Streams

 

Cia

The Brian Lehrer Show

Seven (New) Things We Learned from Robert Gates

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Robert Gates, former CIA chief and Secretary of Defense under Bush and Obama, discusses his new book Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary At Work. Here: seven things we learned from Gates, from Hillary Clinton's "surprising" hawkishness to whether the Obama administration is being too aggressive in going after leakers.

Comments [34]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Andy Borowitz Guest Hosts; James Carville; Eleni Mandel; Writers and Drinkers; Inside the CIA

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate. On today’s show: Republican strategist Mary Matalin and Democratic strategist James Carville talk about their bipartisan marriage and why they’ve left Washington, DC. Eleni Mandell plays live from her latest album, “Let’s Fly a Kite.” We’ll look at the link between creativity and alcohol in the lives of six great writers. John Rizzo, who worked at the CIA for three decades describes the evolution of the agency’s enhanced interrogation program, its so-called “black sites,” and the interrogation of Al Qaeda suspect Abu Zubaydah.

The Leonard Lopate Show

John Rizzo on 30 Years of Controversy in the CIA

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

John Rizzo traces the CIA’s evolution from shadowy entity to an organization exposed to new laws, rules, and a seemingly never-ending string of public controversies. In Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA, he looks at the CIA in the years after the 9/11 attacks, when he served as the agency’s top lawyer, with oversight of actions that remain the subject of intense debate today. He’s the first CIA official to ever describe what “black sites” look like from the inside, to discusses the interrogation of Al Qaeda suspect Abu Zubaydah, and address the enhanced interrogation program.

Comments [11]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ryan Lizza on the NSA's "State of Deception"

Monday, December 16, 2013

New Yorker staff writer Ryan Lizza traces the history of the National Security Agency’s intelligence programs, from 9/11 to today. For his latest article, “State of Deception.” He speaks with key players in the intelligence community, including Senators Dianne Feinstein and Ron Wyden, and Matthew G. Olsen, the director of the National Counterterrorism Center. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat and a key member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, has for years been fighting to get the N.S.A. to be more forthcoming about domestic spy programs. Lizza looks at how the leaks from Edward Snowden may provide the momentum for changing the law.

Comments [11]

The Takeaway

Ex-FBI Agent That Disappeared in Iran Actually on Rogue CIA Mission

Friday, December 13, 2013

More than 6 years ago, Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent, disappeared in Iran. He has been presumed to be a hostage of some kind, a designation that the U.S. government has not taken issue with. But now it turns out that Levinson may actually be a casualty of a CIA operation gone wrong. Tim Weiner is a former reporter for our partner The New York Times and author of "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA" and "Enemies: The History of the FBI." He joins The Takeaway to discuss Levinson's case.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

C.I.A. Pays AT&T for Big Data

Friday, November 08, 2013

The New York Times has reported that AT&T is selling personal customer information to the C.I.A. for more than $10 million a year. There are no subpoenas or court orders involved. The reason? To assist with overseas counterterrorism investigations. Joining The Takeaway to weigh in is Susan Crawford, a professor at Cardozo Law School and the author of “Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age."

Comments [9]

The Takeaway

Valerie Plame on the CIA, Current Events, and Her New Crime Novel

Wednesday, October 02, 2013

Ten years ago, Valerie Plame’s career as a CIA operative came to an abrupt end when her identity was revealed by Washington Post journalist Robert Novak. She’s just completed her first crime novel, which centers on a female CIA agent. In her new book, Plame doesn't just borrow from her own life, she also draws inspiration from real world events. She joins The Takeaway to discuss her new work.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mark Mazzetti on the CIA's Shadow War

Friday, August 30, 2013

Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter Mark Mazzetti gives an account of the transformation of the CIA and America’s special operations forces into man-hunting and killing machines around the world. In The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth, Mazzetti tells the story of that shadow war, a campaign that has blurred the lines between soldiers and spies.

Comment

The Takeaway

New Snowden Leak Reveals Secret "Black Budget" for U.S. Intelligence

Friday, August 30, 2013

Edward Snowden's latest leak reveals the "black budget" for the U.S. National Intelligence Program in fiscal year 2013: $52.6 billion. Until now, the application of funds and the performance of spy agencies has never been made public. Lee Hamilton is the Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University, a member of the president’s Homeland Security Advisory Council and the C.I.A. External Advisory Board. He discusses the implications of Snowden's latest leak.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The CIA's Shadow War; Mary Williams; Philipp Meyer's The Son; Interviewing the Last WWI Veterans

Friday, August 30, 2013

We're replaying some favorite recent interviews. First, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Mark Mazzetti explains how the line between soldiers and spies has been blurred, and what that means for America’s national security. Mary Williams talks about growing up in the Black Panther movement and then being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Philipp Meyer describes his novel, The Son, set it Texas and spanning more than a century. And Richard Rubin discusses finding and interviewing find dozens of WWI veterans to capture their stories of the Great War before they died.

The Takeaway

C.I.A. Documents: U.S. Had Knowledge of 1980s Chemical Attacks in Iran

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

A new report from Foreign Policy says that the U.S. knew Saddam Hussein was planning to launch a chemical attack and still provided him with support. Rick Francona is retired Airforce Lt. Col. and a liaison officer in Baghdad during the 1980's. He joins The Takeaway to discuss his experience on the ground in Baghdad and why the U.S. would accept the use of chemical weapons.

Comment

The Takeaway

CIA Finally Confirms Role in 1953 Iranian Coup

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

It's long been known that U.S. and British operatives were behind the 1953 Iranian coup, which overthrew the nation's Prime Minister, but only yesterday did the CIA officially confirm it. Malcolm Byrne, the director of the National Security Archives, which made these documents public for the first time,  joins The Takeaway to discuss these revelations.

Comments [7]

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The NSA Has Your Selfies Edition

Saturday, June 15, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the oversight of the National Security Agency’s secret intelligence-gathering efforts. Plus, they talk about a New York Times photo tour of Beastie Boy Mike D’s new home in Brooklyn—a piece that incited a rousing email debate within the Slate office.

Comment

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Swab My Cheek Edition

Saturday, June 08, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the new revelations about the National Security Agency’s domestic spying program, and the Supreme Court’s ruling that upholds routine collection of DNA samples from criminal suspects.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

When the C.I.A. Gets Too Cozy with Hollywood

Friday, June 07, 2013

According to a report from the defense department that was made public on Wednesday, the C.I.A. disclosed the names of two special operations troops involved in the killing of Osama Bin Laden - specifically to “Zero Dark Thirty” screenwriter Mark Boal and director Kathryn Bigelow - and even arranged lunch with one of them.

Comment

The Takeaway

Boston Bombing: Was There an Intelligence System Failure?

Friday, April 26, 2013

Tim Weiner, author of "Enemies: A History of the FBI" and "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA" explains how terrorist threats are identified, and how information is, or is not shared across federal agencies.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Congress Questions Actions of FBI and CIA on Handling of Tsarnaev Case

Friday, April 26, 2013

Congress now wants to know why the FBI did not pursue further investigation of Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the Boston bombing suspect killed last week. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich walks us through how Congress is digesting the Boston attacks, and what that might mean for security policy.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jeremy Scahill on Dirty Wars

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Jeremy Scahill, National Security Correspondent for The Nation magazine, gives an inside view of America’s new covert wars. He looks at the CIA’s Special Activities Division and the Joint Special Operations Command, which conduct missions in denied areas, engage in targeted killings, and direct drone, AC-130, and cruise missile strikes. Scahill’s new book Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield follows the consequences of the declaration that “the world is a battlefield,” as Scahill uncovers the most important foreign policy story of our time.

There's also a film of "Dirty Wars," which opens June 7 at IFC Center and Lincoln Plaza.

Comments [13]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Wall Street Manipulation, Chuck Close, Jessica Soffer's Novel, Jeremy Scahill on Covert War

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi talks about whether bankers and brokers manipulated the market rates that affect global borrowing costs. Chuck Close describes the process of using large-scale Polaroid photographs to create his paintings. Jessica Soffer discusses her novel called Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots. The Nation’s Jeremy Scahill talks about America’s covert wars and the elite soldiers who operate in more than 100 countries around the world.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mark Mazzetti on the CIA's Secret Army and Shadow War

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter Mark Mazzetti gives an account of the transformation of the CIA and America’s special operations forces into man-hunting and killing machines around the world. In The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth, Mazzetti tells the story of that shadow war, a campaign that has blurred the lines between soldiers and spies.

Comments [5]