Streams

 

 

Cia

The Takeaway

CIA Drone Strikes Come Under Scrutiny

Friday, August 12, 2011

Speaking about the CIA's classified drone program, President Obama’s top counter-terrorism adviser John O. Brennan has said, “There hasn’t been a single collateral death because of the exceptional proficiency, precision of the capabilities we’ve been able to develop.” But a new report by British and Pakistani journalists claims otherwise.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole who Infiltrated the CIA

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter Joby Warrick, who covers intelligence for the Washington Post, gives an account of how a Jordanian double-agent penetrated both the inner circle of al-Qaeda and the highest reaches of the CIA, and then blew himself up, killing seven CIA agents, in Khost, Afghanistan. The Triple Agent: The al-Qaeda Mole who Infiltrated the CIA takes us inside the CIA’s secret war against al-Qaeda and tells who Humam Khalil al-Balawi was and how he managed to become a dangerous superspy.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Did CIA's Fake Vaccine Drive Undermine Global Health Efforts?

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Reports are emerging that the C.I.A. used a fake vaccination drive in Pakistan to gather intelligence on the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, prior to the May 1 raid where the Al Qaida leader was killed. The fake vaccine drive has received criticism from members of the public health community, who say this type of strategy could undermine future efforts to combat diseases across the globe.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Education of a CIA Interrogator

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

Former CIA interrogator Glenn Carle talks about his years working as a CIA agent. The Interrogator: An Education tells about his most serious assignment—interrogating a top level al-Qaeda operative captured after 9/11 and held at one of the CIA’s notorious black sites. Carle explains why he began to seriously doubt whether the CIA had captured the right man, describes the underworld of the Global War on Terror, and looks at the ways in which war alters our institutions and American society.

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

Former CIA Officer: I Was Asked to Spy on War Critic

Monday, June 20, 2011

Since the days of Watergate, when President Richard Nixon's White House collected information on political enemies, the Central Intelligence Agency has been prohibited from spying on American citizens inside the country. But in a recent article in The New York Times, Glenn Carle—a former senior CIA official—said there were at least two occasions when the George W. Bush White House asked intelligence officers to gather sensitive information on Juan Cole. Cole is a fierce critic of the Iraq War and professor at the University of Michigan. We talk with Carle, who was also a top counterterrorism official, about these alleged spying attempts by the Bush administration.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

CIA to Launch Drone Strikes in Yemen

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Yemen's President Ali Saleh is out of the country, but unrest continues in Yemen. As the country continues to experience a leadership vacuum and violent unrest, the United States will launch covert drone strikes in the country to target al-Qaida militants. Siobhan Gorman, Wall Street Journal intelligence correspondent reports that the Yemen program is modeled after the CIA's covert program in Pakistan, which was secretly approved by President Obama last year.

Comment

The Takeaway

Forensic Team Will Examine Bin Laden Compound

Friday, May 27, 2011

Pakistan has given the CIA permission to enter Osama bin Laden's compound in order to take forensic samples. Greg Miller, national security correspondent for The Washington Post. "The Pakistanis were not pleased with the raid, so it is a significant concession for them to let the team into the compound in Abbottabad," says Miller. While SEAL Team 6 gathered as much as they could, but with more time and tools, the CIA will be able to more thoroughly search the compound.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Geronimo(!)

Friday, May 06, 2011

Tonya Gonella Frichner, president and founder of the American Indian Law Alliance, recent North American Regional Representative to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and Ben Zimmer, executive producer of the Visual Thesaurus and Vocabulary.com, discuss the controversy over the use of an  American Indian hero, Geronimo, as the code-name for the Bin Laden operation. 

Comments [55]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The CIA After Bin Laden's Death

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Legacy of Ashes author Tim Weiner joins us to look at how the death of Osama Bin Laden changes the public profile of the CIA. We’ll also look at the agency’s long history of targeted killings.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Former Head of CIA's bin Laden Unit on the Al Qaeda Leader's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

Michael Scheuer, who led the CIA's Osama bin Laden Tracking Unit from 1996 to 1999 and was a counterterrorism analyst until 2004, discusses  bin Laden's death and what it means for al Qaeda and the continuing military operations in Afghanistan. His latest book is Osama bin Laden.

Comment

The Takeaway

National Security Team: Are the Lines Blurred Between Soldiers and Spies?

Friday, April 29, 2011

President Obama announced a reshuffling of his national security team yesterday, appointing CIA director Leon Panetta as Secretary of Defense, and General David Petraeus as head of the CIA. Are these appointments a sign that there is a blurred line between the country's soldiers and spies? Loch Johnson, regents professor of international affairs at the University of Georgia and 28-year-CIA veteran, speaks with us. 

Comment

It's A Free Country ®

National Security Switch

Friday, April 29, 2011

WNYC
Petraeus is not popular with the Pakistani Armed Forces and intelligence services, there’s been a lot of friction between them… My assumption is that President Obama decided that was a cost he was willing to bear.

Stephen Walt, professor of international affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Blurred Line: Military and Intelligence

Friday, April 29, 2011

What does it mean that Gen. David Petraeus is taking over at the CIA? Traditionally, there has been a line between military and civilian intelligence spheres, though personnel crossover is a trend. Is the line between the two areas blurring? We speak with Paul Pillar, 28-year CIA veteran and visiting Georgetown University professor, to understand the changing relationship between the CIA and the military. We also talk with Loch Johnson, professor of political science at University of Georgia, about some of the same issues. 

Comment

The Takeaway

Obama to Name CIA Director Panetta as Defense Secretary

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

The Associated Press reports this morning that President Obama will name current CIA director Leon Panetta as the replacement for Defense Secretary Robert Gates. He'd also make General David Patreaeus Panetta's replacement at the CIA. The changes are expected to take effect this summer, after a Senate confirmation. David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times speaks with us about this news.

Comment

On The Media

The CIA Declassifies Invisible Ink

Friday, April 22, 2011

On Tuesday, the CIA declassified the government's six oldest classified documents, dating from 1917 and 1918.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

Remembering US Foreign Policy and the Bay of Pigs

Friday, April 15, 2011

Fifty years ago this weekend, the Central Intelligence Agency launched a covert attack on Cuba in what became known as The Bay of Pigs. The three day assault, which was carried out under the auspices of a Cuban rebel group, was a fiasco. The rebels were captured and killed, along with a handful of CIA intelligence officers. It was just three months after John F. Kennedy took over the White House, and while the plan had been initiated under Dwight D. Eisenhower, it was Kennedy who signed off on the operation.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: The Acquittal of Luis Posada Carriles

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Eighty-three-year-old Luis Posada Carriles is a former CIA operative. He has been connected to the Bay of Pigs fiasco, the funneling of U.S. money to the Contras in Nicaragua in the 1980s, a series of attacks on Havana hotels in 1997, and the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner that killed 73 people. Posada was acquitted this month of charges that he lied to U.S. immigration officials when he entered the country in 2005. Jefferson Morley, a former editor at The Washington Post and the author of Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA, looks at Posada's background and his recent acquittal.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Pakistan to US Ops: Get Out

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

It's been several weeks since the CIA operative Raymond Davis was released from custody in Pakistan for reportedly killing two armed men in a traffic incident in Lahore, Pakistan. Since his release, relations between the US and Pakistan have been strained. The tensions have grown not only over the questions relating to the diplomatic immunity of Raymond Davis and his 47 days of detention, but also over a US drone attack that killed tribal leaders last month. Now Pakistan is demanding that the United States sharply reduce the number of CIA and Special Ops forces working in the country, and put drone strikes on hold.

Comment

The Takeaway

Julia Child and Paul Child: The Spy Years

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

Before Julia Child was a famous cookbook author, before she became television’s first iconic television chef, and long before she was played by Meryl Streep in the Nora Ephron film “Julie and Julia,” Julia Child worked for the Office of Strategic Services, or OSS. The OSS was a spy organization formed during World War II and was a predecessor to the CIA. Julia met Paul Child while they both served in the OSS in the 1940s.

 

Comment

The Takeaway

The CIA's Covert Operation in Libya

Thursday, March 31, 2011

When the United Nations voted to institute a no-fly zone over Libya, President Obama emphasized that the United States would not deploy ground troops in the conflict. But while there may not be American armed forces on the ground, The New York Times has learned that Central Intelligence Agency officials have been working in Libya for weeks, in an operation unknown to the American public — until now.

Comment