Streams

 

Cooking

The Leonard Lopate Show

Seasons Eating with Clodagh McKenna

Friday, March 15, 2013

Clodagh McKenna gives advice about what to eat and when to eat it, and shares tips for preserving the harvest. Her book Clodagh’s Kitchen Diaries includes dinner party menus, monthly soups, salads, sandwiches and vegetable specials from her restaurant; and cakes for special occasions like Mother’s Day, Easter, and Christmas.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dan Barber, Dave Arnold, Dana Cowin on The Plate Project

Friday, March 15, 2013

Food & Wine editor-in-chief Dana Cowin discusses the future of food with Dan Barber, chef and co-owner of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and Dave Arnold, a partner at Booker & Dax.

Comments [54]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Eddie Huang: Fresh Off the Boat

Friday, March 08, 2013

Eddie Huang, chef and co-owner of the East Village Taiwanese street food restaurant Baohaus, talks about pork buns and and the politics of food. He's the author of Fresh Off the Boat.

Leonard Lopate Show: Food Fridays!

Comments [7]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: The Science of Baking

Friday, March 08, 2013

Shirley Corriher, author of BakeWise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Baking, and Chef Scott McMillan, a pastry art Instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City, explain the particulars of baking—from different flours to measuring by weight to the differences between baking powder and baking soda.

Comments [18]

The Leonard Lopate Show

DIY Kitchen Projects

Friday, March 01, 2013

Julia Collin Davison, of America's Test Kitchen, shares recipes for making things at home that we usually buy—like ketchup, red wine vinegar, corn chips, peanut butter, pickles, and cheeses. She’s one of the editors of The America’s Test Kitchen DIY Cookbook, which includes favorite do-it-yourself kitchen projects.

Tell us what you want to learn to make at home?

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Food Fridays with Leonard Lopate

Friday, March 01, 2013

For the next 10 weeks, we’re dedicating our Friday shows to all things food. From the kitchen to the school cafeteria to restaurants to the FDA, the series will look at food through a variety of lenses—culinary, social, cultural, political. The series will include interviews with chefs, restaurant critics, food writers, and will include recipes, cooking tips, how-to demonstrations, and discussions on tipping servers, catering, obesity, and lunch at work.

On today’s show, Chef Tom Colicchio and directors Lori Silverbush and Kristi Jacobson discuss the documentary “A Place at the Table,” about the more than 49 million people who are food insecure in this country. New York magazine’s food critic Adam Platt discusses food trends. Julia Collin Davidson, of America’s Test Kitchen, talks about the DIY Cookbook. Plus Please Explain is all about superfoods.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Food Fridays: What Do You Want to Learn How to Make?

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Our first Food Friday includes a look at how to make red wine vinegar, sriracha sauce and other condiments at home. Do-it-yourself projects are a big part of our Food Fridays series, so tell us: What do you want to learn how to make? Is it beer? Bread? Greek-style yogurt? Pickles?

Tell us in comments section below, and we’ll see if we can include it in a future Food Fridays DIY segment!

Read More

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Deb Perelman's Smitten Kitchen

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Smitten Kitchen blogger Deb Perelman and author of The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, tells Leonard Lopate about cooking at home, making up recipes, dealing with a small kitchen, and fields cooking questions.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Slow Cooking and Fast Future

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Smitten Kitchen blogger Deb Perelman gives some inspiration for cooking at home, even in a tiny kitchen. And David Burstein talks about how the millennial generation is shaping the world.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark Makes Valentine's Day Delicious

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

New York Times Dining Section columnist and cookbook writer Melissa Clark offers romantic and delicious ideas for what to make for Valentine's Day—from oysters to chocolate desserts.

Comments [26]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Melissa Clark's Tiny Valentine’s Day Cake for Daniel (Devil’s Food Cake with Brown Butter Rum Crunch Frosting)

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

I acquired my first 6-inch cake pan when I made the wedding cake for two friends in graduate school. It was a casual affair, a quick jaunt to City Hall followed by a reception at someone’s apartment. My job was to make a chocolate, tiered cake with white buttercream, covered in flowers.

At this point in my baking career I’d never quadrupled a cake recipe, never cut dowels to stack cake layers on top of each other, and had never tried to frost anything more ambitious than a birthday cake. 

But I bumbled my way through it, obsessively reading and rereading the assembly instructions in Rose Levy Beranbaum’s The Cake Bible, and making sure to have a lot of extra icing and big bright flowers on hand for disasters. 

Well, let’s just say that first cake was a good lesson in why professionally made cakes cost what they do. Even my ugly duck cake was scarily time consuming, especially because I’d forgotten to mix the baking powder into the first batch of batter I put in the oven. Then, for all my best efforts, the poor cake was lopsided and hunchbacked, its pristine white icing strewn here and there with nubby black crumbs that I couldn’t mask, and covered, willy-nilly, with slightly wilted Gerbara daisies. The maid of honor said it was rustic and homemade-looking, and I know she meant it as a compliment. Luckily, it hardly mattered. The bride and groom stopped at a bar on the way to the reception, and drank so many congratulatory shots that when they finally showed up, they barely noticed the cake, which all the tipsy guests devoured with their hands when we ran out of forks. 

Since then, my friends have divorced and remarried, and I have drastically improved my cake-making skills (and plastic fork buying skills). I’ve made four more wedding cakes (never my own, by the way) and all were lovely and not at all lopsided, if still pleasingly homemade-looking and rustic.

All this to say that those 6-inch cake pans that I bought for a wedding cake back in my student days have gotten good use, and not just for wedding cakes. I also love using them to bake tiny little layer cakes to feed four to six. Or in this Valentine’s Day recipe, two, with ample leftovers for breakfast the next morning.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Melissa Clark's Oysters Rockefeller

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup diced fennel
Pinch salt
2 cups chopped, loosely packed spinach
1 small leek, white and green parts, chopped
2 tablespoons Pernod
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
12 oysters on the half shell
1 lemon, cut into wedges, for serving

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

2. In a medium skillet, heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat. Add the fennel and salt and cook, stirring frequently, until the edges start to turn golden, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach, leek, and salt and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds, until the spinach is wilted. Turn the heat to medium-high, add the Pernod, and cook for 1 minute, until the liquid has bubbled away. Transfer the spinach mixture to a bowl and let come to room temperature.

3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the Parmesan cheese and the panko.

4. Line a baking sheet with a layer of lightly crumpled foil. Arrange the oysters on the foil, bringing the foil up and around the bottoms of the shells to keep them upright. Top the oysters with the spinach mixture, followed by the cheese mixture.  Bake in the upper third of oven until browned on the tops, about 10–12 minutes.

5. Serve on pretty plates with the lemon wedges on the side.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Cooking, Writing, Reading

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

On today’s show: Melissa Clark returns to the show with tips and ideas to help us prepare that special Valentine’s Day meal! Chris Terrio talks about writing his Oscar-nominated screenplay for the film “Argo.” Jackie Collins discusses her latest novel, The Power Trip. And former Microsoft executive John Wood describes his efforts to build more libraries in the developing world.

Soundcheck

Eddie Huang and Heems on Hip Hop and Culture; Revisiting A Heavy Metal Cookbook

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

In this episode: A conversation about Wu-Tang, sneakers, race and authenticity with Eddie Huang and Heems. Last week, Soundcheck hosted a conversation with chef, author and hip hop-head Eddie Huang and former Das Racist rapper Heems. Today, we bring you their frank and funny conversation about race, food, music, culture and ethnicity – and a live performance from Heems and another former Das Racist member, Dapwell.

Plus: We revisit an earlier conversation with aspiring young chef Annick Giroux, who compiled recipes from some of her favorite metal bands for a book called “Hellbent for Cooking: The Heavy Metal Cookbook.” She joined us by phone from Montreal back in 2010, and we speak with her about how she came up with the idea for the book -- and how she went about collecting recipes from members of bands like Anthrax, Thin Lizzy and Judas Priest. 

The Leonard Lopate Show

Chef Eddie Huang: Fresh Off the Boat to Baohaus

Monday, January 28, 2013

Eddie Huang, chef and co-owner of the East Village Taiwanese street food restaurant Baohaus, talks about his pre-chef misadventures as an unlikely lawyer, street fashion renegade, and stand-up comic.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Melissa Clark on Stocks and Soups

Friday, January 25, 2013

New York Times Dining columnist and cookbook writer Melissa Clark talks stocks: How to make them and how to use them to make soups and stews.

Comments [28]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Melissa Clark's Basic Chicken Stock

Friday, January 25, 2013

Yields 2–3 quarts

 

3 1/2–5 pounds chicken bones, parts, or leftover carcasses (or a combination, I like to use a leftover carcass along with some fresh wings or feet)

1 large yellow onion, halved lengthwise

2 carrots, halved

2 celery stalks, halved

1 head garlic, halved across the equator

...

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Recipe: Melissa Clark's Brown Vegetable Stock

Friday, January 25, 2013

Yield: 1 1/2 to 2 quarts

 

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 large yellow onions, roughly chopped

1 leek, trimmed, cleaned, and roughly chopped

8 ounces button, cremini or shitake mushrooms, cleaned and halved

2 tablespoons tomato paste

2 carrots, roughly chopped

2 celery stalks, roughly chopped

4 garlic cloves

...

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jazzed Up

Friday, January 25, 2013

New York Times food columnist and cookbook writer Melissa Clark shares ideas for stocks and soups! We’ll mark four decades of jazz at LaGuardia High School, home to the nation’s first fully accredited jazz education program, started by Justin DiCioccio. Also joining us is one of its most famous alums: Jimmy Owens. Curator Rebecca Rabinow talks about the exhibition “Matisse: In Search of True Painting,” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. And this week’s Please Explain is all about exercise—and how to get the most out of your workout!

The Leonard Lopate Show

Let the Meatballs Rest: Food, Culture, and History

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Massimo Montanari talks about the phenomenon of food culture, food lore, cooking methods, and eating habits throughout history. In Let the Meatballs Rest, he talks about how humans have cooked over time, the gastronomy of famine, the science of flavors, the customs of the table, and the ever-evolving identity of food.

Comments [4]