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Connecticut

The Brian Lehrer Show

Last Word On The Storm (For Today)

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

We'll get an update from Connecticut, from WNYC's Kate Hinds (on transit), and on how you're all doing. 

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WNYC News

In Another Close Call, Malloy Defeats Foley in CT Gov. Race

Wednesday, November 05, 2014

The two candidates had been in a tight race for months, with the challenger looking to avenge his narrow loss Malloy in 2010.

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WNYC News

Quarantined Yale Student Protests From His Apartment

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

WNYC
In Connecticut, eight people without any symptoms of Ebola are feeling the effects of the state's strict quarantine policies.

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WNYC News

Test Indicates Yale-New Haven Patient Does Not Have Ebola

Thursday, October 16, 2014

WNYC
Officials at the Connecticut hospital say the patient has tested negative for the disease, according to a preliminary notification.

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WNYC News

Helping Hand? Obama Stumps for Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

The president's visit comes as Malloy and Republican challenger Tom Foley are locked in a tight race.

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PRI's The World

This woman's gaming career took off in the back of her parents' Chinese restaurant

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Lilian Chen grew up playing video games in the back of her parent's Chinese restaurant. She navigates between her life Chinese heritage at home and her American lifestyle at school. But it was in the world of gaming where Chen found home.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Danbury Women's Prison Turning to All-Male Facility

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

The Danbury women's prison in Connecticut will be turned into an all-male facility. Georgia Lerner, executive director of the Women's Prison Association explains the plan to relocate women to Alabama and other states, and what it would mean for the Northeast not to have a federal women's prison.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Interim NJ Senator, Prostitution Sting, GMO Labels, Baby Name Advice

Thursday, June 06, 2013

Before the new senator from New Jersey is elected in October, the interim senator may have to cast some votes. Todd Zwillich, the Washington correspondent for The Takeaway, is here to discuss. Plus: A prostitution sting in Nassau County targeted johns; Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian talks about the National Security Agency collecting Verizon phone records; author and former dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government Joseph Nye looks to past presidencies for foreign policy advice; Connecticut passes a GMO labeling bill; and a conversation on the limits of acceptable baby names.

WNYC News

Metro-North Track Inspected 2 Days Before Derailment, Official Says

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

An official at the Federal Railroad Administration says the agency inspected the area where a commuter train derailed and collided with another in Connecticut last week just two days before the accident.

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Transportation Nation

Train Collision in Connecticut Injures 72, Worst in Decades

Saturday, May 18, 2013

WNYC

Two Metro-North trains collided near Bridgeport, Connecticut, Friday during the height of the evening rush hour, injuring some 72 passengers, 3 critically. Train service to New Haven is suspended at least through the weekend, and Amtrak is suspending all Northeast Corridor between New York and New Haven indefinitely.

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WNYC News

Commuter Trains Collide in Connecticut

Friday, May 17, 2013

Two commuter trains serving New York City collided in Connecticut during Friday's evening rush hour, with about 60 people taken to the hospital, authorities said. There were no reports of fatalities.

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WNYC News

Newtown Leaders Vote to Raze Sandy Hook Elementary and Rebuild

Monday, May 13, 2013

In Newtown, CT, a task force made up of local elected officials voted unanimously last Friday to tear down and rebuild Sandy Hook Elementary School on the same site where a gunman massacred 20 children and six adults last December. 

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WNYC News

Connecticut Enacts Stricter Gun Laws

Thursday, April 04, 2013

WNYC

Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy signed a sweeping gun control package into law Thursday, making the state one of the most restrictive for gun ownership.

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WNYC News

Connecticut Legislature Passes Gun Control Bill

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Following a total of more than 13 hours of respectful and at times somber debate, the Connecticut House of Representatives and State Senate voted in favor of the 139-page bill crafted by leaders from both major parties in the Democratic-controlled General Assembly.

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The Takeaway

Even Those Closest to Newtown Are Unsure About Gun Control

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

What do the people closest to the emotional center of the gun debate think of the proposed gun control regulations currently being considered in Connecticut? You might be surprised.

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WNYC News

Connecticut Governor Set to Sign 'Sweeping Gun Control' Legislation Into Law

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

Nearly four months after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. killed 27 people, Governor Dannel P. Malloy said Tuesday he’s set to sign into law what some are calling the most sweeping gun control legislation in the country.

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WNYC News

Newtown Search Documents Yield Few Answers, More Questions

Thursday, March 28, 2013

WNYC

Connecticut law enforcement officials released Thursday search warrant documents related to Adam Lanza and the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Lanza killed 20 children and 7 adults, including his mother, before taking his own life last December.

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Radiolab

The Cicadas Are Coming!

Monday, March 11, 2013

Lurking in the ground beneath our feet, waiting in their burrows for the first signs of spring are tens of millions of cicadas.

After 17 years, cicadas are expected to emerge and overwhelm a large swath of land from Virginia to Connecticut — climbing up trees, flying in swarms and blanketing grassy areas so they crunch underfoot.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

New to Senate: Chris Murphy

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Chris Murphy, newly elected U.S. Senator from Connecticut (D), talks about his new office, committee assignments, and priorities for his first term as senator.

 

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Transportation Nation

To Continue Plowing or Throw in the Towel: That is Connecticut's Question

Thursday, February 21, 2013

(Neena Satija - CT Mirror) When the city threatened to tow all the cars on my street after the blizzard, I went into full-on panic mode. I paid a guy with a snow plow thirty bucks to dig out my car. And there was such a huge mound of snow between my roommate’s car and the road, that we actually drove it onto the sidewalk to get it off the street. And then the city never delivered. We live in the East Rock neighborhood of New Haven — and we’re not alone. All over the city, mounds of snow have reduced side streets from two lanes to one. Driving through them on Wednesday was a constant cat-and-mouse game with cars approaching from the opposite direction.  Check out this guy, who has just parallel-parked between two mounds of snow.

(All photos by Dru Nadler)

Chris Betances lives in the Beaver Hills neighborhood. Like me, he spent considerable time and effort digging out his car. Then the city never plowed the street. He nearly got towed earlier, forced to park in an illegal spot.

“Good thing I was actually walking out to my car,” he said. “And there was a tow truck literally right next to my car … I was like, there’s no way you’re towing my car right now. Where else am I going to park, you know?”

What I liked about my job today was that I could whine to the mayor of New Haven, John DeStefano, about this, and ask what gives. It’s a math problem and an energy problem, is basically what I was told.

“You know what? At some point, we do stop plowing, and we do stop removing snow,” he said. The storm has already cost the city more than $2 million; on Monday, with schools ready to be back in session, he decided enough was enough. “We’ve been essentially done except for emergency and safety issues for two days now.” It took as many as 30 payloaders — a few from the city and from the National Guard, but mostly contractors — to remove as much snow as the city did. A lot of it went here, to this public lot reserved for that purpose:

In Bridgeport, snow is even more of a political issue. Some residents are calling for Mayor Bill Finch to resign, and a Facebook page created this week to that effect has more than 120 “likes.” They say the city took too long to dig them out immediately after the storm, and now, they’re dealing with 20-foot-high mountains of snow piled at many intersections by plows. Imagine turning into an intersection and staring this guy in the face, for instance:

Clearly, the city can’t be finished removing snow with payloaders and dump trucks. And it isn’t, emergency director Scott Appleby tells me. He thinks it’ll take at least a couple more weeks to get rid of these dangerous mountains at intersections all over the city. He also vehemently defends Bridgeport’s response to the storm — originally, forecasters said the city would “only” (ha!) get 18 inches of snow.

Bridgeport actually got more than 31-38 inches. But no one realized that, apparently, until around 10:30 p.m. Friday night, the night the storm hit. That’s when, as Appleby puts it, “the system stalled.” Plow and truck drivers had already been pulling 12-hour shifts to deal with the amount of snow. And the people due for a second shift couldn’t get to work.

Appleby said the city learned many important lessons from the storm: Communicate better, with residents as well as weather forecasters. Institute parking bans and emergency declarations farther in advance, even if it may seem a little premature.

Cut down on contracting, by far the biggest expense, if at all possible – maybe even by using volunteers or other agencies. Maybe earlier parking bans would have prevented bizarre and hilarious scenes like this one:

New Haven’s mayor DeStefano was less forthcoming with “lessons learned” that can help during another snow emergency.

“I think there are things you can learn, but the things you learn may have nothing to do with the storm you next experience,” he said.

Or, the money to implement lessons may not be there. The city could try to lock in contractors in advance at a fixed price to save money – but that usually requires paying something upfront before a storm is even forecasted. Bringing in more equipment and staff means hiring more supervisors – which the city can’t afford. More outside contractors or National Guard members only go so far when they’re not familiar with New Haven’s streets in an emergency.

Maybe the most important thing we need to do, DeStefano told me, is temper our expectations. OK, fine. I don’t expect to find a legal parking spot on my street anytime soon. So I’m parking in the “no standing anytime” zone. And if I get a ticket, someone’s going to pay. Also, I’m going to walk on the street in situations like this, so I don’t get trapped on the sidewalk again:

Follow Neena Satija on Twitter.

 

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