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Civil Rights Movement

WNYC News

Thousands Attend Brooklyn Funeral for 'Dean of American Preachers'

Monday, April 13, 2015

WNYC
The life of civil rights activist Rev. Dr. Gardner C. Taylor was celebrated at the Concord Baptist Church of Christ in Bedford Stuyvesant.

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Studio 360

Rediscovering the Hidden Music of the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, April 02, 2015

A huge cache of potent protest music from the Civil Rights Movement has been hiding for decades.

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The Takeaway

50 Years After Martin Luther King, Racial Tension Haunts Alabama Town

Monday, March 09, 2015

Retro Report explores the legacy of the voting rights movement in the small town of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, where a fight over a small ferry inflamed race relations for decades.  

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The Takeaway

Retracing The Path from Selma to Montgomery

Monday, March 09, 2015

BBC North America Correspondent Aleem Maqbool retraced the the steps of those activists 50 years ago by walking from from Selma to Montgomery alongside one of the original marchers.

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Specials

RE:Defining Black History

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

During a month selected to celebrate “history,” we hear a lot of the same civil rights stories. In this special, explore some alternative narratives surrounding Black History Month.

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The Takeaway

Voting Rights 50 Years After Mississippi's Freedom Summer

Thursday, June 05, 2014

Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton helped organize and lead the Mississippi Freedom Summer movement, which began 50 years ago this month. She reflects on the volunteer's accomplishments, the movement's confrontation with President Lyndon Johnson, and the state of voting rights today. 

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The Takeaway

Rosa Parks' Legacy is Trapped in a New York Warehouse

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Amid celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, Rosa Parks' belongings are trapped in a Harlem warehouse, and important pieces of her legacy have remained hidden from public view.

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On The Media

The Re-Birth of the First Amendment

Friday, March 14, 2014

Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court made a decision in the case New York Times v Sullivan that would forever alter the way journalists practiced journalism. Brooke speaks with Andrew Cohen, contributing editor at The Atlantic and fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice, about the decision's impact on the First Amendment.

Supreme Court audio courtesy of Oyez®, a multimedia judicial archive at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Stokely Carmichael's Life

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

Stokely Carmichael was a controversial figure in black rights, straddling both the non-violent and Black Panther movements. In his new biography, Stokely: A Life, Peniel Joseph, professor of history and founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University and contributing editor at theroot.com, traces Carmichael’s life and what it says about the struggles for black power.

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State of the Re:Union

RE:Defining Black History

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

During a month selected to celebrate “history,” we are treated to a lot of the same familiar civil rights stories. In this special, you can hear some alternate narratives, ones edited out of the mainstream imagining of Black History.

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Specials

WNYC Black History Month 2014

Saturday, February 08, 2014

WNYC celebrates Black History Month with special programming throughout February.  We will feature specials every night at 8PM on WNYC FM and AM during the week of February 10th with additional specials on the weekends. The complete list of specials and their air dates are listed below.

The New York Public Radio Archives has pulled together some of the department's leading preservation work concerning African-American history. Listen to previously unreleased interviews with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and a rare 1965 interview with Malcolm X, plus much more. Explore the Archives here.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Fifty years ago today, hundreds of thousands gathered on the Mall in Washington, DC to call for increased civil rights for African-Americans. Peniel Joseph, professor of history and founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University, and author of Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama, reflects upon the March on Washington and Dr Martin Luther King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

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The Takeaway

50 Years After the March on Washington, A Look At Dreams for the Next 50 Years

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

On this 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, we turn an eye toward the future of the civil rights movement and the dreams of this generation of activists. Rashad Robinson is the Executive Director of Color of Change, and Majora Carter is the founder of the non-profit Sustainable Bronx. They are just two examples of black Americans who are dedicating their lives to improving the lives of some of America's most marginalized communities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

On MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Martin Luther King, Jr.  was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama, on Good Friday, April 12, 1963, and while he was in jail, he saw in the newspaper a statement from eight "moderate" clergymen who branded the civil rights protests extremist and "untimely." King drafted a furious rebuttal that became known as the "Letter from Birmingham Jail"—a work that would become a masterpieces of American moral argument and would inspire not just the marchers of Birmingham and Selma, but peaceful insurgents from Tiananmen to Tahrir Squares. Jonathan Rieder discusses the Letter, looking at its timeless message and its crucial position in the history of civil rights. His book Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed a Nation gives us a new perspective on the Letter and the man who wrote it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Legacy of Civil Rights Leader Bayard Rustin

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Producer-director Bennett Singer discusses the film “Brother Outsider,” a documentary exploring the life and work of civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, who influenced Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and played a major role in organizing the 1963 March on Washington. Rustin’s role in the civil rights movement has been overlooked largely because he lived as an openly gay man. Walter Naegle, Rustin’s life partner from 1977 until Rustin's death in 1987, and who will be accepting the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Rustin's behalf, also joins the conversation. “Brother Outsider” airs on the World Channel on August 28, at 7 pm and midnight.

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The Takeaway

Remembering the March on Washington & Next Steps for Civil Rights

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Fifty years ago tomorrow, 250,000 protesters from across the country converged on the Washington Mall for the 1963 March on Washington. Dorothy Pitman Hughes is a civil rights activist who helped to organize the march. Though 50 years have gone by, she says the country and we all as Americans still have much work left to do.

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The Takeaway

Reflecting on the March on Washington

Monday, August 26, 2013

This week, The Takeaway remembers the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Joyce Ladner was a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee at the March on Washington. It was the violence of her childhood growing up in Mississippi amidst poverty and deeply rooted racism that inspired her activism.

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The Takeaway

Revisiting the Civil Rights Movement Ahead of the March on Washington's 50th Anniversary

Friday, August 23, 2013

On the morning of August 28th 1963 the idea of America was tested and in the sounds of feet stepping and buses parking, there was a sign early that day that something would happen. It would not be a normal day, in Washington, in America, in the world. The March on Washington D.C. was a grass roots event, a first of its kind national news event. Today The Takeaway takes a look back on the March on Washington.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

"I Have A Dream" 50 Years Later

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author of The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement (Simon & Schuster), joins us to look back on the 50 years of civil rights history since the March on Washington.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Reporting Civil Rights; Conserving Digital Art; Novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie; the Life and Times of Charles Manson

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

Bill Kovach and Clayborne Carson, editors of a new anthology of writing about the civil rights movement, tell how James Baldwin, Robert Penn Warren, Gordon Parks and many others captured the struggle for equality. We’ll find how curators and conservators are preserving digital art. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks about exploring race and identity in her latest novel, Americanah. Jeff Guin talks about interviewing Charles Manson’s sister and cousin to trace the roots of the infamous murderer’s criminal career.