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Civil War

The Takeaway

Peacekeeper Calls Syria Conflict "Civil War"

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The conflict in Syria is escalating so rapidly and involving such sectarian violence that one U.N. peacekeeper has called it a "civil war." What does identifying the conflict as a "civil war" mean going forward?

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The Takeaway

The United Nations and the Threat of a Syrian Civil War

Friday, June 01, 2012

In the aftermath of last week’s Houla massacre, Syria appears on the brink. The threat of a full-scale, open civil war looms and fears are growing around the country’s violence spilling out across the Middle East. A first-time filmmaker whose debut documentary, “U.N. Me,” traces and critiques the history of the U.N., discusses how the organization should act in Syria.

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The Takeaway

Lawyer Fights for Syrians to Stay

Friday, June 01, 2012

On March 29, the Department of Homeland Security added Syria to the list of nations deemed so unstable that that temporary protected status is granted to the country’s nationals living in the U.S. Are conditions in Syria reaching a point where a rescue is in order?

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Talk to Me

A Reporter's Perspective on War at PEN World Voices

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

As part of the recent PEN World Voices Festival, Polish journalist and author Wojciech Jagielski was interviewed by Joel Whitney, a founding editor of Guernica: A Magazine of Art & Politics. Listen to the talk between Jagielski and Whitney.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War

Monday, December 26, 2011

Tony Horwitz talks about John Brown, the abolitionist whose raid on Harpers Ferry led to the Civil War. Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War tells the true story of the raid—plotted in secret, launched in the dark, it was a pivotal moment in U.S. history. Unlike most abolitionists, he was willing to take up arms, after Brown's capture, his defiant eloquence galvanized the North and appalled the South.

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The Takeaway

Ta-Nehisi Coates on 'Why So Few Blacks Study the Civil War'

Monday, December 12, 2011

The uneasy embrace of slavery in colonial America produced an economic boom, rendered the founder's debates over freedom from kings and despots questionable distortions of truth and logic, slavery enshrined rascism in the U.S. Constitution and made the Civil War inevitable. The War itself created an identity for the United States from which there was no escape, even though it seems from time to time that the Civil War blinks out in relevance. Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates says this narrative has to change. In a piece in this month's Atlantic, Coates says more black Americans need to study the war and their role in it in order to understand their place in history.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War

Monday, November 07, 2011

Tony Horwitz talks about John Brown, the abolitionist whose raid on Harpers Ferry led to the Civil War. Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War tells the true story of the raid—plotted in secret, launched in the dark, it was a pivotal moment in U.S. history. Unlike most abolitionists, he was willing to take up arms, after Brown's capture, his defiant eloquence galvanized the North and appalled the South.

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The Takeaway

John Brown: Civil Rights Legend or Homegrown Terrorist?

Thursday, October 27, 2011

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. The road to America’s bloodiest conflict was certainly a long one. But the spark that set the war in motion began on October 16th, 1859. That night, a fierce abolitionist named John Brown staged a bloody raid on the armory at Harper's Ferry. Historians have long cited John Brown's raid as the beginning of the end for slavery in the United States. But little has been known about the man himself, until now.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Ken Burns: From The Civil War to Civility

Monday, May 30, 2011

To commemorate the Civil War's 150th anniversary, PBS recently reaired Ken Burns' documentary "The Civil War." Burns, a documentary filmmaker for the past 30 years, talks about the continuing effects of the war and his new project, "Civility and Democracy."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America Aflame

Monday, May 16, 2011

University of North Carolina history professor David Goldfield, discusses the Civil War, the "fiery trial" that transformed the country. While others have viewed the war as a triumph of freedom, Goldfield sees it as America's greatest failure: the result of a breakdown caused by the infusion of evangelical religion into the public sphere. In America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation, he outlines the price of that failure and shows how the war accomplished what statesmen could not: It made the United States one nation and eliminated slavery as a divisive force in the Union.

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It's A Free Blog

Lincoln: The Greatest President of the Greatest Democracy

Friday, April 15, 2011

More than 14,000 books that have been written about his presidency and assassination. Why the fascination? Simply put, Lincoln was the greatest president of the world’s greatest democracy.

— Jami Floyd marking the 146th anniversary of President Lincoln's death.

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Features

Merchant's House to Display Photos of New York Civil War Regiment Soldiers

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

The American Civil War began 150 years ago. In honor of the soldiers who put their lives on the line, the Merchant's House in Manhattan is presenting a series of photographs of wounded Civil War soldiers who served in New York regiments.

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The Takeaway

Civil War Anniversary: Celebration of Confederacy or Segregation Reminder?

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. For whites in the south, the anniversary marks the start of a proud military engagement. For blacks in the south, the war led to the end of slavery and the start of the civil rights movement. And while celebrations for the event will be grand in scale and scope, this year's commemoration will not reverberate nationally as it did during the centennial. How do the two anniversaries compare? 

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WNYC News

For Civil War Reenactors, 150th Anniversary Is a Quiet Occasion

Monday, April 11, 2011

The sesquicentennial anniversary of the Civil War is on Tuesday. But for reenactors and others who bring the battle scenes to life on a regular basis, commemorating the 150 years since the first shot of the Civil War was fired in Fort Sumter the day will pass quietly.

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WNYC News

Remembering the Civil War in New York

Monday, April 11, 2011

WNYC

It turns out the ghosts of the city's Civil War past are in more places than one might think. Beyond obvious sites like Grant's Tomb (don't ask who's buried there), the city boasts several Civil War landmarks hiding in plain sight.

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Studio 360

More from Adam Goodheart

Friday, April 08, 2011

When the first shells exploded over Charleston’s Fort Sumter on the night of April 12, 1861, the news reached New York in a matter of hours. Journalist and historian Adam Goodheart describes the reaction of one New Yorker, a poet named Walt Whitman. Goodheart’s new book on the ...

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Studio 360

Weekend Warriors: Re-enacting the Civil War

Friday, April 08, 2011

The Siege at Bridgeport, a strategic site in Alabama, took place in 1862 — and again this year. Civil War re-enactors spend time and money reliving battles that were decided 150 years ago. They’ll tell you that if you just give it one weekend, you’ll be hooked, too. But one Confederate officer...

Slideshow: Siege at Bridgeport, 2011

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Studio 360

The Civil War: Then and Now

Friday, April 08, 2011

The Civil War began 150 years ago this week, when Confederate forces fired on Fort Sumter. The four years of bitter conflict that followed still echo in America today. “At every point in the history of this country, we feel like we're on the verge of Civil War,” historian Adam ...

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Studio 360

Visualizing the Civil War

Friday, April 08, 2011

Many of the images we know of the Civil War come from the photos of Mathew Brady. Brady and his assistants recorded the rigidly posed generals and the battlefields scattered with bodies. But very few people at the time actually saw Brady's pictures – and those who did were horrified. Illustrators like...

Slideshow: Mathew Brady and Winslow Homer

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Studio 360

Charleston Remembers the War

Friday, April 08, 2011

We know that the North and South remember the Civil War differently. But there aren't just two versions of the war: there’s practically a different version for every person doing the remembering. Studio 360’s Kerrie Hillman traveled to where the shooting started — Charleston, South Carolina — to see...

Slideshow: Charleston and the Civil War

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