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Civil Rights

Fugitive Waves

18 – A Man Tapes his Town: The Unrelenting Oral Histories of Eddie McCoy

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

After a debilitating accident, Eddie McCoy took his passion for local history and a scavenged cassette recorder from a trash can and began taping his town, from the oldest citizen on down—hidden stories of slavery times, sharecropping,

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BackStory

The Supreme Court and Civil Rights

Friday, June 27, 2014

With the American History Guys

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Invalidates Arizona 'Proof of Citizenship' Policy for Voter Registration

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled against Arizona state's Proposition 200—a law that required would-be voters to indicate proof of citizenship before being eligible to vote. Arizona sate legislators and Attorney General Tom Horne defended such procedures as measures to counteract voter fraud. Kareem Crayton, University of North Carolina law professor, weighs in on what this ruling really means

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The Takeaway

54 Years Later: A High School Diploma

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

After more than 50 years, 71-year-old civil rights trailblazer, Olivia Ferguson McQueen, receives the long-overdue high school diploma she was once denied. 

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American RadioWorks

State Of Siege: Mississippi Whites and the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, February 24, 2013

No state in the South was more resistant to the struggle for black equality and none more violent than Mississippi. Drawing on newly discovered archival audio and groundbreaking research on the civil rights era, State of Siege brings to light the extraordinary tactics whites in Mississippi used to battle integration and the lasting impact of that battle in American politics today. Produced by American RadioWorks

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American RadioWorks

Say It Loud: Great Speeches on Civil Rights and African American Identity

Sunday, February 17, 2013

This American RadioWorks program traces the last half-century of black history through stirring, historically important speeches by African Americans from across the political spectrum and illuminates the ideas and debates pulsing through the black freedom struggle from the 1960s to the present.

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State of the Re:Union

State of the Re:Union- Who Is This Man?

Saturday, February 09, 2013

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I have a Dream” speech has become the shorthand of the Civil Rights Movement-- but we might never have heard it, if it were not for another man, who’s largely been forgotten by history: Bayard Rustin. In this program hour, we explore the life and legacy of Mr. Rustin, a black, gay, Quaker who brought Gandhian non-violent protest to the Civil Rights movement in America.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Whitney Young Provides Depth and Texture to Portrait of Racial Inequality

Friday, February 01, 2013

WNYC

Focused, uncompromising, and yet essentially pragmatic, Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League, answers questions at this 1966 meeting of the Overseas Press Club. 

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Community

WNYC's 7th Annual Martin Luther King Day Celebration: "Malcolm, Martin, and Medgar: A Reunion"

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Here's a glimpse of our 7th annual Martin Luther King Day celebration!

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Walter White of NAACP Asserts America's 'Race Problem' Undermines Overseas Efforts

Monday, January 21, 2013

WNYC

Walter White, head of the NAACP, ponders race and foreign relations at the Great Hall of Cooper Union, in New York City, in this 1949 recording.

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On The Media

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and The Public Imagination

Friday, January 18, 2013

On August 28, 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. did what he’d done countless times before: he began building a sermon. And in his sermons King relied on improvisation, drawing on sources and references that were limited only by his imagination and memory. It’s a gift — and a tradition — on full display in the "I Have A Dream" speech, but it’s also in conflict with the intellectual property laws that have been strenuously used by his estate since his death. In a segment originally aired in 2011, OTM producer Jamie York speaks with Drew HansenKeith MillerMichael Eric Dyson and Lewis Hyde about King, imagination and the consequences of limiting access to art and ideas.

Charles Mingus - Prayer for Passive Resistance (Live at Antibes)

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Foreign Correspondent David Halberstam Analyzes Conflict in Vietnam

Friday, October 12, 2012

WNYC

David Halberstam briefs this 1964 meeting of the Overseas Press Club on what he sees as a "sharp conflict" between America's official optimism and the reality experienced by reporters embedded in Vietnam.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James L. Farmer Jr. Advocates Revolutionary Freedoms for African-Americans

Friday, September 21, 2012

"America is being forced to face itself," James Farmer proclaims in this 1963 Overseas Press Club appearance, before discussing the upcoming march on Washington and the historical roots of the civil rights struggle.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Ralph Bunche Announces Landmark 1949 Arab-Israeli General Armistice Agreement

Friday, August 10, 2012

WNYC

In the early hours of February 24, 1949, on the Greek island of Rhodes, Dr. Ralph J. Bunche emerged from the Egyptian-Israeli talks to announce the signing of a General Armistice Agreement.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Abortion in 1966: Three Men Weigh in On Women's Rights

Thursday, July 12, 2012

WNYC

In this broadcast of Maincurrents, three panelists -- all men -- examine recent legislation to "liberalize" existing abortion restrictions, leading to a wide-ranging discussion of the practice, both in the United States and abroad, as well as the historical basis for restrictions.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

In MLK's Footsteps: Education as a Civil Right

Monday, January 16, 2012

Listen to excerpts from Sunday's event hosted by Brian Lehrer and Jami Floyd, managing editor of The Global Game, as they discuss Dr. King's battle for equal education for all.

Panelists included:

  • Cami Anderson, superintendent of the Newark public schools
  • Fredrick C. Harris, professor of political science and director of Columbia University's Center on African-American Politics and Society
  • Rachel Moran, dean of the UCLA School of Law
  • Harvard Sitkoff, professor of history at the University of New Hampshire
  • John A. Stokes, an original plaintiff in the Brown v. Board of Education case 
  • Touré, journalist and cultural critic
  • Villy Wang, founder, president and CEO of BAYCAT 
  • With live performances by:         

  • Toshi Reagon
  • Manhattan Country School      
  • Manhattan Theatre Lab 
  • Comments [18]

    Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

    Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 1964

    Monday, January 16, 2012

    On December 17, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King was honored by the people of New York for his unparalleled contributions to the civil rights movement in a City Hall ceremony presentation of the Medallion of Honor.

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    The Takeaway

    The Civil War: Celeste Headlee's Story

    Monday, January 02, 2012

    It's the 150th anniversary of The Civil War and the effects are still with us. Celeste Headlee reflects on her family's role in the Civil War; the branches of her family tree include both slaves and owners. The Civil War is over, but the fight continues; we still argue over whether to fly the Confederate flag and how to teach the history of the war.

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    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Plessy and Ferguson

    Tuesday, June 07, 2011

    Artist Keith Plessy, President of the Plessy & Ferguson Foundation, and Phoebe Ferguson, photographer, documentary filmmaker, and co-founder of the Foundation, discuss their friendship and the idea of "separate but equal" in today's society. Plessy is a descendant of Homer Plessy, and Ferguson is the great-granddaughter of Judge John Ferguson, author of the decision upholding segregation that was affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896 in Plessy v. Ferguson.

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    The Takeaway

    Civil War: Still a Difficult Race Issue

    Thursday, April 14, 2011

    It's the 150th anniversary of The Civil War and the effects are still with us. Celeste Headlee reflects on her family's role in the Civil War; the branches of her family tree include both slaves and owners. The Civil War is over, but the fight continues; we still argue over whether to fly the Confederate flag and how to teach the history of the war.

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