Streams

 

Conservation

The Takeaway

The Weekender: Dr. Jane Goodall on Her Lifelong Work and New Film

Saturday, April 18, 2015

In this special extended interview, famed primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall discusses her research and conservation efforts, and her new documentary.

Comment

The Takeaway

Dr. Jane Goodall on Her Lifelong Work and New Film

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Famed primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall discusses her research and conservation efforts, and the new Disneynature film, "Monkey Kingdom."

Comments [2]

WNYC News

Can NY Help California During the Drought?

Friday, April 10, 2015

An expert says it's not as easy as cutting back on foods like almonds and blueberries.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

California's Water Problem

Monday, April 06, 2015

Environmental reporter Mark Hertsgaard discusses the drought in California, and how misguided water and agriculture policies have contributed to the state's environmental problems.

Comments [15]

The Takeaway

Obama's Move to Protect Arctic Wildlife Triggers Fight With GOP

Monday, January 26, 2015

To the dismay and fury of GOP leaders, President Obama urged Congress to protect 12 million acres of Alaskan wildlife, a move that would prevent all future oil and gas development.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Despite Drought, California Officials Ignore Water Regulations

Tuesday, October 07, 2014

In the midst of California's drought, a new investigation finds that some of the officials behind the local water restrictions are profligate water users.

Comments [2]

NYPR Archives & Preservation

Margot Gayle Saves a Clock

Monday, October 06, 2014

WNYC
The Jefferson Market Clock was almost destroyed at several points in its history. Listen to the 1960s interview with the woman who saved it every time.
Read More

Comment

Radiolab

George in New Jersey

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

What if the Galapagos Islands' most beloved creature turned up right next door in scenic Woodland Park, New Jersey?
Read More

Comments [3]

BackStory

Can We Still Call it Wilderness?

Friday, September 12, 2014

With the American History Guys

Comment

PRI's The World

The key to some big endangered species crime investigations is a small lab in Oregon

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Trying to figure out where that confiscated rhino horn came from? Is that guitar made from a piece of endangered tropical hardwood? You might find the answers to your questions at the US Fish & Wildlife Service's Forensic Lab in Ashland, Oregon, the only one like it in the world.

Comment

Radiolab

In Real Time

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The finches of Galapagos are an iconic symbol of evolution in action: each species neatly adapted to its island's environment, thanks to enormous time spans and total isolation. But isolation is not so easy to maintain these days. Despite heroic efforts by the government of Ecuador to control the ...

Comments [11]

Radiolab

To The Brink

Thursday, July 17, 2014

When our producer Tim Howard landed in the Galapagos, fresh from his honeymoon, he had the ghost of Darwin and dreams of Eden in his head. But he found something very different from what Darwin would¹ve seen. With a local election just days away, Tim discovered a strange new tension between the ...

Comments [6]

Radiolab

Resurrection

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Fighting to protect a species is one thing, but what if that species is all but gone -- can you bring it back?  Should you? Or, as Holly Doremus and Josh Donlan argue, have we already changed our world so dramatically that the only way forward is to accept that Nature will never be how it was?  And Gisella Caccone explains ...

Comments [8]

Radiolab

Galapagos

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Today, the strange story of a small group of islands that raise a big question: is it inevitable that even our most sacred natural landscapes will eventually get swallowed up by humans? And just how far are we willing to go to stop that from happening?

We are ...

Comments [78]

The Takeaway

How Farmers Skirt Water Laws in CA

Thursday, May 29, 2014

New revelations uncovered by the Center for Investigative Reporting show that farmers who take most of the precious water in California do not want the government looking over their shoulders.

Comments [3]

Radiolab

Can It Be? Pigeons, Geese And White-Tailed Deer Were Once Rare

Monday, February 03, 2014

Passenger pigeons went. Dodos went. Buffalo nearly went. But here's the surprise. Three of the weediest, everywhere-ist animals we know (the common pigeon, the white-tailed deer and Canada geese) — they almost went too! Everything, it turns out, is fragile.

Read More

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Survival of the Cutest for Endangered Species

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

There are all too many endangered species in the wild and precious little money devoted to conservation. So if you had to choose, how would you do it? Not surprisingly, it turns out that animals deemed cute yield bigger donations. This week, NationalGeographic.com is exploring our ideas of conservation in a series called “Last of the Last.” Christine Dell’Amore, news editor for NationalGeographic.com, discusses how we choose which animals to save.

Comments [3]

Radiolab

How Important Is A Bee?

Friday, December 06, 2013

When bees disappeared from central China years ago, Chinese apple farmers had to pollinate by hand. Embarrassing — people doing bees' work, but then came the big discovery –- a surprise that still haunts the conservation movement. What if people outperform bees?

Read More

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Elephant Poaching and the Illegal Ivory Trade

Thursday, October 03, 2013

The elephant population in Africa has been decimated in recent decades due to poaching to supply the illegal ivory trade. In 1989, a worldwide ban on ivory trade brought a dramatic drop in poaching, and black market prices of ivory slumped. But there have been sustained attempts to weaken the ban, and today, elephant poaching is on the rise. John Heminway, Chairman of WildlifeDirect and director/producer/writer of the National Geographic special “Battle for the Elephants,” and Paula Kahumbu, a wildlife conservationist, CEO of WildlifeDirect, and executive director of the Kenya Land Conservation Trust, talk about the demand for ivory and efforts to protect elephants and close down international ivory markets.

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Pet Etiquette; "Let the Fire Burn"; Tash Aw's New Novel; Illegal Ivory Trade; Cloud Seeding

Thursday, October 03, 2013

New York Times Social Q’s columnist Philip Galanes takes your calls and questions about pet etiquette and how to gracefully handle sticky situations with Fido and his owner. The director of a documentary about the tragic 1985 standoff between the radical group MOVE and the Philadelphia Police Department. Tash Aw on his latest novel, Five Star Billionaire, set in Shanghai. We’ll find out why despite an international ban, the ivory trade continues, and is targeting young elephants for their valuable tusks. Plus, a look at the science of cloud seeding, and how being able to make it rain could help in the fight against drought and crop failure.