Streams

 

Conservation

The Leonard Lopate Show

Conserving Digital Art

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Digital technology has been evolving rapidly, leading to conservation challenges for museums whose collections include digital art. Recently, Christiane Paul, Curator of New Media at the Whitney Museum, and conservator Carol Mancusi-Ungaro undertook the restoration of a pioneering Internet artwork, Douglas Davis' “The World's First Collaborative Sentence.” They explain how they were able to restore it, and discuss the challenges facing museums, collectors and artists to insure that these artworks will survive.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The End of the Stimulus; The Emotions of Doctors; Humans and Animals

Friday, June 21, 2013

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke announced plans to phase out stimulus efforts. Reuters finance blogger Felix Salmon analyzes what that means for the economy. Plus: State Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins on the end of the legislative session in Albany; how the emotions of doctors affect patient care; a look at the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas, California, Arizona and New Mexico; and science writer Jon Mooallem discusses his new book, Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Wild Ones: Humans and Animals

Friday, June 21, 2013

Jon Mooallem, science writer, discusses the state of conservation efforts, and our complicated relationship with the wild world.  He is the author of the new book, Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America (Penguin, 2013).

→ Event: Jon Mooallem, Black Prairie, and Wild Ones at City Winery July 29th | Info and Tickets

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

More on the NSA Leak; NJ Senate Race; Education Commissioner John King; Marc Maron

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

We'll continue to discuss the classified information that was leaked by a government contractor. Plus: the New Jersey senate race is now underway; New York State Education Commissioner and the President of the University of the State of New York John King talks about the new teacher evaluation system and the Ramapo school funding dispute; the tables are turned on comedian and podcaster Marc Maron as he is interviewed on his new book and TV show; and Jessica Pressler from New York Magazine breaks down a debate on cats vs. birds.   

The Brian Lehrer Show

‘Brooklyn DA’; Cyber Money-Laundering; Public Libraries

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

CBS has premiered the first episode of a series called ‘Brooklyn DA’, featuring prosecutors in DA Charles Hynes’ office. Legal analyst Jami Floyd talks about the effect the show could have this election season and on cases in the courtroom. Plus: Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s Diane Brady on charges in a new laundering scheme involving a digital currency firm; a conversation about the future of public libraries; and the role of women in environmental preservation.

The Brian Lehrer Show

How Green Will the Next Mayor Be?

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Brian hosted a mayoral "forum" on conservation issues last night. We play highlights with Marcia Bystryn, Executive Director of the League of Conservation Voters.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Nature and the Citizen Scientist

Monday, April 22, 2013

Akiko Busch, writer, essayist and faculty member at the School of Visual Arts, reflects on her experiences as a citizen observing and documenting the Hudson Valley in her new book, The Incidental Steward: Reflections on Citizen Science (Yale University Press). She also explores the role modern amateur naturalists play in the preservation of place.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Earth Day: Making the Business Case for Conservation

Monday, April 22, 2013

Mark Tercek, president and CEO of The Nature Conservancy and co-author of Nature's Fortune: How Business and Society Thrive by Investing in Nature (Basic Books, 2013), says  the profit motive should be all the incentive needed for conserving natural resources.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Boston Aftermath; International Justice; Nature Conservancy

Monday, April 22, 2013

The legal, political, and national security implications of the Boston bombing arrest. Then, Louise Arbour of the International Crisis Group talks about her work and recent news on international justice. Plus: Mark Tercek, president and CEO of The Nature Conservancy, talks about why the profit motive should drive conservation; the rise and potential of citizen science with stories from you on your contributions; and what video games teach us about winning and losing.

On Being

Katy Payne — Whale Songs and Elephant Loves [remix]

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Katy Payne is an acoustic biologist with a Quaker sensibility. From the wild coast of Argentina to the rainforests of Africa, she discovered that humpback whales compose ever-changing songs and that elephants communicate across long distances by infrasoun

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On Being

[Unedited] Katy Payne with Krista Tippett

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Katy Payne is an acoustic biologist with a Quaker sensibility. From the wild coast of Argentina to the rainforests of Africa, she discovered that humpback whales compose ever-changing songs and that elephants communicate across long distances by infrasoun

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Healthy Are the Oceans?

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Fabien Cousteau, a filmmaker, oceanographic explorer and grandson of Jacques Cousteau, and marine toxicologist Susan Shaw talk about the health of the oceans and conservation. Susan dove into the BP oil slick in May 2010 to assess the impact of oil and the chemical dispersants used to clean the spill, which had a devastating impact on marine life in the Gulf and human health.

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Soundcheck

Noise Pollution: Once In Cities, Now In Seas

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Thanks to humans, the world's oceans today are noisier than ever: Submarine sounds created by commercial ships, air guns and torpedoes have become a major issue -- particularly for mammals like whales and dolphins.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Helping Art Galleries Recover from Sandy

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Many art galleries, and artists, suffered severe damage during Sandy, and in the wake of the storm, teams of conservators have rushed in to help them recover, and save as much of the artwork as possible. Jim Coddington, MoMA's chief conservator, Lisa Elkin, Chief Registrar and Director of Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History, and Cindy Albertson, conservator at MoMA and the FAIC (Foundation for the American Institute for Conservation) Sandy Volunteer Coordinator, talk about what can be done to conserve damaged artworks.

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Radiolab

Raising Crane

Monday, December 03, 2012

In this short, costumed scientists create a carefully choreographed childhood for a flock of whooping cranes to save them from extinction. It's the ultimate feel-good story, but it also raises some troubling questions about what it takes to get a species back to being wild.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Jim Sterba explains how Americans came to live in closer proximity to more wild animals and birds in the eastern United States than we have in 400 years. In Nature Wars: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds, Sterba looks at how how efforts to protect animals allowed wild populations to burgeon out of control, causing damage costing billions, degrading ecosystems, and touching off disputes that polarized communities.

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Here's The Thing

Peter Beard and Richard Ruggiero

Monday, October 22, 2012

Photographer Peter Beard has documented the destruction of wildlife in Africa, including the plight of the African Elephant, the very topic of Richard Ruggiero’s doctoral dissertation.  

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The Takeaway

How the Drought Can Help Us Rethink Water Use

Monday, August 20, 2012

Our nation's water system generally works so well that for many, it's invisible. The pipes lay hidden beneath the ground and when Americans turn on their faucets, the water flows at little cost. How can a drought help us re-imagine the way we pay attention to, use, and conserve water?

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The Takeaway

Reconsidering our National Parks

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

While the detonation of the atomic bomb in 1945 brought about death and destruction, the labs that created this bomb remain quiet and peaceful, albeit largely unseen. A bill in Congress may make these sites national parks, upping their tourism value and ensuring their preservation.

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The Takeaway

The Roosevelt Legacy: Conservation of National Parks

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

President Teddy Roosevelt, prior to his political life, briefly led the life of a rancher. The land left a lasting impression on him, which eventually influenced his conservationist policies. Because of his efforts, national parks have become a part of the United States' identity. Today the great-grandson of President Roosevelt discusses his quest to preserve the Elkhorn Ranch, where Teddy Roosevelt had lived as a rancher.

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