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Civil Rights

NYPR Archives & Preservation

Listen to Rare, Beautiful Music from the Robeson Archives

Monday, April 28, 2014

WNYC
In 1976, Paul Robeson Jr. came to the WNYC studios to share rare recordings from his father's influential life and singing career.
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The Takeaway

Rosa Parks' Legacy is Trapped in a New York Warehouse

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Amid celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, Rosa Parks' belongings are trapped in a Harlem warehouse, and important pieces of her legacy have remained hidden from public view.

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The Takeaway

Should We Teach Kids Entrepreneurship? | From Wall Street to the Trailer Park | Rosa Parks' Legacy is Trapped in a New York Warehouse

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Lethal Clashes Mark Start of Ukraine Peace Talks | Hundreds Remain Lost After South Korea Ferry Crash | Deportations Dropped 43% in Last 5 Years | Rosa Parks' Legacy is Trapped in a New York Warehouse | From Wall Street to the Trailer Park | Should We Teach Children Entrepreneurship?

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle to Pass the Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 passage has often been credited to the political leadership of President Lyndon Johnson or to the moral force of Martin Luther King. Yet, in The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act, author and New York Times editor Clay Risen shows, the story is much bigger than those two men—and includes unceasing grassroots activism, ringing speeches, backroom deal-making, and hand-to-hand legislative combat.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Internet and Capitalism; Biking Alone Across the Country; Errol Morris on Donald Rumsfeld; Passing the Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Jeremy Rifkin explains how the Internet is helping to make some goods and services almost free, and how that may lead to the eclipse of capitalism. Bruce Weber of the New York Times talks about his solo bicycle ride from coast to coast. Documentary filmmaker Errol Morris discusses his new film about Donald Rumsfeld, “The Unknown Known.” Clay Risen tells the story of how grassroots activism, stirring speeches, and backroom deal-making all helped ensure the passage of the Civil Rights Act.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Journalist Todd Purdum, recounts the dramatic political battle to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964, in his new book An Idea Whose Time Has Come: Two Presidents, Two Parties, and the Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which details the legislative maneuvering and the larger-than-life characters who made The Civil Rights Act a reality.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Civil Rights Act; Sleight of Hand; Humor Around the World; Federal Debt

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Politico senior writer and Vanity Fair contributing editor Todd Purdum looks back at the dramatic behind-the-scenes battle to get the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress. Then, master of sleight-of-hand, Ricky Jay, talks about the many different sides of magic. Dr. Peter McGraw and journalist Joel Warner discuss their global quest to learn what makes people laugh. Former Houston mayor Bill White talks about the government and public debt.

Soundcheck

Nina Simone's Civil Rights Legacy

Friday, March 21, 2014

On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we take a closer look at Nina Simone -- an icon whose story is complex, and whose contributions to the struggle for civil rights are indisputable.

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WNYC News

What to See — or Skip — in Art 'Chaos' Weekend

Friday, March 07, 2014

With two art fairs, the Whitney Biennial and dozens of exhibits in New York this weekend, how's an art lover to choose? Start with the Brooklyn Museum show marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act.

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WNYC News

NY Property Taxes Violate Civil Rights Law, Says Lawsuit

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

WNYC

Do renters pay higher property tax than owners?

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American RadioWorks

Say It Plain

Sunday, February 23, 2014

For generations, African American orators have been demanding justice and equality, reminding America to make good on its founding principles of democracy. From Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey, to Fannie Lou Hamer and Malcolm X, to Shirley Chisholm and Julian Bond, hear the stirring words of African American figures as they call for action on civil rights and the unmet promise of democracy.

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Specials

Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Starting in the 1950s, Black radio stations around the country became the pulse of African-American communities, and served as their megaphone during the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. Going Black examines the legacy of Black radio, with a special focus on the legendary WDAS in Philadelphia. The story of Black radio in Philadelphia is actually the story of a musical era that would have gone undiscovered, of Civil Rights and progress in the African-American community, and of how the radio medium has changed in the last century. Hosted by legendary Sound of Philadelphia music producer and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Kenny Gamble. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Civil Rights and the March Against Fear

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Aram Goudsouzian tells the story of one of the central dramas of the civil rights era—the “March Against Fear” in Mississippi and the shooting of the leader of the march, James Meredith. Goudsouzian's book Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear reveals the legacy of an event that would both integrate African Americans into the political system and inspire bolder protests against them. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Corporations and Public Health; March Against Fear; B. J. Novak Talks Short Stories; Antitibiotics in Animal Feed

Thursday, February 06, 2014

On today’s show: Nicholas Freudenberg examines the ways corporate influence and weakened regulations have affected public health over the last century. Then, the story of one of the central dramas of the civil rights era—the “March Against Fear” in Mississippi and the shooting of its leader, James Meredith. B. J. Novak, the writer/actor best known for his work on "The Office," talks about his new collection of short stories, One More Thing. Time magazine’s Bryan Walsh looks into why it took the Food and Drug Administration so long to act to stop the use of antibiotics in animal feed.

 

The Leonard Lopate Show

Black Barbershops and the Civil Rights Movement

Friday, January 31, 2014

Historian Quincy T. Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barbershops as businesses and civic institutions. He talks about how barbers played a significant though complicated role in 20th-century racial politics. His book Cutting Along the Color Line: Barbershops is a sweeping history of an iconic cultural establishment that shows how black entrepreneurship was linked to the struggle for equality.

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The Takeaway

Looking Back at Motown's Civil Rights Recordings

Monday, January 20, 2014

Motown has become an American institution. But Motown also had a spoken-word label called Black Forum, which was set up in 1970. Two years after he was assassinated, the label released a speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Television and radio broadcaster, Alvin Hall recently completed a half hour story on the Black Forum label for the BBC. He shares what he learned and describes why Motown got involved in civil rights recordings.

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The Choral Mix with Kent Tritle

Sounds of Freedom

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Today, we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with choral music that celebrates struggle and liberation from oppression.

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The Takeaway

Have A Criminal Record & Want A Job? Look Elsewhere.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

While it is illegal for employers to reject applicants solely because they may have a criminal record, the practice is widespread. Kai Wright, editor of Colorlines.com, recently wrote an article for The Nation called "Boxed In: How a Criminal Record Keeps You Unemployed For Life." He joins The Takeaway to discuss why our society should be interested in the employment of people with a criminal history and the positive effects it could have.

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The Takeaway

1967: The Year that Changed College Football

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

In the world of civil rights, 1967 was a historic year. Though slightly more modest, the college football field also made civil rights history in 1967. Samuel Freedman is the author of the new book “Breaking the Line: The Season in Black College Football that Transformed the Sport and Changed the Course of Civil Rights."

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The Takeaway

The Dreams of the Undocumented Community

Friday, August 30, 2013

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and Founder of Define America. He says that while there are obvious differences between the civil rights struggles of African Americans 50 years ago and those of undocumented immigrants today, he draws inspiration from their struggles and sees points of commonality.

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