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Congress And Lawmakers

On The Media

American Propaganda Allowed Stateside

Friday, July 19, 2013

The 1948 Smith-Mundt Act was intended to shield U.S. citizens from American propaganda, which the State Department has been broadcasting abroad for decades. This month, the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act takes effect, allowing that material to be broadcast stateside. Bob talks with Washington State Democrat and bill co-sponsor Adam Smith who says there is no need to worry.

Andrew Bird - Orpheo Looks Back

 

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On The Media

We Aren't Watching You - Yet

Friday, June 21, 2013

Last week, a bill called the We Are Watching You Act was introduced to the U.S. House of Representatives. It's meant to protect consumers from new technology that could monitor them as they watch TV or play video games. Brooke speaks to Rep. Walter Jones, one of the bill's cosponsors, about why he feels these regulations are necessary.

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Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Biggest Flop in History Edition

Saturday, April 06, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and special guest Will Saletan discuss the immigration reform deal that’s giving Florida GOP Sen. Marco Rubio cold feet, and the new laws passed by several conservative states that widen restrictions on abortions.

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WNYC News

Ethics Panel Investigating New York Republican

Monday, November 26, 2012

The House Ethics Committee says it's investigating Republican Rep. Michael Grimm for possible campaign finance violations, but is deferring its inquiry because of a separate Justice Department probe.

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WNYC News

NY Congressman Hinchey Announces Retirement

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Congressman Maurice Hinchey officially announced that he will retire when his 10th term concludes at the end of this year.

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The Takeaway

SOPA Being Challenged Online and in the White House

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Last Friday, President Barak Obama issued a statement announcing that he would not lend his support for the Stop Online Piracy Act, known as SOPA, citing concerns over First Amendment rights and cyber security risks. Introduced last October in Congress, SOPA would give content providers wide reaching powers to shut down websites distributing copyrighted materials. 

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The Takeaway

What's the Future of Guantánamo?

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Wednesday marks the tenth anniversary of the United States opening a detention camp in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. The past decade has seen no shortage of controversy about the base, both on legal and moral terms. Barack Obama campaigned for president on the promise to close the base, but signed into law the National Defense Authorization Act on December 31, which includes a provision allowing indefinite military detention without trial. There are currently 171 prisoners being held there, and no signs of shutting the facility down in the near future.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: The Budget Deal

Monday, April 11, 2011

Listeners: Wherever you are on the political spectrum, do you feel like your leaders sold you out? Or are you happy with their leadership? Give us a call or comment here!

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The Takeaway

Peter King's History With Muslims

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Congressional hearings on Islamic Extremism in America begin Thursday morning in front of the House Committee on Homeland Security. Congressman Peter King (R-NY), chair of the committee, called the hearings in order to start a debate over whether American Muslims are doing enough to prevent home-grown terrorism plots. Rep. King has a long history interacting with Muslims who live in his Long Island district and some say his relationship with the Muslim community changed drastically after 9/11. Many complain that singling out one religious group and tying it to extremism is discriminatory.

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The Takeaway

Debate Over Congressional Hearing on Muslim Radicalization

Tuesday, March 08, 2011

This week, the House Homeland Security Committee will hold a hearing on what they are calling the radicalization of American Muslims. The hearing, hosted by chairman of the committee, Representative Peter King (D-NY), is tasked with investigating the threat posed by homegrown Muslim terrorists. "At this stage in our history, there is an effort to radicalize elements within the Muslim community," Rep. King said on CNN's "State of the Union" this weekend. There has been an outcry by Muslim Americans criticizing the congressional committee for signaling out the Muslim community as posing a threat to the country. Is it a worthwhile exploration of the issues or a witch hunt?

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The Takeaway

Federal Deficit to Hit $1.5 Trillion

Thursday, January 27, 2011

The federal deficit is set to top $1.5 trillion this year. It's a huge number, but does it even mean anything anymore? Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich says that competing budget plans are popping up all around the Capitol as lawmakers try to find ways to cut as much as possible. The Republican leadership in the House says they will cut $100 billion from the budget this fiscal year. Meanwhile, President Obama has proposed a $400 billion cut over ten years. As the Republicans look for deeper and deeper cuts, the Democrats warn that this could shock the economy back into a recession.

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The Takeaway

No More 'Washington Wives?'

Thursday, January 06, 2011

Gone are the days of the "Washington wife." As the 112th Congress opens, most members of Congress have left their spouses and children at home. For an article released this week, Newsweek spoke with 46 of the 107 new members of Congress and only one of them — Republican Senator Mike Lee, of Utah — is moving to Washington with his family. What does this mean for the culture in Washington?

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The Takeaway

'We the People': House to Hear Constitution Read Aloud

Thursday, January 06, 2011

On the insistence of House Republicans, the U.S. Constitution will be read from beginning to end today on the floor of the House of Representatives. This may prove a fitting overture to what could be a Congressional session filled with Constitutional battles. Is this reading a stunt or a significant symbol of how Congress will work?

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The Takeaway

Rep. John Boehner to Take Gavel as House Speaker

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

With the 112th Congress starting this week, Ohio's Rep. John Boehner is set to take his seat as the new Speaker of the House. What kind of Speaker he'll be remains to be seen. Will he follow in the steps of Newt Gingrich, who became Speaker when Republicans took control of the House back in 1994?

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: The New Congress, Health Care, Unemployment

Monday, January 03, 2011

The 112th Congress begins this week, and with the House under Republican control while Democrats still hold a slim majority in the Senate, many are expecting gridlock for the next two years. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, look at what's in store for Congress in the upcoming days, weeks, and even years. They also discuss the obstacles President Obama's health care plan may face this year: Will the plan as implemented look the same in 2012 as it does today?

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The Takeaway

Census Data Will Adjust Political Landscape

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Data from the 2010 census will be released today, and the results could help give Republicans more seats in the House of Representatives.  For each state, the census data will confirm the total and regional populations, and indicate whether the state will gain or lose representation in the House. At this point, the GOP looks poised to pick up seats in several states.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell,' Repeal, START Agreement, Net Neutrality

Monday, December 20, 2010

The Senate voted to repeal "don't ask, don't tell," over the weekend. The law, enacted 17 years ago by President Bill Clinton, allowed gays to serve in the military, as long as they did not reveal their sexual orientation. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, looks at what's next for the repeal. Meanwhile, a number of economic indicators come out this week, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, looks at the upcoming third quarter GDP numbers due out Wednesday, along with existing home sales numbers, and new home sales numbers on Thursday.

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The Takeaway

House Passes Compromise Tax Package, Senate Postpones Funding Bill, DADT

Friday, December 17, 2010

A lot happened on Capitol Hill last night.

The House stayed late to vote on the compromise tax package that President Obama negotiated with Republicans. Before the vote, Democratic House majority leader Steny Hoyer commented, "There probably is nobody on this floor who likes this bill, therefore the judgment is, is it's better than doing nothing."

And in a major setback to Democrats, Republicans managed to halt Senate progress on an omnibus government funding bill, forcing Democrats to consider GOP demands or face shutting down the federal government. Majority Leader Harry Reid will likely bring a shorter duration bill to fund government through January, when a Republican-controlled House can put its imprimatur on spending requests. Reid has scheduled votes over the weekend to enact the "Dream Act" and attempt, again, to repeal "don't ask, don't tell." Meanwhile, the House passed the nearly $1 trillion tax cut bill despite a loud minority of critics in both parties. 

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The Takeaway

Congress Juggles Tax Cuts, 'Don't Ask' Repeal, START Agreement

Thursday, December 16, 2010

The House looks likely to pass a stripped-down bill repealing "don't ask, don't tell," and will move on to the controversial tax cuts and unemployment bill which passed in the Senate yesterday. Wrangling between Senate Democrats and Republicans over the timing of the START agreement with Russia continues, and the end of year recess ticks ever closer. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington correspondent, walks us through all the last minute votes and politicking, including Harry Reid threatening to keep the Senate working right up through Christmas. 

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The Takeaway

House Takes Up 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'; Senate Eyes START

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

As this Congress's lame duck period winds on, the last Democratic priorities come to the chambers' floors for consideration. With guarded encouragement from Senate centrists, the House of Representatives plans to take up a simple bill to repeal the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, while the Senate considers confirming the START agreement with Russia. Todd Zwillich joins us to talk about the chances of these bills in the House and Senate. 

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