Streams

 

China

The Leonard Lopate Show

Peter Hessler's Dispatches from East and West

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Peter Hessler, staff writer at The New Yorker and Beijing correspondent 2000-2007, and a contributing writer for National Geographic, discusses living in Asia and the United States, writing as both native and knowledgeable outsider in these two very different regions. His new collection of stories is called Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West, and includes his writing on his taste test between two rat restaurants in South China, and profiles of basketball star Yao Ming and an obsessive and passionate historian of the Great Wall, and other stories.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Cool War with China; Peter Hessler on Dispatches from China

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

On today’s show, New Yorker staff writer Peter Hessler talks about his time reporting in China and in the West. And Noah Feldman explains why he thinks the United States is entering a Cool War with China—a contest for alliances, resources, and economic dominance. 

The Brian Lehrer Show

Gatsby From Afar

Friday, May 17, 2013

Evan Osnos, China correspondent for The New Yorker, talks about what international readers and movie-goers learn about the U.S. from The Great Gatsby. LISTENERS: Did you read The Great Gatsby before moving here? Does what it says about American culture still hold true? Call 212-433-9692, or leave a comment here. 

Comments [2]

Money Talking

Weekend Coffee Table: Money Talking Weekend Reading

Friday, May 10, 2013

Money Talking host Charlie Herman and regular contributors Joe Nocera of the New York Times and Rana Foroohar with Time magazine tell us what they’re reading this weekend.

 

Comment

On The Media

Reporting Global Health Epidemics In A Wired World

Friday, April 12, 2013

In China, a new form of avian flu, called H7N9, has killed 10 people and infected an additional 28.  China’s gotten plaudits from the global health community for its transparency and responsiveness to this outbreak. But that's partly because many remember how China lied about SARS in 2002, a decision that killed hundreds. Public health reporter Maryn McKenna talks to Bob about what the standards are for reporting health epidemics in a wired world. 

 

Bonobo - Cirrus

Comment

America Abroad

America Abroad: Global Energy and Innovations

Friday, April 12, 2013

Broadcast Times: Friday, 11pm on AM 820, Saturday, 6am on 93.9FM, Saturday, 2pm on AM820 and Sunday, 8pm on AM820.

In "Global Energy and Innovations," we'll hear how the energy community has debated the need for a balance between oil, gas, and renewables here at home. We'll hear how India and China, with their own booming populations and increasing energy needs, are planning out their own energy needs. And we'll hear how energy technologies being developed at MIT are shaping future technologies, which are being exported to, of all places, the oil-rich Middle East.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

“The Revolutionary” - Sid Rittenberg in China

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Irv Drasnin, writer and producer of “The Revolutionary,” discusses the documentary, along with its subject, Sidney Rittenberg, a 91 year-old American expatriate who was the only American citizen to join the Chinese Communist party. He was dedicated to Mao’s revolution, reaching a position of influence unprecedented for a foreigner, and he was Mao’s acolyte through the upheavals which formed contemporary China. “The Revolutionary” opens April 12 at the Quad Cinema.

Comments [6]

WQXR Blog

Philadelphia Orchestra Announces China Tour

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Forty years after it became the first U.S. orchestra to visit China, the Philadelphia Orchestra is planning to go back with a new tour and new program.

Read More

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Carol Burnett, Mao's American Confidante, Hidden Cities, and Giant Crabs

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Carol Burnett talks about her relationship with her daughter Carrie, who recovered from drug addiction as a teenager and then died of cancer at the age of 38. Sidney Rittenberg, a confidante of Mao and the only American to join the Chinese Communist Party, joins the filmmaker of a new documentary about his life. Moses Gates introduces us to the hidden corners of New York, Paris, Cairo and Moscow. And we’ll find out how growing numbers of giant crabs are threatening the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay.

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Is war with North Korea imminent?

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Is war with North Korea imminent?

Comment

Soundcheck

Abigail Washburn Is A 'Post-American Girl'

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Since her 2005 debut, Abigail Washburn has paired the sounds of traditional American bluegrass and the folk music and arts of China. Nearly twenty years after her fascination with China began, the songwriter, and clawhammer banjo extraordinaire is dramatizing her own story in a new staged piece, Post-American Girl. Watch Washburn perform "Taiyang Chulai" in the Soundcheck studio.

    Comment

    Transportation Nation

    Switching Gears and Bringing Cycling Culture Back to China and Taiwan

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013

    Cyclists in Shanghai, China (Photo CC by Flickr user BadBrother)

    (Elise Zevitz -- The City Fix) China is experiencing the fastest growth in bike sharing in the world, with 39 bike share systems in place, counting the latest addition from last month in Aksu, near the the Kyrgyzstan border. At the head of the 39 cities sits Hangzhou, which currently runs the world’s largest bike sharing program with over 60,000 bikes in service. That’s 40,000 more than the Vélib program in Paris, France.

    Yet, at the same time, bikes have lost the wide appeal they once had in China. “In 1950, as a status symbol, every citizen had to have three things: a watch, a sewing machine, and a bicycle”, says professional fixed gear cyclist, Ines Brunn, who has lived in China since 2004. In the last decade, however, Brunn observes that the bike has become an image of the past and a mode of transport for those who cannot afford cars. However, local governments and their citizens in China and Taiwan are recognizing that more needs to be done to promote cycling as a commuter mode and a recreational activity, beyond implementing more bike-sharing programs.

    Read the full post at The City Fix.

    Read More

    Comment

    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Bo Xilai and Corruption in China, Bach 360, a Novel set in Vichy France, Animal Drones

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013

    We’ll look at the recent downfall of Bo Xilai and how it revealed a major power struggle within the Chinese Communist Party. Graham Parker and pianist Simone Dinnerstein talk about WQXR’s Bach 360 festival and about Dinnerstein’s performance of the Goldberg Variations. Nancy Kricorian talks about her novel, All the Light There Was, about an Armenian family’s struggle to survive in Vichy France. And we'll find about insects and animals engineered to be drones!

    The Leonard Lopate Show

    China's Bo Xilai Scandal

    Wednesday, March 27, 2013

    Wenguang Huang explores the scandalous story of the corruption of the Bo Xilai family—the murder of British businessman Neil Heywood; Bo’s secret lovers; the secret maneuverings of Bo’s supporters; the hasty trial and sentencing of Gu Kailai, Bo’s wife. In A Death in the Lucky Hotel Huang argues that it was just the first rumble of a seismic power struggle that continues to rock the foundation of China’s all-powerful Communist Party and has reached all the way to China’s new president Xi Jinping.

    Comments [2]

    World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

    What next for the Brics?

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013

    What next for the Brics?

    Comment

    On The Media

    Microsoft and the Global Network Initiative

    Friday, March 22, 2013

    China's surveillance of Skype is not particularly surprising. What is surprising is that Skype owner Microsoft is a founding member of the Global Network Initiative, an anti-internet censorship and pro-privacy organization. Bob speaks to Ethan Zuckerman, director of MIT's Center for Civic Media, about the Global Network Initiative and its apparent shortcomings.

     

    Four Tet - Pinnacles

    Comment

    On The Media

    Cracking Chinese Skype's Surveillance Code

    Friday, March 22, 2013

    We have known for years that certain words and phrases can get Chinese internet users flagged for surveillance by the Chinese government. Now a computer science graduate student at the University of New Mexico has compiled an extensive list of the sometimes surprising words and phrases that put Chinese internet censors on alert. Bob talks to Jeffrey Knockel about how he cracked the code of the Chinese version of Skype to compile the list.

    Comments [3]

    On The Media

    Rape coverage after Steubenville, the false promise of the personal finance industry and more.

    Friday, March 22, 2013

    How the media is covering yet another high school rape case after Steubenville, how personal finance luminaries lead the public astray, and an infamous hacker threatens to tarnish the public image of all hackers.

     

    The Takeaway

    Report: Chinese Hackers Linked to Government

    Tuesday, February 19, 2013

    Today an American computer security firm, Mandiant, released a detailed 60-page report linking members of one of China's most sophisticated cyber espionage units directly to the Chinese military. David E. Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times explains the implications of this report.

    Comment

    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Chinese Army Tied to Hacking Against U.S.

    Tuesday, February 19, 2013

    David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent at the New York Times and contributor to WNYC, discusses his reporting on a Chinese Army unit tied to hacking against the United States.

     

    Comments [13]