Streams

 

 

Cities

The Leonard Lopate Show

Does City Living Make Us Happy?

Monday, November 04, 2013

Charles Montgomery explores the intersection between urban design and the science of happiness, and looks at some of the world’s most dynamic cities—from Bogotá to medieval Tuscan hill towns to modern-day New York City.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

GOP Struggles in Big City Politics

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Mayoral races are heating up across the country, but for the GOP in big cities, the future isn't as bright. On a list of the U.S.’s largest cities, you have to go down to number 13, Indianapolis, before you find the first Republican mayor. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the urban GOP mayoral void is Mayor Scott Smith, Republican mayor of Mesa, Arizona and President of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Sarah Burd- Sharps, codirector of Measure of America, weighs in on the shifting demographics of big cities nationwide.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Art and the Re-Making of Cities

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Artist Vito Acconci and chief curator at Creative Time Nato Thompson talk about this week's Creative Time Summit "Art, Place, and Dislocation in the 21st Century" and the role of art in place-making in our cities.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Smart Cities; Jesmyn Ward on Race, Poverty, Life and Death; David Bromberg Performs; Slavery and Universities

Monday, September 30, 2013

On today’s show: we’ll look into the forces that have shaped the planning and design of great industrial cities from the 19th century to the present. Jesmyn Ward talks about how the deaths of five young men who were close to her, prompted her to look at the role race and poverty played in cutting their lives short. Flat picking guitarist and vocalist David Bromberg performs live. And we’ll discuss the long, complex history that many of our oldest colleges and universities have had with slavery and emancipation.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Building Smart Cities

Monday, September 30, 2013

Urbanist and technology expert Anthony Townsend takes a broad historical look at the forces that have shaped the planning and design of cities from the 19th century to today. Today, cellular networks and cloud computing tie together tens of millions of people. In Smart Cities, Townsend examines how cities are using technology to improve urban life.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Taxi-Hailing Apps Thrive Across the U.S. & Meet Unique Need in NYC

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Most city dwellers are familiar with the vain attempts to flag down a cab when it’s raining or freezing or both. But new taxi-hailing smartphone apps are revolutionizing the relevancy of the outstretched arm and whistle. The apps are serving an alternate, and perhaps more important purpose in New York however. They are bringing cabs to underserved areas and underserved people. New Yorker Stacy-Marie Ishmael explains.

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Transportation Nation

Study: Cities Safer than Countryside -- Because Car Crashes Deadlier Than Guns

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

WNYC

Do big cities have an undeserved reputation for danger? A new study says when all types of fatal injuries are considered, you're 20 percent more likely to die from injury in most rural areas than in urban ones.

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Transportation Nation

In About Face on Parking Minimum Plan, DC Appeases Car Owner Concerns

Friday, July 12, 2013

WAMU

In D.C. a zoning proposal is a proxy debate for philosophies over what the city should be, and what roles cars should play in it. Today, on WAMU, a key planning official announces an about face on a contentious proposal to removing parking minimum requirements in some circumstances. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Remaking Detroit

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Detroit-area native Mark Binelli talks about Detroit—it’s long downward spiral and its new role as a laboratory for the future of cities. In Detroit City Is the Place to Be, he goes beyond the usual portrait of crime, poverty, and ruin to show how Detroit is being re-invented as a post-industrial city becoming smaller, less segregated, greener, economically diverse, and better functioning.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Power of Cities

Thursday, June 20, 2013

This interview originally aired live on June 20, 2013. An edited version was re-aired on August 9, 2013 as part of a special episode of The Brian Lehrer Show. 

Do we need to become a country of "trains, trees, and towers?" Vishaan Chakrabarti, director of Columbia University's Center for Urban Real Estate (CURE) and author of the new book A Country of Cities: A Manifest for an Urban America, discusses why he thinks "density is destiny", and how cities can solve the world's major problems. 

Comments [18]

The Brian Lehrer Show

NYC Leads the Way

Friday, June 14, 2013

With the federal government stymied by partisan gridlockBruce Katz, founder of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and co-author with Jennifer Bradley of The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy (Brookings Institution Press, 2013), talks about the way cities, and especially New York, are on the forefront of civic innovation.

Comments [13]

Radiolab

The Most Dangerous Traffic Circle In The World?

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Moving north: two vans. Moving east: three taxis, a peddle cab and one lady walking. Moving west: six motorcycles, another taxi, a truck and a van. Moving south: a bicyclist, two cabs and a truck. All of them meet and there are no rules. Who lives? Who dies?

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Comments [5]

The Takeaway

What is the Most Perfectly Average City in America?

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Last week, while working on a story about your typical American community, New York Times writer Annie Lowrey asked via twitter, “What is the most perfectly average place in America?” Almost immediately, the internet lit up with nominations: Knoxville, Albany, and Jacksonville, to name just a few. But not everyone likes being average.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

From the National to the Local: Federal Investment in Urban Policy

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

The Great Recession of 2007-2008 left many Americans unemployed and in debt, and yet, sociologist Patrick Sharkey notes, city crime rates have hardly changed since the 1970s. Sharkey argues that the the 2009 stimulus package allowed cities to escape many of the problems that plagued urban dwellers in the early 1980, but now that stimulus funding has ebbed, urban areas are in danger of decline. 

Comments [2]

Radiolab

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

Monday, April 08, 2013

What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet? We try a little experiment to find out.

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Radiolab

REBROADCAST: Emergence

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

This spring, parts of the East Coast will turn squishy and crunchy -- the return of the 17-year cicadas means surfaces in certain locations (in patches from VA to CT) will once again be coated in bugs buzzing at 7 kilohertz. In their honor, we're rebroadcasting one of our favorite episodes: Emergence.

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Comments [33]

The Takeaway

What Makes Our Cities Unique: The Coral Castle

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

As part of our series on unique places around the country, today we visit the Coral Castle of Miami, Florida. Edward Leedskalnin, a Latvian immigrant, carved the series of structures single-handedly and without modern construction equipment.

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The Takeaway

The Desire to Be Hip Is Making All Our Cities the Same

Monday, March 04, 2013

Cities like New Orleans and Pittsburgh have benefited from major economic investments and new business models. But writer Chuck Thompson thinks this isn't always a good thing. He's the author of "Better Off Without 'Em." His latest article in The New Republic is called "Take this Microbrew and Shove It."

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

Lessons in Revitalizing Cities

Monday, March 04, 2013

With Detroit falling deeper into debt and the local government helpless to respond, governor Rick Snyder declared a financial emergency in the city on Friday. The next step is to appoint an emergency manager who will be tasked with turning Motown around.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

What Makes Our Cities Unique: The Corn Palace

Monday, March 04, 2013

Whether you were born in a city or you relocate for personal reasons, it's often the norm that you find yourself identifying with the city and its traditions. Is your city more unique than the next or do you fall into the category of commonness?

Comments [2]