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China

The Takeaway

Tensions Rise Between South Korea, China & Japan

Monday, December 02, 2013

Last week, China flexed its muscles by unexpectedly declaring an air defense identification zone in the East China Sea, which touches South Korea and Japan. Now tensions are rising between the nations amid this territorial dispute. Joining us today to discuss what this dispute actually signifies is James Fallows, a national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine who has reported on China extensively.

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The Washington Report

Obamacare Website Improves & Syrian Chemical Weapons Cleanup Offshore

Monday, December 02, 2013

Eddie Robinson talks with New York Times Chief Washington correspondent David Sanger about the new challenges facing President Barack Obama's healthcare website, the long-running dispute between China and Japan, and how the U.S. plans to destroy Syria's chemical weapons at sea.

On The Media

Negotiating Access and Accuracy in China

Friday, November 22, 2013

Recent resignations at Bloomberg News and leaks about the company's reporting in China have raised questions about what concessions news organizations choose — or are forced to make — to sustain expensive foreign reporting. The New York Times Edward Wong talks to Bob about why financial reporting has become the biggest threat in the eyes of China's ruling party, and why Western media might have less reason to be worried than they think.

Bonobo - Sapphire

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The Takeaway

China Relaxes Decades-Long One-Child Policy

Friday, November 15, 2013

For decades, the family structure in China has been limited by the nation's one-child policy. But yesterday the Chinese news agency Xinhua announced yesterday that the nation will loosen its one-child policy, allowing couples to have two children if one of the two parents is an only child. Shirong Chen, Managing Editor at Foremost 4 Media Limited and former China Editor at BBC Global News, joins The Takeaway to explain the cultural and political significance of this shift in Chinese policy.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

China Aid to Philippines

Thursday, November 14, 2013

China has promised $1.6million in aid to the Philippines in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan (this after receiving criticism for their initial pledge of only $200,000). Jane Perlez, chief diplomatic correspondent in the Beijing bureau of The New York Times, discusses the effort on the part of China and what it means about their role in the region and as a global superpower.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

China’s third plenum could lead to far-reaching reforms

Monday, November 11, 2013

China’s third plenum could lead to far-reaching reforms

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Empress Dowager Cixi of China

Monday, November 11, 2013

Empress Dowager Cixi (1835–1908) is the most important woman in Chinese history. Jung Chang explains how she brought a medieval empire into the modern age. In her biography Empress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China, Chang looks at how Cixi achieved modern industries, railways, electricity, the telegraph and an army and navy with up-to-date weaponry. She also put an end to foot-binding and inaugurated women’s liberation.

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New Sounds

Reflections of China

Friday, November 08, 2013

For this New Sounds, listen to music inspired by the image of the plum blossom, China, or variations on the plum blossom. Hear a surprising acoustic piece by Greek composer Vangelis, also known for scoring "Chariots of Fire," from a 30 year old recording, "China." Also, Grammy Award winning composer, reed virtuoso and jazz master Yusef Lateef takes on the piece with Chinese globular flute.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Amy Tan's Novel The Valley of Amazement

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Amy Tan discusses her latest novel, The Valley of Amazement. It spans more than 40 years and two continents, and resurrects pivotal episodes in history: from the collapse of China’s last imperial dynasty to the rise of the Republic, the explosive growth of lucrative foreign trade and anti-foreign sentiment to the inner workings of courtesan houses and the lives of foreign  “Shanghailanders," both erased by World War II.

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New Sounds

Global Collaborations

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

This New Sounds program highlights some unexpected global collaborations- including but not limited to- Uzbeki bluegrass, musicians based in Italy who meld North African and Bollywood music, and Mardi Gras marching bands coupled with Argentinean tango flair. Listen to a Creole tango from the Boston-based Revolutionary Snake Ensemble, who regularly ride the party train down to Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

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On The Media

Apple Killed An App That Let Chinese People Circumvent the Great Firewall

Monday, October 07, 2013

OpenDoor is an app that lets you anonymously surf the internet on your iPhone or iPad. A third of OpenDoor's sales have historically come from China, where internet freedom's restricted and most people access the net on mobile. That is until this past summer, when Apple pulled Open Door from the app store after the Chinese government complained. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Five Star Billionaire, a Novel

Thursday, October 03, 2013

Tash Aw discusses his novel, Five Star Billionaire, which captures the vibrancy of China today and paints a portrait of the booming world of Shanghai, a city of grand ambitions and outsize dreams.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Iran and the U.S.; Elizabeth Gilbert's New Novel; Mao and the Chinese Transformation; the Life of Jane Franklin

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

On today’s show: former CIA analyst Kenneth Pollack talks about the significance of the more moderate rhetoric that we’ve been hearing from Iran’s president Hassan Rouhani—and whether the US can ever resolve the Iran nuclear question. Elizabeth Gilbert discusses The Signature of Things, her first novel in 13 years. We’ll look at the rise of Mao Zedong and the price that was paid in his attempts to transform the Chinese into “The New People” at whatever cost. Historian Jill Lepore introduces us to Benjamin Franklin’s sister Jane, who was a gifted writer and a shrewd political commentator.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Chinese Revolution 1945-1957

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Frank Dikötter chronicles Mao Zedong’s ascension and his campaign to transform the Chinese into what the party called New People. Due to the secrecy surrounding the country’s records, little has been known before now about the eight years preceding the massive famine and Great Leap Forward. In The Tragedy of Liberation: A History of the Chinese Revolution 1945-1957, Dikötter draws on hundreds of previously classified documents, secret police reports, unexpurgated versions of leadership speeches, eyewitness accounts of those who survived to reveal the horrific policies they implemented in the name of progress.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Threats to China’s Future

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Timothy Beardson discusses the challenges that stand in the way of China’s rise to global supremacy and the inadequate policy responses to those challenges. Stumbling Giant: The Threats to China’s Future focuses on China’s situation, including an aging labor force, extreme gender disparity, social instability, environmental devastation, the absence of an effective welfare safety net, and an inflexible governance structure.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

China's Challenges; David Plante on London; Tom Barbash on Short Stories; Mexico and the Drug Wars

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

We’ll take a look at the challenges that stand in China’s path to global supremacy, including extreme gender disparity and an aging labor force. Novelist David Plante talks about the first volume of his memoirs, Becoming a Londoner, about his first 20 years in that city. Tom Barbash discusses his new collection of short stories called Stay Up with Me. And find out how Mexico became home to Latin America’s biggest drug cartels and the violence and corruption that came along with them.

The Takeaway

Bo Xilai Sentenced to Life in Prison

Monday, September 23, 2013

Former Chinese Communist Party heavyweight Bo Xilai has been found guilty of corruption, embezzlement and bribery charges. A court in Jinan sentenced the former leader of Chongqing to life in prison with the right to appeal on Sunday. Adam Minter, Bloomberg's Shanghai correspondent, explains the significance of the verdict.

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On The Media

A Retweet Can Send You to Jail, A Like is Free Speech

Thursday, September 19, 2013

So here's two strange stories from opposite sides of the world.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The debt dragon: China's growing debt burden

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

The debt dragon: China's growing debt burden

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The Takeaway

Bo Xilai Trial Ends in China

Monday, August 26, 2013

One of China's most closest watched trials in decades came to a close today—that of the fallen communist party politician Bo Xilai. Jonathan Fenby is former editor of the South China Morning Post, and a former correspondent for The Economist. He's also author of the book: "Tiger Head, Snake Tails." He joins the program to provide an update on the trial and to discuss a possible verdict.

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