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Congress And Lawmakers

The Takeaway

Brown Wins Mass. Senate Race, Gives GOP 41st Seat

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Republican Scott Brown has won the late Ted Kennedy’s former Senate seat after a heated battle in Massachusetts. Brown handily defeated Democratic candidate Martha Coakley. The win for Brown is a major defeat for Democrats, who can no longer muster 60 votes to overcome frequent Republican filibusters in the Senate.

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The Takeaway

After One Year in Office, President's Agenda at Risk?

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

President Obama completes his first year in office today, and the excitement and euphoria that characterized his inauguration has turned to skepticism and doubt about his agenda.

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The Takeaway

Massachusetts Voters May Determine Fate of Health Care, Obama Agenda

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Today, Massachusetts voters decide who will fill the Senate seat of the late Sen. Ted Kennedy.

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The Takeaway

Health Care Reform Could Hinge on Special Election in Massachusetts

Monday, January 18, 2010

Voters in Massachusetts will vote for a new Senator tomorrow: The two candidates vying for the seat long-held by Democrat Ted Kennedy are now polling in a dead heat. The seat could be the key 60th vote needed for Democrats to pass a health care bill in the Senate... or the key to Republicans' efforts to stymie it.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Detroit and the X-Prize, Listeners on Race

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

We get quick Takeouts on the stories we're following this week: Detroit hosts the X-Prize Competition and listeners weigh in on Sen. Harry Reid's comments.

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The Takeaway

Sen. Harry Reid Sets Off Race Discussion with 2008 Remarks

Monday, January 11, 2010

In "Game Change," a book about the 2008 presidential campaign being released today, the authors report that Nevada Sen. Harry Reid's

encouragement of Obama was unequivocal. He was wowed by Obama's oratorical gifts and believed that the country was ready to embrace a black presidential candidate, especially one such as Obama – a "light-skinned" African American "with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one," as he said privately. Reid was convinced, in fact, that Obama's race would help him more than hurt him in a bid for the Democratic nomination.

Reid's words have drawn a flurry of criticism from RNC Chairman Michael Steele and other politicians who compare the statement to Sen. Trent Lott's 2002 assertion that if the country had voted for segregationist Dixiecrat Strom Thurmond in 1948, "we wouldn't have had all these problems over the years." Here to help unpack coded racial statements and point out those sitting in plain view are Omar Wasow, contributor to The Root, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, senior editor for The Atlantic, and author of “The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood.”

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The Takeaway

The Week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry and Rob Watson

Monday, January 11, 2010

The New York Times' Marcus Mabry and the BBC's Rob Watson join us to look ahead to what's coming up this week: diplomatic developments with North Korea, a brouhaha over comments Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) made in 2008 about then-candidate Obama, and a federal court begins hearing a challenge to Proposition 8, which explicitly denies same-sex couples from marrying in California.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Sen. Reid's Gaffe, Cardinals Top Packers, Cold Weather

Monday, January 11, 2010

  • Washington Takeout: Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich on how comments by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) from 2008 could hurt him in 2010.
  • Sports Takeout: Sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin discusses last night's highest scoring playoff game in NFL history, in which the Arizona Cardinals overcame the Green Bay Packers in overtime, 51-45.
  • Weather Takeout: For much of the past couple weeks much of the country has been shivering as frigid temperatures sweep through, especially down south and in Florida where it has affected crops, tropical fish and other wildlife that have had to be saved from frigid waters. Robert Oravec, from the National Weather Service, joins us to look at how much more of the deep-freeze to expect.

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The Takeaway

Labor Secretary Hilda Solis on New Money for Green Jobs

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

We talk this morning with Hilda Solis, the United States Secretary of Labor. Solis will announce later today that some states will be given federal grant money to help create more training for green jobs.

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The Takeaway

Sen. Dodd Won't Run for Re-Election

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.), a 30-year veteran of the U.S. Senate, will announce today that he won't seek re-election for a sixth term. Colin McEnroe joined us from WNPR to talk about the decision.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Congress & Security, Unemployment, College Football

Monday, January 04, 2010

  • Washington Takeout: When the President and Congress finish up their winter vacations, they will return home to a very different national security landscape.  Our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, joins the show to explain how lawmakers are going to have to play catchup to an evolving war on terror.
  • Jobs Takeout: Louise Story, finance reporter with our partners at The New York Times, discusses an unmployment report due out later this week that is expected to show a drop in job losses last month.
  • Sports Takeout: Nando DiFino, sports writer for The Wall Street Journal, reviews the weekend's college football bowl games and previews Monday night's "Tostitos Fiesta Bowl" between Boise State and TCU.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Bernanke, TSA Nominee, Broncos

Monday, January 04, 2010

  • Fed Takeout: Louise Story, financial reporter for our partner, The New York Times, talks about Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's speech in Atlanta yesterday, where he said faulty regulation, not the Fed's interest rates policy, is to blame for the housing bubble.
  • Washington Takeout:  Our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, explains how, in the wake of an attempted airline bombing on Christmas day, the routine appointment of a Director to the TSA will now be conducted under intense scrutiny.
  • Sports Takeout: Kim Constantinesco is a blogger for predominantlyorange.com, a Denver Broncos fan site, and she joins us to discuss the Broncos' last game of the season and their playoff fate.

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The Takeaway

Insurance Insider on Prospects for Health Care Reform

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Wendell Potter worked as an executive for over 15 years at health insurance giant CIGNA before becoming a whistle-blower and an advocate for health care reform.  He is currently the Senior Fellow on Health Care at the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD).  He joins us to give his opinion on the current health care bill passed by the Senate last Thursday.

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The Takeaway

Senate Health Bill Passed; Road for Reform Still Bumpy

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Trudy Lieberman, contributing editor to the Columbia Journalism Review, and Carrie Budoff Brown, health reporter for Politico, join us to talk about the next steps for the Democrats' top legislative priority: reconciliation with the House bill and keeping their fractious caucus together.

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The Takeaway

President on Senate Health Care Reform Passage

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Jeff Young, reporter for The Hill, joins us as President Obama speaks briefly about the Senate's just passed version of health care reform.

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The Takeaway

Senate Passes Health Care Reform ... Now What?

Thursday, December 24, 2009

The Senate passed its version of the health care bill, but there is still much work to be done before the President signs a reconciled bill into law. We talk with Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News and John Stanton, Senate reporter for Roll Call, about how the upcoming negotiations between the House and Senate negotiations will affect the end result of health care reform.

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The Takeaway

Remixing the Holidays: Sen. Orrin Hatch pens Hannukah Hit

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) might not be the first person you think of when you think of memorable holiday ditties, but you might have heard his latest magnum opus, a Hannukah song called "Eight Days of Hannukah." Sen. Hatch has been a prolific composer for years in his spare time – from Christian rock to patriotic ballads – but calls this song his "gift to the Jewish people." (He's Mormon.) He and his co-writer, Madeline Stone, join us to talk about their favorite Christmas songs, and how to write music for faiths that aren't your own.

Eight Days of Hanukkah from Tablet Magazine on Vimeo.

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The Takeaway

Senate Passes Health Care Reform Bill

Thursday, December 24, 2009

In the moments as the Senate passes their version of health care reform, we check in with Jeff Young, reporter for The Hill, along with Trudy Lieberman, contributing editor to the Columbia Journalism Review.

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The Takeaway

Senate Votes on Health Care Reform Shaped by Filibuster

Thursday, December 24, 2009

The Senate has voted on its version of health care reform just hours before the start of the Christmas holiday. But even after months of tense negotiating, Senate Republicans are still not pleased with the legislation. We check in with Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, to get the latest before the vote.

We also look back at the road to this Senate vote, and just how much this bill has been shaped by the threat of a filibuster. Once a rare form of running down the clock and making it harder to let the majority party run the show, the filibuster is now used so frequently that some wonder whether or not the U.S. Senate is being held hostage by members who delay, delay, delay. We talked with Julian Zelizer, a congressional historian and author of "Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security - From World War II to the War on Terrorism." Former Senate Republican Whip Alan Simpson also joins us to talk about the filibuster's undeniable hold on our lawmakers.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Economic Exits, Aisle-Jumping Pol, Serena Williams

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

  • Finance Takeout: So far, the federal government and banks have done swift work disentangling public and private interests, following the massive economic rescue effort launched last year. But Newsweek columnist Dan Gross says the Fed's hardest work is just around the corner. Gross says raising interest rates and cutting ties to the housing market are tough but necessary moves to truly get back to business as usual.
  • Politics Takeout: Time Magazine's Jay Newton Small reports on Alabama Rep. Parker Griffith's defection from the Democratic party to the Republican side of the aisle. 
  • Sports Takeout: Our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin with his second of top ten sports moments of the year: Serena Williams.

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