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China

Studio 360

In China, a Skyscraper-Sized Knock-Off

Friday, February 15, 2013

A huge office complex called Wangjing Soho is under construction in Beijing, consisting of three futuristic glass mountains designed by the superstar British architect Zaha Hadid. A thousand miles south, towers with an uncanny resemblance are rising in the city of Chongqing. Those ...

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

How dangerous is North Korea's nuclear test?

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

How dangerous is North Korea's nuclear test?

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The Takeaway

Chinese New Year Earns Stamp of Approval

Monday, February 11, 2013

For the Chinese, this Lunar New Year marks the Year of the Snake, a creature of the Chinese Zodiac that embodies gracefulness, materialism, and intelligence. Brooklyn-based illustrator Kam Mak's work can be seen in the Postal Service's commemorative stamp for this Chinese New Year.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

A post-Davos debrief on the state of the world economy

Thursday, January 31, 2013

A post-Davos debrief on the state of the world economy

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Foreign policy priorities for Obama's second term

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Foreign policy priorities for Obama's second term

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Chen Guangcheng and Jerome Cohen

Friday, January 18, 2013

Chinese civil rights activist Chen Guangcheng talks about his work on human rights in China, his new life in the United States, and his views on the Chinese government. Joining him is Chinese law expert Jerome Cohen, professor of law at New York University School of Law and a senior fellow for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ira Belkin, executive director of the U.S. Asia Law Institute at NYU School of Law, interprets Chen's remarks.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Citizen Journalists in China

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Steve Maing discusses his documentary about citizen reporters in China, “High Tech, Low Life.” It follows the journey of two of China’s first citizen reporters as they travel the country covering underreported news and social issue stories. Armed with laptops, cell phones and digital cameras, they become independent one-man news stations while learning to navigate China’s new social media landscape and censorship regulations. “High Tech, Low Life” is playing at the IFC Center through January 15.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bend, Not Break: From China to America

Monday, January 14, 2013

Ping Fu talks about growing up during China’s Cultural Revolution and how she made her way to the United States to become an entrepreneurial leader.

+ More Leaonard Lopate Show

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The Takeaway

U.S.-China Relations in Obama's Second Term

Monday, January 14, 2013

Over the next four years, President Obama will face a number of foreign policy issues, but our relationship with China is perhaps the most complex, and the most urgent. Donald Gross, author of "The China Fallacy: How the U.S. Can Benefit from China's Rise and Avoid Another Cold War," argues that the administration's pick of Senator John Kerry for secretary of state and Senator Chuck Hagel as secretary of defense represents a positive shift in U.S.-China relations.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaway | January 14, 2013

Monday, January 14, 2013

How Mass Shooters Get Their Guns | Kerry, Hagel Could Bring Vietnam Service to Obama's Cabinet | U.S.-China Relations in Obama's Second Term | What Should Boys Be Taught About Rape?

The Leonard Lopate Show

Risk and Reward

Monday, January 14, 2013

Ping Fu talks about her remarkable journey escaping the Chinese Cultural Revolution to becoming an entrepreneurial leader in the United States. National Book Award Winner Deidre Bair discusses her new biography of iconic New Yorker artist Saul Steinberg. We’ll get a preview of The Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival. Plus, Glenn Croston explains how we misinterpret risk.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Censorship Protests in China

Friday, January 11, 2013

Keith Richburg, Washington Post Beijing bureau chief, discusses the protests following government censorship of a newspaper in southern China and the relationship between the Propaganda Department and the Chinese media.

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On The Media

Mapping Gun Owners, International Journalists Fight Censorship, and More

Friday, January 11, 2013

The ATF's desire for a central database of gun transactions, journalists fight for the right to report on India's rape trial, an interview with 56 Up director Michael Apted, and Chinese journalists strike after the government censored an Op-Ed.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Tibet Today

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Joshua Eaton, a journalist who has been covering Tibet from the U.S., explains the reasons behind the recent uptick in self-immolation incidents there and the goals of these protests.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Demonstrations over censorship in China and Obama's pick for US defense secretary

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Demonstrations over censorship in China and Obama's pick for US defense secretary

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Transportation Nation

While Detroit Gains Ground, Japanese Automakers Stumble in China

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

A Toyota dealership in Qingdao was burned by protestors in a dispute over an island chain claimed by both China and Japan.

(Paul Eisenstein - The Detroit Bureau) General Motors and Ford Motor Co. have ended 2012 with all-time sales records in China — but the news is nowhere near as good for Japanese makers.

Stung by a dispute between China and Japan over a chain of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, Toyota, Nissan and Honda have all suffered a sharp decline in sales in what has become the world’s largest automotive market.

While General Motors has yet to release its final figures for 2012, the maker already passed its previous peak by the end of November, the 2.59 million vehicles it sold for all of 2011. GM has set a goal of boosting sales in China to 5 million by mid-decade.

[Related story: GM Sets Another New Sales Record in China – And it’s Not Alone.]

Ford, meanwhile, has confirmed its sales in China rose 21% last year, to 626,616, also an all-time high. The maker was a relative latecomer to the Chinese market but has been aggressively expanding both its product portfolio and production capacity over the last several years.

“Record 2012 sales highlight the positive response our customers have for our full portfolio of high-quality, safe, fuel-efficient and smart vehicles,” John Lawler, chairman and CEO of Ford Motor China, said in a statement. “Their enthusiasm for Ford cars validates our aggressive plan to introduce 15 new vehicles, double production capacity and double our China dealership network — all by 2015.”

Chrysler has also been pushing into record territory, though its volumes have been much smaller than its cross-town rivals. That’s ironic because Chrysler was the first Western maker to build vehicles in China, or more precisely through its Jeep subsidiary. But its original operation was assumed by former partner Mercedes-Benz following the break-up of the ill-fated DaimlerChrysler AG.

[Related story: Chinese Reportedly Eyeing Stake in Daimler AG]

Under new partner Fiat SpA, Chrysler is again making an aggressive push to expand in China.

Japanese makers were also slow to enter the Chinese market, in part to long-standing enmity between the two nations dating back to Japan’s brutal occupation of its neighbor during World War II. That simmering disdain came back to a boil when the Japanese government decided to buy what it calls the Senkoku Island chain last September.

That set off rioting in China, the bigger nation also laying claim to what it calls the Daioyu Islands. A number of Japanese-owned vehicles were destroyed and a Toyota dealership was even torched in what many observers believe were government-tolerated, if not sanctioned, riots.

Japanese industry executives had previously telegraphed the likelihood of declining sales in China which, they also cautioned, would hurt their earnings for the rest of the 2012 fiscal year – which closes on March 31, 2013.

Nissan took the biggest hit, sales declining 5.3% for calendar-year 2012, to 1.2 million vehicles. Nissan has been the most aggressive of the Japanese makers operating in China, among other things setting up the new Venucia brand with its partner there, Donfeng Motors.

Toyota suffered a 4.9% drop in volume last year, to 840,000. Honda’s China sales slipped 3.1%, to 599,000. Prior to the dispute over the Senkoku/Daioyu Islands, Toyota had expected to see a 10% jump in sales in China, reaching 1 million for the first time.

The market for Japanese products has begun to improve, Toyota China spokesman Niu Yu telling the Wall Street Journal, “Sales are getting better day by day, but it’s still hard to say when we can get back to the pre-protest level,” said.

But it’s unclear how quickly there will be a full recovery. Nissan, for example, suffered a 41% drop in demand in October, shortly after the dispute began, but sales were still off 24%, year-over-year, in December.

Follow The Detroit Bureau on Twitter.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

James Fallows on China's Business Environment

Monday, December 31, 2012

James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, and author of China Airborne, talks about the idea that some Chinese business people and intellectuals, including some with strong U.S. ties, support the authoritarian state.

    Comments [2]

    The Brian Lehrer Show

    China and US: Angie Tang on China's Development

    Friday, December 14, 2012

    Brian recently visited China on a trip for journalists sponsored by the Committee Of 100. He and his fellow travelers will be posting reflections on the blog over the next week. Here Angie Tang, executive director of the C-100, former director of the New York City Office of Immigrant Affairs, and former U.S. Labor Department Representative for the Northeast and Caribbean, responds to Brian's first post.

     

    Brian wrote: In this country, we often think of China first as an authoritarian state that engages in human rights violations. It was chilling to stand in Tiananmen Square as a tourist. But that said, I came away with the impression that China's leadership sees its form of government as less like, say, Kim Jong Un's and more like Michael Bloomberg's: a non-ideological technocracy. They've had all this economic and educational success, peacefully turned away from Mao's brutal revolution, gotten so many people out of poverty, conducted public opinion polls to determine people's needs, and imposed term limits on their top officials. And yet, the argument some people made that China is better off without political freedom still revolts me. I wonder how others among us are thinking about China's unique mix of repression, pragmatism and advancement.

    Angie Responds 

    Brian, your point about “China’s mix of repression, pragmatism and advancement” aptly captures the contradictory forces at play in shaping China’s economic development and in some ways, I would add national identity.

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    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Washington Update: Cliff, Rice, China

    Friday, December 14, 2012

    Clive Crook, a senior editor of The Atlantic and a columnist for Bloomberg View, and who was on Brian's recent trip to China, talks about the latest in the Washington DC budget negotiations, Susan Rice withdrawing her name from consideration for Secretary of State, and their reflections on China.

    Comments [19]

    The Brian Lehrer Show

    China and US: Clive Crook's First Response

    Thursday, December 13, 2012

    Brian recently visited China on a trip for journalists sponsored by the Committee Of 100. He and his fellow travelers will be posting reflections on the blog over the next week. Here Clive Crook of the Atlantic responds to Brian's first post.

    Thanks, Brian. You raise some very interesting questions.

    I think I see the basic duality you mention a bit differently. To me, it’s not about the advantages of technocratic-meritocratic leadership (which you can have with or without democracy). It’s about two kinds of freedom--political and economic.

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