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Communism

BackStory

Cold War Corn Diplomacy, from "Green Acres"

Friday, February 13, 2015

With the American History Guys

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Harrison Salisbury, The Reporter as Witness to the Truth

Thursday, February 12, 2015

To be uppity, to be contradictory, is the essence of the American system of press freedom.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

James Fallows on China's Business Environment

Monday, December 31, 2012

James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, and author of China Airborne, talks about the idea that some Chinese business people and intellectuals, including some with strong U.S. ties, support the authoritarian state.

    Comments [2]

    On The Media

    A Son's Apology for the Communist Blacklists

    Friday, November 30, 2012

    William 'Willie' Wilkerson III, the son of Hollywood Reporter founder Billy Wilkerson took it upon himself to write an article apologizing for his father's role in the blacklists. Brooke talks to Willie about how the legacy of his father's behavior has followed him.

    Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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    On The Media

    A Catalyst in the Hollywood Blacklist

    Friday, November 30, 2012

    The Hollywood Reporter celebrated its 65th anniversary by publishing a feature story on its founder Billy Wilkerson's role in launching the Hollywood blacklists. Brooke talks to Hollywood Reporter senior writer Daniel Miller about the genesis of Wilkerson's anti-communist campaign and why The Hollywood Reporter published this article now.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Life Behind the Iron Curtain, 1944–56

    Monday, November 26, 2012

    Pulitzer Prize-winner Anne Applebaum discusses how Communism took over Eastern Europe after World War II and transformed the individuals who came under its sway. Her history Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–56 draws on newly opened East European archives, interviews, and personal accounts translated for the first time to show in detail the dilemmas faced by millions of individuals trying to adjust to a way of life that challenged their beliefs and took away everything they had.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Big Stars

    Monday, November 26, 2012

    Jack Black talks about his career in movies, music, and his latest role in the film "Bernie." Then Pulitzer Prize-winner Anne Applebaum gives a glimpse behind the iron curtain, and reveals how communism took over Eastern Europe after WWII. And the great Tony Bennett shares the lessons he's learned over the course of his long career, working with everyone from Duke Ellington to Bill Evans to Lady Gaga.

    Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

    Inspiration Strikes After Tragedy: Alfred Kazin on His New Yorker Trilogy

    Friday, November 02, 2012

    WNYC

    Starting Out in the Thirties (1965), the second installment of Kazin's New Yorker Trilogy, had just been published when he gave this brief talk on the genesis of his artistic motivation at a 1965 Books and Authors Luncheon.

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    Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

    Svetlana Alliluyeva's Graceful Defection from the Soviet Union

    Thursday, July 19, 2012

    In this recording from April 26, 1967, Svetlana Alliluyeva, the daughter of Joseph Stalin, fields a variety of questions from the New York press after leaving her homeland. "I feel like Valentina Tereshkova at her first flight into space," she confesses, referring to the first female cosmonaut.

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    The Takeaway

    Son of Bo Xilai Disappears from Harvard

    Tuesday, April 17, 2012

    The son of Bo Xilai, who attends Harvard University in Cambridge Massachusetts, has gone missing. This latest development comes after Xilai was ousted from the Communist Party's inner circle and his wife implicated in the murder of a British businessman. We're joined by Evan Osnos, a writer for the New Yorker.

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    The Takeaway

    Figuring Out What is Going on in China

    Friday, April 13, 2012

    China is having a difficult time keeping critical and controversial comments about the Chinese Communist party from circulating on the Internet. This time the source of the problem is the people of China trying to understand what's going on in their own government in the midst of the biggest political scandal in decades. Jonathan Fenby is a contributor to New York Times and author on Chinese economics.

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    The Takeaway

    Death of British Businessman in China Declared a Murder

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012

    A blockbuster scandal has surfaced in Beijing as the Communist Party attempts to pass the political torch to new leaders. The death of a British businessman in a Chongqing hotel room was declared a murder yesterday, and the wife of Bo Xilai, one of China's most powerful men, is the lead suspect. Michael Bristow is correspondent for our partner the BBC.

    Comments [1]

    The Takeaway

    40th Anniversary of Nixon's Visit to China

    Tuesday, February 21, 2012

    After 22 years of mutual isolation and hostility, it was the trip that transformed the world. From February 21-28, 1972, U.S. president Richard Nixon met with Chairman Mao Zedong and Premier Zhou Enlai, and traveled through Beijing, Hangzhou and Shanghai. In addition to formally normalizing relations between the U.S. and P.R.C., it was the first time the U.S. public had seen images of China since the communists took power. 

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    The Takeaway

    Newly Released Files Reveal Controversy Over Chaplin's Knighthood

    Friday, February 17, 2012

    Charlie Chaplin's contributions to the eighth art are indisputable. His most famous character, The Tramp, entertained millions and has influenced both "serious" actors and physical comedians for almost 100 years. But it doesn't take a film scholar to see that many of Chaplin's films contain pro-socialist messages, especially in those that he directed. In 1952 during the House Committee on Un-American Activities's second series of investigations, Chaplin was denied re-entry to the U.S. Chaplin lived the rest of his life in Europe, and obtained a knighthood in 1975 — despite a great deal of pressure from the F.B.I.

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    The Takeaway

    The Secret History of FBI Counterintelligence

    Thursday, February 16, 2012

    Since its founding, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has grappled with how to balance personal liberty and national security. The bureau grew exponentially in the years following World War I, as the country became increasingly terrified by the communist threat. The fear of communism often served as a guide for J. Edgar Hoover, the man who built the FBI and ran the Bureau for more than 40 years.

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    The Takeaway

    Estimating Chinese Holdings of US Debt

    Friday, July 01, 2011

    China celebrates its 90th year of Communist rule today; but in the background, the nation is playing deeply capitalist games with international debts. China owns a large portion of US debt, but a Reuters investigation shows that they may have more than the Treasury could previously report. By buying up US debt through internationally disparate financial intermediaries, Chinese entities hid exactly how much US debt they had acquired—estimates say it is above $1.13 trillion. 

     

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    The Takeaway

    Cuba Appoints Non-Castro to Communist Party

    Wednesday, April 20, 2011

    Cuba made significant changes to its leadership on Tuesday, appointing someone other than a member of the Castro family to the second-highest position in the Communist Party. Raul Castro was named first secretary of the party, and Fidel Castro was not included in the leadership for the first time since the party's creation in 1965. Are we seeing the start of a new era in Cuba?

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    The Takeaway

    Remembering US Foreign Policy and the Bay of Pigs

    Friday, April 15, 2011

    Fifty years ago this weekend, the Central Intelligence Agency launched a covert attack on Cuba in what became known as The Bay of Pigs. The three day assault, which was carried out under the auspices of a Cuban rebel group, was a fiasco. The rebels were captured and killed, along with a handful of CIA intelligence officers. It was just three months after John F. Kennedy took over the White House, and while the plan had been initiated under Dwight D. Eisenhower, it was Kennedy who signed off on the operation.

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    The Takeaway

    Former Teen CIA Recruit on The Bay of Pigs

    Friday, April 15, 2011

    In the Spring of 1960, the CIA began a covert plan to overthrow the Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro. The idea was to invade Cuba in a coup d’etat. There were already counter-revolutionary forces in the Escambray Mountains. But the CIA wanted a home-grown group. In Miami, the CIA began recruiting among the anti-Castro Cuban exiles and turned them into the Brigade 2506. Trained and armed by the CIA, on April 17, 1961 they landed at the Bahia de Cochinos in Cuba — the Bay of Pigs.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Lost and Found In Russia

    Tuesday, February 22, 2011

    Susan Richards looks at the transformation of Russia after the fall of communism. Lost and Found in Russia: Lives in the Post-Soviet Landscape reveals how the history of contemporary Russia is a portrait of a society in transition.

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