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Congress And Lawmakers

The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 15, 2010

David Sanger of The NYT talks about the Marja offensive and a new jobs proposal in the Senate.

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WQXR News

Congress Raises Federal Debt Cap

Thursday, February 04, 2010

The House approved a measure that would raise the cap on federal borrowing to $14.3 trillion. The statutory limit on public debt is now $12.104 trillion.

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WQXR News

Intelligence Officials Warn of Al Qaeda Attack

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

Officials told Congress Tuesday that Al Qaeda would likely attempt an attack on U.S. soils within the next six months.

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The Takeaway

President Releases Budget with Deficit at All-Time High

Monday, February 01, 2010

President Obama is sending a $3.8 trillion budget to Congress today. The new budget predicts an average deficit over the next decade of 4.5 percent of the size of the economy.

Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich says the budget is a direct political challege by the president to an unpopular Congress.

 

 

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Congress, Toyota, and the Federal Reserve

Thursday, January 28, 2010

  • CONGRESS TAKEOUT: Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us from Capitol Hill with more reaction to President Obama's State of the Union address.
  • AUTO TAKEOUT: Because of faulty accelerators, Toyota decided this week to stop building and selling eight of it's most popular models, including the Camry and Corolla. Paul Eisenstein, publisher of The Detroit Bureau, joins tells us about the recall.
  • BUSINESS TAKEOUT: The Federal Reserve decided this week to keep short-term interest rates near zero. New York Times finance reporter Louise Story joins us to discuss the Fed's move, and how it may help support economic recovery.

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The Takeaway

Public Option Cut as Dems Wrangle Health Care Reform

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

Late last night, Senate Democrats reportedly furthered the effort to get their fractious members to move ahead on reforming the nation's health care.  The deal, as reported by The New York Times, sets aside the contentious 'public option' and will instead expand Medicare coverage and provide incentives for insurers to set up national not-for-profit plans.  For more on the delicate negotiating, we turn to our own Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich.

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The Takeaway

Rep. Eric Cantor on GOP Health Care Plan

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives aren't satisfied with the health care reform bill drafted by the Democrats, so they have written a health care bill of their own. There are significant aspects of the Republican bill that aren't yet clear, chief among them how much the plan would cost. An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office said the GOP plan would insure only 3 million of those currently without health insurance. By comparison, the Democratic plan would insure 36 million currently uninsured Americans. (Both estimates look ahead to the year 2019.) While the Democrats' bill would cover 96 percent of eligible Americans, the Republican alternative would cover 83 percent — roughly comparable to current levels. House Minority Whip Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) joins us with a look inside the Republican bill and his take on the nation's priorities for health care reform. (Click through for a full interview transcript.)

Join us tomorrow when Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), the House Majority Whip, talks with us about the Democrats' health care reform ideas.

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The Takeaway

Rep. Henry Waxman on the Rebirth of the Public Option

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

When President Obama made overhauling the U.S. health care system his top domestic priority, he supported the so-called public option to help cover some of the nation's uninsured. As the debate lumbered forward over the summer, many Democrats said they would oppose any health care reform bill without a robust public option. But when Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) drafted a health care bill in the influential Senate Finance Committee, there was no public option included, in part because Republicans stood united against a government-run health insurarnce agency, calling it the first step toward socialized medicine. As far as the Senate was concerned, the public option was dead. But in the House of Representatives, the public option is back in the center of the debate.

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) has pushed for health care reform legislation to include a public option from early on in the debate. Even though it didn't make it into the Senate Finance committee's health care bill, the public option is now gaining steam. A new Washington Post-ABC News poll says 57% of Americans actually support it.

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The Takeaway

Bank of America Faces More Legal Hurdles

Monday, September 21, 2009

Bank of America may be forced to give Congress access to conversations that the bank had with its attorneys during the run-up to its merger with Merrill Lynch. Louise Story, finance reporter for The New York Times, reports that the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform has told Bank of America it cannot use attorney-client privilege when dealing with Congress.

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The Takeaway

No 'Card Check' in the New Labor Union Bill

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Labor leaders had pinned their hopes on a new bill in Congress called the Employee Free Choice Act. They hoped something called a "card check" would be part of that bill, which would have made it much easier for employees to unionize. But it looks as though Congress will pass the bill without the card check provision. To talk about what labor unions will do without the card check is Anya Kamenetz, writer for Fast Company Magazine. We've also got Andrew Stern, president of the Service Employees International Union, one of the largest unions in the U.S.

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The Takeaway

National Security: Obama's Plan for Guantanamo Bay

Thursday, May 21, 2009

This morning President Obama will deliver what the White House is calling a major national security speech. At least part of his speech will detail his plan to close the Guantanamo Bay Detention Center. But with Congressman, Senators and even FBI Director Robert Mueller lining up against the closure of Guantanamo, what can Obama possibly say? The Takeaway talks to Jonathan Mahler. He’s a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and author of the book The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power.
"It's a diplomatic challenge. It's a political challenge. It's a national security challenge. And it's really an almost impossible situation for him."
—Writer Jonathan Mahler on the closing of Guantanamo Bay

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, May 18, 2009

It’s Monday: time to ask our guests what will we'll see in the news this week. For a look at the agenda of the week ahead, we’re joined by Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor of The New York Times and by Jonathan Marcus, Diplomatic Correspondent for the BBC.
"A lot of people have talked about a train wreck in Israel/U.S. relationships, and that's not going to happen in this meeting. I think there are going to be smiles all around."
—BBC correspondent Jonathan Marcus on Benjamin Netanyahu coming to Washington

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The Takeaway

How to Stop the Climate-Change Bill

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Democratic Congressmen Henry Waxman of California and Edward Markey of Massachusetts will unveil a bill on climate change as early as today. Waxman and Markey say the bill will create jobs, help end U.S. dependence on foreign oil and combat global warming. But the bill is facing stiff resistance from Republicans and even some key Democrats. The Takeaway talks about the bill and the political strategy involved with Washington Correspondent, Todd Zwillich.

Want more Todd Zwillich? Follow him on Twitter.

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The Takeaway

So sue me

Friday, April 24, 2009

Recently on The Takeaway we’ve been following people’s credit card stories and following up on the calls that our listeners have made on the subject. One man’s story really caught our ear. Don Merrill, of Salt Lake City, Utah, was frustrated with just one small aspect of his credit card company—they wouldn’t stop sending those convenience checks in the mail and he wanted them to stop. But after a year of trying, he found a way to make them. He joins us now with his tale of victory.

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The Takeaway

Congressman Jerrold Nadler reacts to possible inquiry into CIA interrogation tactics

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

On Tuesday, President Obama made it clear that he is leaving open the possibility of investigating the members of the Bush administration who authorized the use of so-called enhanced interrogation techniques against terror suspects. The use of waterboarding, hanging from the ceiling, and other tactics could constitute illegal torture and President Obama suggested creating a commission to investigate these potential abuses. The President's remarks on Tuesday caused both controversy and confusion in light of earlier statements by both Mr. Obama and his staff that suggested he was interested in turning the page on the past abuses and moving forward. To help us understand what Congress is thinking about this issue, The Takeaway talks to the man in charge, New York Congressman Jerrold Nadler, who is Chair of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.
"Even the people who actually did torture in the CIA, if they reasonably relied on instructions or legal guidance from the Justice Department, they should not be prosecuted."
—Congressman Jerrold Nadler on investigating interrogators

Did you miss the President's remarks to the CIA? Here they are:

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The Takeaway

New Hampshire enters Senate appointment drama

Tuesday, February 03, 2009

After the dramatic appointments of replacement Senators in New York and Illinois, is the nation ready for another one? President Obama would like to nominate New Hampshire Senator Judd Gregg, a Republican, as Secretary of Commerce. But, Sen. Gregg will only accept the nomination if the New Hampshire governor, a Democrat, will replace him with another Republican. It's party politics at its finest and Josh Rogers, a reporter at New Hampshire Public Radio, is here with all the details.

Click here for more on Obama's cabinet picks.

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The Takeaway

Today in Washington, the Senate will add amendments to the stimulus plan

Tuesday, February 03, 2009

Amendments to the Obama economic stimulus plan will be offered in the Senate starting today. But, first there is more drama regarding President Obama's cabinet picks. Tom Daschle's confirmation as Secretary of Health and Human Services hit a road bump when it turned out that a driver from a friend is technically income and as we all know you have to pay taxes on income. How is this playing out on Capitol Hill? We’re asking Capitol News Connection’s Todd Zwillich.

For more of The Takeaway's coverage of President Obama's cabinet selections, click here!

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The Takeaway

Second half of bailout funds freed up

Friday, January 16, 2009

The Senate has freed up the second half of the bailout funds, which means President-elect Obama’s administration will have money to use to shore up the economy or more specifically the financial institutions. But Senate Republicans wouldn't support releasing the funds without some concessions. Guest host Capitol News Connection's Todd Zwillich has more details.

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The Takeaway

The case of the shrinking infrastructure bill

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

The amount allocated to transportation and infrastructure in President-elect Obama's proposed economic stimulus bill is being crowded out by tax cuts and other measures…much to the dismay of transportation advocates. Why are transportation and infrastructure disappearing? Since Encyclopedia Brown's not available, we turn to The Takeaway’s Andrea Bernstein who spent this week in Washington investigating at the annual conference of the Transportation Research Board.

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The Takeaway

Impeachment of Blagojevich may be at hand

Thursday, January 08, 2009

Former Illinois Attorney General and U.S. Senate appointee Roland Burris certainly is accumulating a lot of frequent flyer miles these days. After heading to Washington only to be turned away from the Senate by Democratic leaders, he’ll be back in Illinois today testifying before the state house committee that is considering the impeachment of Governor Rod Blagojevich. Committee members say their decision on impeachment could come as early as today. We are joined by Amanda Vinicky, the statehouse reporter for Illinois Public Radio.

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