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Communication

WNYC News

When Your Cancer Doctor Gives You ‘12 Months to Live,’ Here’s What That Really Means

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

A prognosis is not an absolute number. Now doctors are acknowledging just how uncertain the course of an illness can be.

Comments [9]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Balancing Hope and Realism in Cancer Prognosis

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Studies show cancer patients retain less than half of the information the doctor gives them in a prognosis. So how can doctors do a better job of communicating? 

Comments [5]

Listen to Lucy

My solution to the anguish of unanswered emails

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

My solution to the anguish of unanswered emails

Comment

Listen to Lucy

How insecurity and preening kill corporate common sense

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

How insecurity and preening kill corporate common sense

Comment

Listen to Lucy

Golden Flannel of the year award

Tuesday, January 06, 2015

Golden Flannel of the year award

Comment

Radiolab

What Do Dolphins Talk About?

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Denise Herzing has been studying the same pod of wild dolphins for 30 years. But this year, things are different.

Comments [6]

Radiolab

Home Is Where Your Dolphin Is

Thursday, August 21, 2014

In the 1960's, Margaret Howe had a very unusual roommate: a bottlenose dolphin named Peter.   

Comments [16]

Radiolab

Hello

Thursday, August 21, 2014

It's tough to make small talk with a stranger—especially when that stranger doesn't speak your language. (And he has a blowhole.)

Comments [60]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Everyday Interactions Foster Debate, Compromise and Healthier Communities

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The more we become socially isolated individually, the more our society as a whole suffers, argues Marc Dunkelman.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Good Ideas Spread

Monday, February 10, 2014

It turns out that like bees, humans leave traceable patterns of information exchange. MIT's Alex Pentland explains how social networks large and small can be fine-tuned to increase exploration and community engagement.

Comments [9]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Social Media, Pre-Internet

Monday, October 21, 2013

Tom Standage, digital editor at the Economist, author of A History of the World in 6 Glasses and Writing on the Wall: Social Media - The First 2,000 Years (Bloomsbury USA, 2013), finds that papyrus rolls and Twitter have a lot in common as he traces the history of instant communication from ancient times to today.

Event: Tom Standage | Barnes and Noble Wednesday 6pm | Information

Comments [4]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Disconnected on the Web

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Ethan Zuckerman, co-founder of Global Voices Online, director of the MIT Center for Civic Media, and author of Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection (W.W. Norton & Company, 2013), talks about why the ease of connecting with far-off places and people that technology allows has not translated into greater interest and attention to the rest of the world, and discusses how this could change.

Do you follow events in places you and your family have never lived?  Tell us where, how and why you seek out information from afar.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Animal Behaviorist: We Will Have the Ability to Understand our Pets in the Next Decade

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

What would it be like if we could talk to the animals, and they could talk to us? For years, movies have played on this fantasy, often to comic effect. But Con Slobodchikoff isn’t just dreaming of talking to animals. He’s actually doing it. His big feat so far has been decoding the language of prairie dogs, which includes descriptive vocabulary words and sentence-like structures. If his work goes according to plan, we’ll all have the ability to understand what our pets are saying in the next decade, and to talk to them in return.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Word Maven Patricia T. O'Conner Sends Smoke Signals

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Following the dramatic election of the pope, announced with a puff of white smoke from the Vatican, our word maven Patricia T. O'Conner talks about the history of communicating through smoke signals. She’ll also answer questions about language and grammar. An updated and expanded third edition of her book, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English, is available in paperback, as is  Origins of the Specious, written with Stewart Kellerman.

If you have a question about language and grammar, leave a comment or call us at 212-433-9692!

Comments [45]

Listen to Lucy

Finally I’ve found some good corporate guff

Monday, February 18, 2013

Finally I’ve found some good corporate guff

Comment

The Takeaway

When We Wrote Letters

Thursday, February 07, 2013

As more of us rely on email, texting, and Skype to communicate, the art of letter writing has gradually been coming to an end. But with the death of letters, are we losing something else as well? It’s a question that Martha Tuck Rozett has seriously considered. Martha is an English professor at the University of Albany and author of "When People Wrote Letters: A Family Chronicle."

Comments [8]

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

The Decline of American Cities: Lewis Mumford's 'The City in History'

Friday, November 23, 2012

WNYC

"Like a stopped clock," the author Lewis Mumford asserts in this 1961 appearance at a Books and Authors Luncheon, he has been exactly right twice.  

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Progress in a Networked Age

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Steven Johnson makes the case that a new model of political change is on the rise, transforming everything from local governments to classrooms, from protest movements to health care. In Future Perfect: The Case for Progress in a Networked Age shows how politics are influenced by the interconnectedness of the Internet and breaks with the conventional categories of liberal or conservative thinking.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Art of Conflict Resolution

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Dr. Marvin Johnson, a nationally recognized mediator and arbitrator, talks about how to resolve disputes and conflicts. He explains how mediation skills work and how they can be used in our daily lives.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: NSA's Storage Facility

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Wired correspondent James Bamford describes the $2 billion Utah Data Center that is being constructed for the National Security Agency. It’s expected to be up and running in 2013 and will house their database for all forms of communication—emails, cell phone calls, Internet searches, and even bookstore purchases.

Comments [8]