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Cia

The Takeaway

Torture Report: Past Mistakes & Future Prosecutions?

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The CIA went out of is way to lie to the White House and Congress about the intelligence derived from torture, and the level of violence inflicted on detainees, among other things.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Torture & The Law - Justifying the Unjustifiable

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The Takeaway explores the Senate's report on CIA torture.

The Takeaway

The CIA Torture Report: A 'Gut Check Moment' for U.S. Democracy

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

The report, which includes several disturbing findings, finds that "the interrogations of CIA detainees were brutal and far worse than the CIA represented to policymakers and others."

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The Takeaway

Valerie Plame on the New Age of National Security

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Valerie Plame and her husband were whistleblowers in the lead up to the Iraq War. She reflects on Iraq today, Edward Snowden's revelations, and her new novel.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The 'Spy' Who Scammed Us

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Jamie Smith claimed to be many things: ex-CIA, Harvard educated, a cofounder of Blackwater, and a hired gun. The only problem is that none of it is true.

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The Takeaway

Declassifying the Future

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Since he joined the CIA 25 years ago, Mathew Burrows has witnessed dramatic changes in world affairs. His new book predicts the trends over the next 25 years.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

From al Qaeda Insider to CIA Informant

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

A man who attended a militant madrasah in Yemen and spent a decade as a Jihadi not only repudiated extremism but became a double agent for the CIA and British and Danish intelligence. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Why the Spy Who Might Have Forged Peace in the Middle East was Assassinated

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Kai Bird talks about the life and death CIA operative Robert Ames, who was the most influential and effective intelligence officer in the Middle East.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Who Gets to See the CIA Torture Report

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The release of the Senate's massive assessment of the U.S. torture practices has once again been delayed amid argument about who gets to see it, who gets to redact it, and whether the public will ever get to know. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law University, discusses what comes next.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Entanglements in Iraq and Afghanistan

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

On today’s show: Sean Hemingway talks about his grandfather Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises for the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! CIA and National Security Council veteran Bruce Riedel tells the story of America's secret war in Afghanistan in the 1980s. Maggie Gyllenhaal tells us about her role in the new SundanceTV miniseries “The Honorable Woman,”  a drama about the volatile politics of the Middle East. Michael Kirk discusses his Frontline documentary, “Losing Iraq,” which traces the role the United States has played from the 2003 invasion to the current violence—exploring how and why Iraq is now coming undone.

The Leonard Lopate Show

America's Secret War Against the Soviets in Afghanistan

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The story of the defeat of the Soviet 40th Red Army in Afghanistan, which proved to be the final battle of the Cold War, and was aided by U.S. intelligence.

Comments [5]

On The Media

A FOIA Too Far

Friday, July 11, 2014

Jeff Scudder was working in the CIA's Historical Collections Division when he found a trove of documents that were declassified and ready for release to the public, but hadn't, due to bureaucratic strife. So he filed a FOIA request. Bob talks with Scudder about how this request ultimately resulted in his ousting from the agency.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Spy, the Supermench, and the Science of Sound

Friday, June 06, 2014

Jack Devine, the man who ran Charlie Wilson’s war in Afghanistan, talks about his long career at the CIA and of being in charge of the largest covert action of the Cold War. Shep Gordon is an institution in the entertainment industry, and he’s the subject of Mike Myer’s new documentary “Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon.” Michael Dobbs discusses House of Cards, his bestselling novel about the dark side of British politics that inspired the hit Netflix series. And this week’s Please Explain is all about the science of sound!

The Leonard Lopate Show

American Spymaster Jack Devine, the Man Behind Charlie Wilson's War

Friday, June 06, 2014

He recalls his more than 30 years in the agency, rising to become the acting deputy director of operations

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America’s Shadow Wars

Monday, May 05, 2014

Deniable covert operations are not new—they’ve been ordered by every president and every administration since the World War II. In many instances covert operations have relied on surrogates, with American personnel involved only at a distance, insulated by layers of deniability. Larry Hancock and Stuart Wexler trace the evolution of these covert operations from the Truman era through the Obama Administration. Their book Shadow Warfare: The History of America’s Undeclared Wars also explores relationship between the CIA and the military.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The CIA Torture Report You'll Finally (Maybe) Get to Read

Monday, April 07, 2014

The Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to release the massive report detailing Bush-era interrogation techniques. The White House still has to approve it, though - Karen Greenberg, head of Fordham's Center on National Security, discusses what we know and can expect.

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Gabfest Radio

Pulling Open The Veil On Bitcoin

Friday, March 14, 2014

The Gabfest panelists have much to talk about this week: Obama's new foray into comedy, Wes Anderson's directorial style, the reworking of Sagan's Cosmos, the confusion over virtual currency, and more.

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Radiolab

What Lies Beneath

Thursday, February 13, 2014

In “Neither Confirm Nor Deny,” we spend a fair amount of time on the remarkable cover story that disguised a CIA mission to lift the Soviet submarine K-129 from the bottom of the Pacific. That cover story puts the movie-cover-story of “Argo” to shame: from about 1970-74, the ...

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Radiolab

Neither Confirm Nor Deny

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

How a sunken nuclear submarine, a crazy billionaire, and a mechanical claw gave birth to a phrase that has hounded journalists and lawyers for 40 years and embodies the tension between the public’s desire for transparency and the government’s need to keep secrets.  


 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Brothers John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles Shaped the World

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

At the peak of the Cold War in the 1950s, two powerful brothers—Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and CIA director Allen Dulles —led the United States into a series of foreign conflicts whose effects are still felt around the world today. Historian Stephen Kinzer explains how they were both propelled by what he calls a quintessentially American set of fears and delusions. In  The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, Kinzer, looks at their campaigns that pushed countries from Guatemala to the Congo into long spirals of violence, led the United States into the Vietnam War, and laid the foundation for decades of hostility between the United States and other countries.

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