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Anonymous 4 Bids Farewell With Songs From 1865

Thursday, April 16, 2015

In its last touring season, beloved a cappella ensemble performs selections from its latest album,1865: Songs of Hope and Home from the American Civil War in the studio.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Women Who Forever Changed Washington D.C. During the Civil War

Monday, April 13, 2015

Cokie Roberts introduces the resilient women who remained in America's capital after the declaration of secession, chronicling their momentous experiences.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Was Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, a Failed Leader or Misunderstood?

Friday, December 26, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian James McPherson argues that Davis's place in history deserves to be reconsidered.

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The Takeaway

150 Years Later, Atlanta Challenges Civil War 'Myth'

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Exactly 150 years after Civil War General William T. Sherman marched from Atlanta to Savannah with some 60,000 troops, some are arguing that history got it wrong. 

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Debunking a Civil War Myth, a Famous Literary Character, and Fighting Ebola With Celebrities & Christmas

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The Takeaway explores Gen. Sherman's historic march, novelist Richard Ford discusses his new book, and we look at the remake of a hit 1980s charity album.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Four Women Civil War Spies

Monday, November 10, 2014

Karen Abbott tells the true story of four women—a socialite, a farm girl, an abolitionist, and a widow—who risked their lives to become spies during the Civil War.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Was Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, a Failed Leader or Fundamentally Misunderstood?

Tuesday, October 07, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian James McPherson argues that Davis's place in history deserves to be reconsidered.

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The Takeaway

Lincoln's Gamble on The Battle to End Slavery

Friday, September 19, 2014

On July 12, 1862, Abraham Lincoln spoke for the first time about freeing the slaves. It would be six more turbulent months until the 16th president decided to take action.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Meddling Ex-Presidents during the Civil War

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Five former presidents were still alive when Abraham Lincoln took office. Chris DeRose tells how this ex-Presidents’ Club maneuvered, plotted, advised, and aided during the Civil War.

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The Takeaway

ISIS: From Militia to State

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The conflict in Syria is producing some gruesome images and harrowing statistics. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights is reporting that 1,600 people had been killed in just 10 days this month.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Music from Both Sides of the Civil War

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Randall Poster, music supervisor for Wes Anderson's films and for the HBO show Boardwalk Empire, discusses putting together a new album called Divided & United: The Songs of the Civil War. It features recordings by Loretta Lynn, Ricky Skaggs, Steve Earle, Karen Ellson, and Dolly Parton, Chris Thile, among others.

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Studio 360

Why the Song Dixie Continues to Divide Americans

Friday, July 05, 2013

It’s been a century-and-a-half since a minstrel tune called “Dixie” debuted in New York. The song went viral, and soon North and South alike were whistling “Dixie.” With the outbreak of the Civil War, “Dixie” became an anthem of the antebellum way of life. And today ...

Bonus Track: Elvis Sings "Dixie"

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The Takeaway

The Battle of Gettysburg, 150 Years Later

Monday, July 01, 2013

When Union and Confederate soldiers clashed at the Battle of Gettysburg, 150 years ago today, The Saturday Evening Post sent reporters to cover the fighting. Today, the Post is one of the few remaining publications that covered the Civil War, as the magazine began printing in 1821. Jeff Nilsson, director of archives for The Saturday Evening Post, remembers the battle and its legacy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle of Gettysburg

Friday, June 14, 2013

Allen C. Guelzo discusses the three-day battle of Gettysburg (July 1–3, 1863), the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. Gettysberg: The Last Invasion focuses on the experiences of ordinary soldiers and depicts the combination of personalities and circumstances that culminated on the battlefield at Gettysburg.

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On The Media

A Journalistic Civil War Odyssey

Friday, May 17, 2013

In 1863, New York Tribune reporters Junius Browne and Albert Richardson were captured by the Confederate army in Vicksburg, Mississippi. What followed was an epic journey through an archipelago of Confederate prisons, a daring escape, and a perilous 300-mile trek to freedom. It's the subject of the book, Junius and Albert's Adventures in the Confederacy: a Civil War Odyssey, due out at the end of the month. Author Peter Carlson takes Bob through the highs and lows of the adventure.

 

Music: Jim Taylor - Bonaparte's Retreat / Bonaparte's Charge / Bonaparte's MarchEastman Wind Ensemble - Liverpool HornpipeCraig Duncan - DixieJudy Collins - Battle Hymn of the RepublicCraig Duncan - Shiloh's Hill


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The Takeaway

Syria Death Toll Climbs to At Least 60,000

Monday, January 07, 2013

According to the most recent report from U.N. data specialists, nearly 60,000 people have died in the fighting in Syria, and that number may be a gross undercount. Lara Setrakian is a journalist and the founder of Syria Deeply, a news website that covers the Syrian Civil War.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“Death and the Civil War”

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Ric Burns discusses his documentary “Death and the Civil War,” based on the book by Drew Faust, talks about how the nation was transformed by the death toll of the Civil War, an estimated 750,000 people were killed—nearly two and a half percent of the population—from 1861 to 1865. “Death and the Civil War,” will premiere on American Experience on Tuesday, September 18, at 8:00 pm on PBS, in conjunction with the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, which is to this day, the single bloodiest day in American history.

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WQXR Blog

Civil War Events Feature Minstrel Song Revival

Sunday, September 02, 2012

Visitors to some Civil War anniversary events are hearing another long-silenced sound amid the cannon fire.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Red Cross Declares: Syria Conflict is Civil War

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

David Scheffer, law professor and director of the Center for International Human Rights at Northwestern University School of Law and the author of All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals, discusses the Red Cross announcement and what it means with regard to the Geneva Conventions, as well as the 10th anniversary of the International Criminal Court. Scheffer was the first U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues.

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The Takeaway

Juneteenth: The Other Independence Day

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Ever since 1776, America has acknowledged July Fourth as our day of independence. But there’s another independence day — today, June 19 — that’s acknowledged by many others as our true day of freedom. Why? Because it was on this date in 1865 that slavery in the United States ended.

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