Streams

 

Climate Change

The Takeaway

From China, Watching Copenhagen

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

China faces a serious challenge as its representatives head to the Copenhagen climate talks: how to continue to urbanize and modernize while keeping carbon emissions in check. That tension is in stark relief in the southwestern city of Chongqing, China's largest city and one of the fastest growing. Every day, it adds 1,300 new residents – and their environmental impacts. We check in with the BBC’s Quentin Sommerville, who is watching the developments in Copenhagen from Chongqing.

Comment

The Takeaway

Why It's Not Easy Being Green

Monday, December 07, 2009

Most of us know that environmental change is an issue and that our choices affect it... so why aren't we doing all we should to fix things? David Biello, associate online editor for Scientific American, and Benjamin Ho, behavioral economist at Cornell University, discuss why humans aren't more ecologically responsible, and how we can convince (or trick, even) ourselves to change our behaviors for the common good.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Copenhagen Climate Conference Begins

Monday, December 07, 2009

The most anticipated conversation about the environment in years will kick off in Copenhagen today. It'll last seven days: Leaders from 192 countries, including President Obama, will attend at least some of the conference. by. International Herald Tribute correspondent James Kanter joins us from Copenhagen to tell us what's on the agenda there. Meanwhile, climate legislation seems low on the list of major priorities for the Obama administration. Politico's Ben Smith joins us to talk about how, with healthcare and financial reform on the agenda, serious legislative action on climate will likely be a long time coming.

Comment

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda with Reihan Salam and Adam Mynott

Monday, December 07, 2009

Reihan Salam, fellow at the New America Foundation; and Adam Mynott, BBC world affairs correspondent, look at the week's agenda: what to look for from Copenhagen as international climate talks kicks off; what's ahead for health care in the Senate; what President Obama could say in his new-jobs speech on Tuesday, and what's in store for an overhaul of America's financial system.

Comment

The Takeaway

Climate Change Announcements Ahead of Copenhagen

Friday, November 27, 2009

It's been a big week for the planet. Yesterday, the world’s biggest polluter, China, said it would slow the rampant growth of its carbon emissions. This week President Obama voiced his own proposal: a committment to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in several stages. BBC environment correspondent Matt McGrath joins us to make sense of these announcements - what do they mean for a hypothetical international climate change deal in Copenhagen?

Comment

The Takeaway

The SuperFreakonomics Approach to Cooling the Planet

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

The new "SuperFreakonomics" book has attracted some passionate criticism from climate scientists and a community of writers, researchers and scholars for a chapter on global warming. Co-authors Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt reject the idea that reducing carbon emissions should be the sole focus for addressing global warming, and dive into an array of bold ideas for "geoengineering," which would allow people to directly change temperatures on Earth. Stephen Dubner joins us to explain and defend the Freakonomics approach.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Takeouts: Wall St. Pay, Climate Change, Phillies' Win

Tuesday, November 03, 2009

  • Business Takeout: The Supreme Court signaled they aren't too eager to intervene on excessive pay for Wall Street execs, but the Federal Reserve seems to be champing at the bit. Louise Story, finance reporter for our partners The New York Times, explains.
  • Washington Takeout: Our own Todd Zwillich joins us to talk about the wrangling over climate change legislation on Capitol Hill.
  • Sports Takeout: Ibrahim Abdul-Matin looks at last night's Phillies win over the Yankees as both teams head back to New York for Game 6 of the World Series.

Comment

The Takeaway

White House Eyes Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining

Thursday, October 29, 2009

As Congress begins to debate climate change legislation, a fight between environmentalists and industry over a particular type of coal mining is ratcheting up in West Virginia. The Obama administration threatened to revoke a permit to one of Appalachia's largest mountaintop removal mines earlier this month, and all sides are bracing for pivotal policy decisions after decades of controversy. We speak to Erica Peterson, reporter at West Virginia Public Radio, along with Roger Horton, founder of the advocacy group "Citizens for Coal." Horton works at a mountaintop mine as a truck driver.

Comment

The Takeaway

Washington Takeout: A New Climate Bill

Thursday, October 01, 2009

Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us to talk about a new climate bill introduced by two Democratic Senators: Barbara Boxer, of California; and John Kerry, of Massachusetts.

Comment

The Takeaway

Addressing Climate Change One Prank at a Time

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Last week close to a million New Yorkers received a special edition of the New York Post emblazoned with the giant headline: "We're Screwed!" Plausible as the headline seemed, the paper was not the work of the Post staff, but rather an elaborate prank by The Yes Men, a group dedicated to pranking for change. We talk to one of the two Yes Men, Mike Bonnano (his partner-in-pranks, Andy Bichlbaum, would have joined us, but is still in jail after being arrested yesterday) about their goals, their pranks and their agenda for the week. We also talk to Steven Heller, co-chair of MFA design at the School for Visual Arts, about whether such pranks change conversations in a positive way or just distract from important topics.

For more from the Yes Men, check out their movie, The Yes Men Fix the World, which opens nationally on October 23rd, or read their book The Yes Men: The True Story of the End of the World Trade Organization.

Lately the Yes Men have been touting the benefits of a new product, the Survivaball. Click through for more videos from the Yes Men:

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

China's Change on Climate

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Chinese president Hu Jintao told the U.N. that climate change "has a profound impact on the survival and development of mankind," but stopped short of offering specifics on his country's plans to address the problem. Still, Chinese policy expert Taiya Smith tells us the speech is a big deal because it shows the country is moving away from pursuing development at all costs. That's good news for Henrik Fleischer, the CEO of energy technology firm Sargas, who tells about the bright future he sees for his carbon capture technology in the Chinese market. 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

President Obama's UN Debut

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Yesterday President Obama took to the international stage as he made his United Nations debut. From yesterday’s climate change summit to tomorrow’s nuclear disarmament talk — and anticipated flourishes from Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Libya's Muammar Gaddafi along the way — we take a look at President Obama’s global positioning with worldly thinkers Richard Wolffe and Reihan Salam. Richard Wolffe is a journalist and author of the bestselling book "Renegade: The Making of a President." Reihan Salam is a fellow at the New America Foundation and editor of The American Scene.

Watch the president's address to the United Nations:

Comment

The Takeaway

US vs. China: A Climate Showdown

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Today, at a one-day U.N. summit, President Obama will talk face-to-face with Chinese President Hu Jintao. The two aim to get beyond roiling trade disputes to attempt an agreement on global warming legislation. What factors are separating these two at the table? Here to tell us is David Biello, energy and environmental editor at Scientific American.

Comment

The Takeaway

UN General Assembly Convenes This Week

Monday, September 21, 2009

As the U.N. General Assembly convenes, it brings together all of its 192 member countries; this year, the U.S. is playing a larger role than usual. President Obama will attend some of the proceedings this week, starting with a summit on climate change. Then the General Assembly debate takes place, where a speech by Obama is scheduled to follow a speech by Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi. We talk to BBC diplomatic correspondent Jonathan Marcus, who is in New York covering the events.

Comment

The Takeaway

Hotter Planet Allows Shortcut Through Arctic

Monday, September 21, 2009

For hundreds of years, mariners have dreamed of a shipping shortcut through the Arctic that would allow them to speed trade between Asia and the West. Two German ships became the first-ever Western commercial vessels to sail that route, thanks to the recent thawing and withdrawal of the Arctic sea ice due to global warming. BBC Moscow correspondent Richard Galpin tells us what he saw as one of the first journalists onboard this historic journey.

Comment

The Takeaway

Top Polluters Meet in Washington

Thursday, September 17, 2009

The Copenhagen Conference, planned for December this year, aims to create a "Copenhagen Protocol" to address worldwide climate change.  In preparation for this winter's conference, representatives of 17 countries are meeting in Washington today for a major forum on energy and climate. Included in the meeting are some of the world's biggest polluters, including China and the United States. David Biello, associate editor for Scientific American, joins us with a look at what's on (and what should be on) this group's agenda as they prepare for Copenhagen.

To see climate change in action, watch this video from Extreme Ice Survey, with 26 time lapse cameras in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, Canada, and Glacier National Park, the Extreme Ice Survey is creating the most comprehensive photographic survey of glacial change.

Comment

The Takeaway

The G-8: World Leaders Try to Clear the Air

Thursday, July 09, 2009

President Barack Obama and other G-8 leaders are meeting in Italy today. Top of their agenda is climate change. The leaders of the world's top industrialized nations are aiming at new targets to battle global warming, including a goal of keeping the world's average temperature from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius. But the wealthy nations were unable to persuade leaders of developing countries to commit to reductions of their own. Their cooperation is considered critical to avoiding the worst effects of climate change. Joining us from L'Aquila, Italy, is Peter Baker, New York Times correspondent, and Richard Gowan, associate director of New York University's Center on International Cooperation, a thinktank that works on the G-8, the U.N. and the World Bank.

"If you're the Indians or you're the French or you're the Americans, you're not going to show all your cards now. You're not going to do all the deal making now, because you've got another six months of negotiations ahead of you."
—Richard Gowan on negotiations at the G-8 summit

Comment

The Takeaway

Climate Tops the Agenda at G8 Summit

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

At this week's G-8 world summit, climate change is an unexpected guest at a meeting usually filled with talks of nuclear disarmament, the world's poor, and trade networks. The meeting takes place in L'Aquila, Italy, the site of the recent earthquake. With the start of the summit comes President Obama's debut into the world of climate negotiations. Can we expect any agreement to come out of this round of talks — all of which are setting the stage for a post-Kyoto climate treaty in Copenhagen in December? Here with his take is Jason Burnett, former energy and climate official with the EPA, now founder of Burnett EcoEnergy, a company that funds clean energy projects.

Comment

The Takeaway

Environment: Climate Bill Narrowly Passes in Congress

Monday, June 29, 2009

It was down to the wire on Friday night when the House passed a bill to curb global warming. It took eight Republicans to tip the balance in the Democrats’ favor. One report said Capitol phones were at capacity with so much last-minute jockeying between Congress members. Joining the show is The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich to explain details of the bill.

"[Liberals] don't want cap and trade. They want cap. Then if you're a polluter, you pay for the right to pollute. And that's not really what this bill does at first."
— Todd Zwillich on the new climate bill

Comment

The Takeaway

U.S. and China Heat Up the Global-Warming Debate

Friday, June 12, 2009

Top climate change officials from China and the U.S. met this week in Beijing to hash out a pre-Copenhagen plan for cutting greenhouse gas. The two countries are the world’s top two greenhouse gas emitters, according to the Brookings Institution. Together, they account for more than 40 percent of annual emissions. Any solution to the greenhouse gas problem may require both countries to transition to low-carbon economies.

Just back from a trip to China is Assistant Energy Secretary David Sandalow, who joins The Takeaway to discuss how talks are going. Click through for the full transcript of the interview.

Comments [1]