correspondent.  They'll discuss what's next for health care reform in the Senate as Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) throws a wrench into the works ... again; President Obama's meeting with some of the heads of the largest American banks; the continuing climate talks in Copenhagen; and continuing nuclear troubles with Iran.  All that and Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi getting socked in the face with a statuette.

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The Takeaway

In Copenhagen: Skepticism, Credulity, Hope

Monday, December 14, 2009

Protestors, experts and delegations from 192 countries have descended on Copenhagen to try to come up with a strategies for combating climate change resolution. Developing countries are claiming that emission regulations will create an unfair burden on their development, prompting protests in the streets.  And some experts think that the best outcome from Copenhagen would be if nothing gets passed at all.  We speak with Tom Burke, founding director of E3G, a non profit consulting firm working on sustainable devlelopment; and Bjørn Lomborg, author of "Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist's Guide to Global Warming," about their views on climate change and what they hope will come out of the Copenhagen talks.

The problem that I have with this deal is that it's essentially following the same failed strategies of the last 18 years. It's essentially a lot of promises...coming together in Copenhagen and simply making even grander promises is not going to actually do anything for climate. It's just simply spinning the wheels in the road to nowhere.
-- Bjørn Lomborg on the possible futility of finding agreement among 192 countries about climate change

It's not been the failure Bjørn says it's been. There have been significant reductions around the world from what would've otherwise happened. And they've happened precisely because there's been an international agreement in place. So it's a bit cavalier to dismiss all of that out of hand and all the things that lots of people in lots of countries have done to reduce emissions.
-- Tom Burke

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The Takeaway

Countering Copenhagen Carbon with Kilns

Friday, December 11, 2009

With luminaries flying in from all over the world, the carbon footprint of the Copenhagen summit had worried the Danish government ...but they've come up with a surprising way of making the summit carbon-neutral.  The Danes are contributing about $1 million into a project to replace 20 traditional brick kilns with energy efficient ones, thousands of miles away in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Denmark says the scheme will cut 50,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year, offsetting the fuel spent by the 15,000 delegates' flights to Copenhagen. We talk with the BBC’s Mark Dummett from Dhaka to find out more about the program.

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Studio 360

Art to Save the World

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

This week, 15,000 delegates and 110 heads of state from 192 nations are in Copenhagen to (we hope) negotiate a treaty to address the causes of climate change. It turns out that a number of artists have also arrived in the Danish capital, intent on delivering their own messages about what is at stake.

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The Takeaway

'Danish Text' Hurting Copenhagen Climate Talks

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

Daniel Stone, senior writer for Newsweek, reports on how a leaked proposal from some of the world's biggest industrial nations is threatening discussions at this week's international climate summit in Copenhagen.  (Read Stone's entry on the leaked texts here.)

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The Takeaway

Why California Won't Wait for Copenhagen

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

While nations around the world are readying themselves for climate talks in Copenhagen, the state of California is already negotiating their own international climate agreements. We talk with Tony Brunello, California’s deputy Secretary for Energy and Climate Change and Ingrid Lobet, West Coast Bureau Chief of PRI's Living on Earth about what the state is facing and how they’re staying ahead of the curve.

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The Takeaway

From China, Watching Copenhagen

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

China faces a serious challenge as its representatives head to the Copenhagen climate talks: how to continue to urbanize and modernize while keeping carbon emissions in check. That tension is in stark relief in the southwestern city of Chongqing, China's largest city and one of the fastest growing. Every day, it adds 1,300 new residents – and their environmental impacts. We check in with the BBC’s Quentin Sommerville, who is watching the developments in Copenhagen from Chongqing.

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The Takeaway

Copenhagen Climate Conference Begins

Monday, December 07, 2009

The most anticipated conversation about the environment in years will kick off in Copenhagen today. It'll last seven days: Leaders from 192 countries, including President Obama, will attend at least some of the conference. by. International Herald Tribute correspondent James Kanter joins us from Copenhagen to tell us what's on the agenda there. Meanwhile, climate legislation seems low on the list of major priorities for the Obama administration. Politico's Ben Smith joins us to talk about how, with healthcare and financial reform on the agenda, serious legislative action on climate will likely be a long time coming.

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