Streams

Cities

The Takeaway

What is the Most Perfectly Average City in America?

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Last week, while working on a story about your typical American community, New York Times writer Annie Lowrey asked via twitter, “What is the most perfectly average place in America?” Almost immediately, the internet lit up with nominations: Knoxville, Albany, and Jacksonville, to name just a few. But not everyone likes being average.

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The Takeaway

From the National to the Local: Federal Investment in Urban Policy

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

The Great Recession of 2007-2008 left many Americans unemployed and in debt, and yet, sociologist Patrick Sharkey notes, city crime rates have hardly changed since the 1970s. Sharkey argues that the the 2009 stimulus package allowed cities to escape many of the problems that plagued urban dwellers in the early 1980, but now that stimulus funding has ebbed, urban areas are in danger of decline. 

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Radiolab

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

Monday, April 08, 2013

What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet? We try a little experiment to find out.

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Radiolab

REBROADCAST: Emergence

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

This spring, parts of the East Coast will turn squishy and crunchy -- the return of the 17-year cicadas means surfaces in certain locations (in patches from VA to CT) will once again be coated in bugs buzzing at 7 kilohertz. In their honor, we're rebroadcasting one of our favorite episodes: Emergence.

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The Takeaway

What Makes Our Cities Unique: The Coral Castle

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

As part of our series on unique places around the country, today we visit the Coral Castle of Miami, Florida. Edward Leedskalnin, a Latvian immigrant, carved the series of structures single-handedly and without modern construction equipment.

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The Takeaway

The Desire to Be Hip Is Making All Our Cities the Same

Monday, March 04, 2013

Cities like New Orleans and Pittsburgh have benefited from major economic investments and new business models. But writer Chuck Thompson thinks this isn't always a good thing. He's the author of "Better Off Without 'Em." His latest article in The New Republic is called "Take this Microbrew and Shove It."

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The Takeaway

Lessons in Revitalizing Cities

Monday, March 04, 2013

With Detroit falling deeper into debt and the local government helpless to respond, governor Rick Snyder declared a financial emergency in the city on Friday. The next step is to appoint an emergency manager who will be tasked with turning Motown around.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaway | March 4, 2013

Monday, March 04, 2013

Lessons in Revitalizing Cities | The Desire to Be Hip Is Making All Our Cities the Same | What Makes a City Quirky? | GOP's New Priority: Spending over Defense | The Changing Face of the South

The Takeaway

What Makes Our Cities Unique: The Corn Palace

Monday, March 04, 2013

Whether you were born in a city or you relocate for personal reasons, it's often the norm that you find yourself identifying with the city and its traditions. Is your city more unique than the next or do you fall into the category of commonness?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Who Made Money Off Sandy?

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

A group of leading Senators have announced a deal on immigration reform. Chung-Wha Hong of the New York Immigration Coalition talks about the bipartisan proposal. Plus: Benjamin Barber on how cities are responding to global issues; WNYC’s Robert Lewis on the economics of the Sandy recovery, including lucrative contracts; Jad Abumrad and Sean Cole talk about a recent Radiolab piece about what doctors want for their own end of life care; Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY-18) talks about representing the Hudson Valley; and can we ever stop drivers from honking?

The Takeaway

Knoxville One of Three American Cities "Fully Recovered" from Great Recession

Monday, December 10, 2012

What do Pittsburgh, Dallas, and Knoxville have in common? Recent findings from the Brookings Institution show that these three cities are the only major metropolitan areas in the United States that are experiencing an economic recovery since the recession ended in 2009. Knoxville's Mayor Madeline Rogero tells us more about her city's recovery.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Detroit City Is the Place to Be

Monday, December 03, 2012

Detroit-area native Mark Binelli talks about Detroit—it’s long downward spiral and its new role as a laboratory for the future of cities. In Detroit City Is the Place to Be, he goes beyond the usual portrait of crime, poverty, and ruin to show how Detroit is being re-invented as a post-industrial city becoming smaller, less segregated, greener, economically diverse, and better functioning.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

The Decline of American Cities: Lewis Mumford's 'The City in History'

Friday, November 23, 2012

WNYC
Mumford de-emphasized technology as man's defining achievement, arguing that language and communication were the essential elements of civilization and that the city.
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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

A Conflicted Portrait of Robert Moses,'The Builder for Democracy'

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

WNYC
Moses laments the atmosphere of distrust that has arisen around government, the result of "altogether too many newspapers" conducting too many investigations.
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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Jane Jacobs Defends Urbanism in 1960s New York City Planning

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

WNYC
Jane Jacobs explains her role as a community leader in the fight against what she views as the excesses and excrescences of the arrogant Modernist redesign of city neighborhoods.
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The Takeaway

Detroit: The Next Design Mecca?

Friday, September 21, 2012

Reed Kroloff is no stranger to cities that are in need of a rebirth. As dean of architecture at Tulane University, he was responsible for bringing back 97 percent of the school's student body after Hurricane Katrina. This week, Kroloff is a part of the second annual Detroit Design Festival. He explains why he thinks that the Motor City could be the next design mecca.

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: Odd Things Happen When You Chop Up Cities And Stack Them Sideways

Thursday, September 13, 2012

NPR

Robert takes a look at a series of dissected cities, and finds himself falling for the charmingly crooked bits and pieces of one in particular.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jonathan Kozol on His Book Fire in the Ashes

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Jonathan Kozol discusses the inequalities inflicted upon poor children. Kozol has persistently crossed the lines of class and race, first as a teacher, then as an author of books about the children he has called “the outcasts of our nation’s ingenuity.” His new book, Fire in the Ashes: Twenty-five Years Among the Poorest Children in America, is about a group of inner-city children he has known for many years, young men and women who have come of age in one of the most destitute communities of the United States.

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The Takeaway

Evaluating the Tiny Life

Thursday, August 02, 2012

As cities like San Francisco, Boston, and the already crowded New York are considering lowering the minimum apartment size, we ask: How small is too small? And what are the challenges of tiny living?

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: A Literary Mix Tape

Sunday, May 13, 2012

Two tales of urgency and change, inspired by music.

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