Streams

 

Civil Liberties

The Leonard Lopate Show

Torture, Drones, Surveillance... And Civil Liberties

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The Director of the ACLU's National Security Project looks at the new Senate Report on torture in interrogation, as well as President Obama’s war legacy.

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The Takeaway

America's Game of Risk

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

It's been 13 years since the September 11th attacks, but terrorism remains one of the foremost threats facing the United States. How should the U.S. balance privacy and civil liberties?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

#TBT Brian and Salman Rushdie, 2002

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Ten or fifteen years ago, Salman Rushdie made a prediction about the kinds of social debates we'd be having "ten or fifteen years from now." 
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WNYC News

Muslims Challenge Judge's Decision on NYPD Surveillance

Friday, March 21, 2014

The group filed an appeal Friday to a decision that condoned police monitoring mosques and other locations in New Jersey.

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WNYC News

Bill Bratton—the First Time He Was NYPD Commissioner

Friday, December 06, 2013

Bill Bratton was just appointed police commissioner of New York -- again. The last time around, the mayor was Rudy Giuliani and there were nearly 2,000 murders a year. Looking back on the first Bratton commissioner-ship and the city he helped tame.

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On The Media

Battling media narratives over Syria, a terrible anniversary, and more

Friday, September 13, 2013

A shift in the discussion about air strikes in Syria, a look at civil liberties 12 years after September 11, and why the Internet is obsessed with cats.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Stop-and-Frisk Decision

Monday, August 12, 2013

WNYC reporter Kathleen Horan discusses this morning's decision in the stop-and-frisk case. She is joined by Samuel Walker, emeritus professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and author of several works on civil liberties and police oversight, including Presidents and Civil Liberties From Wilson to Obama, who testified during the trial about possible remedies.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Does the NYPD Need an Inspector General?

Thursday, March 21, 2013

As the federal trial over NYPD's stop-and-frisk practices continues, the City Council has agreed to establish an inspector general to monitor the NYPD. New York City Councilmembers Jumaane Williams (D-45, Flatbush, East Flatbush, Flatlands, and Canarsie) and Brad Lander (D-39, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, Gowanus, Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Borough Park and Kensington) co-sponsors of the Community Safety Act, talk about the plan.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Stop-and-Frisk Federal Trial Begins

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Ian Weinstein, professor of law and associate dean for clinical and experiential programs at Fordham University, talks about the details of the Stop and Frisk case, what's at stake, and what we can expect to hear over the coming month during the trial.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Forget the Constitution

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

The argument over the Constitution is typically between the "strict constructionists" and the "living Constitution" school of thought. Louis Michael Seidman, professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown University Law Center and the author of On Constitutional Disobedience (Oxford University Press, 2013), offers the contrarian view that the Constitution is outdated and that instead of re-interpreting it to fit current issues, it should be ignored altogether.

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Schoolbook

To Help Close the Achievement Gap, Address Stop-and-Frisk

Thursday, July 26, 2012

In an opinion article, an official of the New York Civil Liberties Union writes: "Anyone interested in increasing student achievement, and particularly in closing the achievement gap, should pay close attention to the impact of stop-and-frisk practices on the lives of black and Latino students, including on their view of authority and ability to succeed academically."

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It's A Free Country ®

Opinion: Are All Civil Liberties Created Equal?

Monday, May 21, 2012

Many politicians, from Mayor Bloomberg to President Obama, want to have it both ways on civil liberties: Loosening restrictions on same-sex marriage, while pushing the limits of constitutionality on crime and terrorism.

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The Takeaway

The Secret History of FBI Counterintelligence

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Since its founding, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has grappled with how to balance personal liberty and national security. The bureau grew exponentially in the years following World War I, as the country became increasingly terrified by the communist threat. The fear of communism often served as a guide for J. Edgar Hoover, the man who built the FBI and ran the Bureau for more than 40 years.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Indefinite Detention

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Mark Danner, contributor to the New York Review of Books and the author of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics, Violence, War, discusses President Obama's shift in opinion about a bill that would allow indefinite detention. Linda Sarsour, director of the Arab American Association of New York, joins the conversation. 

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The Takeaway

Bloomberg Says Zuccotti Park to Remain Closed Over Court Order

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Hours after police in riot gear stormed Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan to evict Occupy Wall Street protesters, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg defended his decision to clear the encampment in a press conference. Taking credit for the decision, Bloomberg said the raid was necessary for public safety. A judge issued a restraining order against New York City in the early hours of Monday morning, saying the protesters could return to Zucotti with their belongings. After initially saying the park would reopen at 8:00 am on Monday morning, Bloomberg said the park will remain closed while the city clarified the restraining order.

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The Takeaway

Occupy Wall Street Moves to Foley Square

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Occupy Wall Street protesters have vowed to carry on after being evicted from Zuccotti Park overnight Tuesday. After being thrown out of the park after two months, protesters regrouped after dawn on Tuesday in nearby Foley Square and marched toward City Hall. Ben Brock Johnson, digital editor for The Takeaway, saw protesters being removed from Zuccotti Park early Tuesday and spoke with protesters in Foley Square.

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The Takeaway

Two Reactions to the OWS Evicition

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

On Monday, The Takeaway spoke with New York University professor of international relations Alon Ben-Meir and National Review writer Charles C.W. Cooke to discuss reports of illness and lawlessness at Occupy Wall Street encampments around the country. Today, after Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered police to clear the protesters' camp at Zuccotti Park, Ben-Meir and Cooke rejoin the program to react to the day's events.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Civil Liberties After 9/11

Thursday, September 08, 2011

Nadine Strossen, former head of the ACLU, joins us to talk about how civil liberties have changed since 9/11, from domestic surveillance, body scanners, and indefinite detention to an expansive national security establishment that remains largely hidden from view.

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WNYC News

Report on NYPD-CIA Collaboration Sparks Calls of Oversight and an NYPD Denial

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

The NYPD is refuting a report that its counter-terrorism unit had an unprecedented collaboration with the Central Intelligence Agency and used spying as an intelligence-gathering tactic.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

New Police Technology Raises Privacy Concerns

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Starting this fall, law-enforcement agencies across the country will be outfitted with new devices that will make iPhones capable of scanning a person's face and matching it to a database of people with criminal records. The new facial-recognition technology, which is also able to collect fingerprints, has raised concerns with privacy advocates who say police who use the device may be conducting "searches" illegally without warrants. Julia Angwin wrote about the new devices in today's edition of The Wall Street Journal.

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