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Constitution

BackStory

In Their Own Words

Friday, January 16, 2015

With the American History Guys

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Radiolab

Sex, Ducks & The Founding Feud

Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Jilted lovers and disrupted duck hunts provide a very odd look into the soul of the US Constitution.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Professor Laurence Tribe, The Constitutional Convention of 1787

Thursday, September 18, 2014

It’s not embalmed in a time capsule of amber as though it was not meant to change over time.
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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Lasting Impact of the Roberts Court and the Changing Interpretations of the Constitution

Monday, September 01, 2014

Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe looks at how the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution and examines the court’s recent rulings.

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PRI's The World

The Magna Carta, nearly 800 years old, still influences modern perceptions of civil rights

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

The Magna Carta is seen by many as THE founding document for modern western constitutional government. Almost 800 years ago, a King was forced to surrender power to his subjects. Now one of the original copies of the Great Charter is on display at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts. Host Marco Werman goes on a field trip with The World's history guy, Chris Woolf.

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The Takeaway

The Beginning of the End of Teacher Tenure?

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

A Los Angeles judge has ruled that California's teacher tenure and teacher dismissal laws are unconstitutional. Michelle Rhee, founder and CEO of Students First, the organization that funded the challenge to California's teacher tenure laws, discusses the possible national implications of the case.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Roberts Court and the Constitution

Thursday, June 05, 2014

Constitutional law expert Laurence Tribe looks at how the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution and examines the court’s recent rulings.

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Radiolab

A Decision! Kind of….

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Yesterday the Supreme Court issued their opinion in Bond v United States.

Maybe you remember a while back we made a short about this case called, "Sex, Ducks, and The Founding Feud."

If you don't remember, it’s a story about a Supreme Court case involving a ...

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Upholds Prayer at Town Meetings

Monday, May 05, 2014

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that public meetings can include an opening prayer, saying that the practice does not constitute a religious preference.

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The Takeaway

SCOTUS Upholds Michigan Affirmative Action Ban

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

In a 6-to-2 decision issued Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a Michigan state ban on affirmative action in public higher education. Kareem Crayton, a professor of law at the University of North Carolina Law School, explains the ramifications of this ruling.

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WNYC News

Muslims Challenge Judge's Decision on NYPD Surveillance

Friday, March 21, 2014

The group filed an appeal Friday to a decision that condoned police monitoring mosques and other locations in New Jersey.

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Life of the Law

Bad Constitution

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

With more than 300,000 words and over 800 amendments, Alabama’s Constitution is 40 times longer than the US Constitution, and holds the record for being the longest active constitution in the world. Originally written in 1901 by men seeking to establis...

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Radiolab

Sex, Ducks, and The Founding Feud

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Jilted lovers and disrupted duck hunts provide a very odd look into the soul of the US Constitution.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

Constitution vs. Politics; Humans of New York; Bill de Blasio

Thursday, October 24, 2013

A new book looks at how the principles of our Constitution interact with our divided government. Norman Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute and Thomas Mann of the Brookings Institution explain how our government and governance seem at odds. Then, 30 Issues in 30 Days continues with a look at housing for the middle class. Plus: Brandon Stanton talks about his Humans of New York project; mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio; and a look at Creative Time and the role of art in our cities.

The Takeaway

Remembering the Country's Forgotten Presidents

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Washington, Lincoln, Roosevelt: The names and legacies of our country’s greatest presidents are ingrained in the minds of every American. But what of the forgotten presidents?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Forget the Constitution?; Stop & Frisk Case; Garbage Heroes

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Ohio Senator Rob Portman has announced that he changed his mind and now supports gay marriage because his son is gay. We open the phone lines to hear about how personal empathy shapes public policy opinion. Then, the details of the Stop and Frisk federal trial and what to expect in the weeks ahead; a Constitutional scholar says we should neglect parts of that clunky founding document; anthropologist Robin Nagle digs into garbage collectors and makes the case that they do the city’s most essential job; and how do you share your family story about resilience?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Forget the Constitution

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

The argument over the Constitution is typically between the "strict constructionists" and the "living Constitution" school of thought. Louis Michael Seidman, professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown University Law Center and the author of On Constitutional Disobedience (Oxford University Press, 2013), offers the contrarian view that the Constitution is outdated and that instead of re-interpreting it to fit current issues, it should be ignored altogether.

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The Takeaway

The Unwritten Principles Behind the Written Constitution

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

As Yale Law School professor Akhil Reed Amar notes in the introduction to his new book, "America's Unwritten Constitution: The Precedents and Principles We Live By," our founding documents consist of only 8,000 words. Therefore, our country's Founding Fathers, Amar writes, purposefully structured our Constitution with an invitation to interpretation using outside texts.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Kevin Bleyer Rewrites the Constitution

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

Daily Show writer Kevin Bleyer talks about rewriting the United States Constitution to improve upon the one we have, which has triggered more than two centuries of arguments about what it actually says. In Me the People: One Man's Selfless Quest to Rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America he argues that while we think of the Constitution as a well-designed blueprint that laid the foundation for the strongest republic ever created, it’s actually more of a haphazard series of blunders shaped by petty debates, drunken ramblings, and desperate compromise.

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The Takeaway

Obama vs. the Supreme Court: US Attorney General Issues Memo

Friday, April 06, 2012

Yesterday Attorney General Eric Holder issued a memo, assuring the Supreme Court that President Obama respects the authority of the court to overturn federal laws they find unconstitutional. This memo came after Republican challengers to the Affordable Care Act accused the President of pressuring the Court during deliberations. We discuss the controversy with Jeffrey Rosen, Professor of Law at George Washington University, and Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington correspondent.

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