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China

The Takeaway

The Week Ahead with Marcus Mabry and Rob Watson

Monday, July 27, 2009

This week, The Takeaway talks to Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor for The New York Times, and Rob Watson of the BBC about how the China-U.S. talks in Washington will shape policy on the economy, the environment and foreign policy. Then we'll look at where Israel stands with Iran, and the timetable for voting on the new Supreme Court Justice.

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The Takeaway

A Conversation with Secretary of Energy Steven Chu

Friday, July 24, 2009

Steven Chu, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy, is reaching out to developing nations like China to negotiate on climate change. (He also reaches out to average Americans through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.) Steven Chu joins The Takeaway's guest host Katherine Lanpher to talk about the task of creating real progress in the fight against global warming.

You can connect with Secretary Chu through his Facebook page and see photos of what the Department of Energy is working on through the department's Flickr and Youtube pages.

"When I was in China, we signed an agreement that we were going to be cooperating on three areas in particular: Building efficiency, transportation — more efficient vehicles and electrification of vehicles — and finally, cooperating on how we can learn to use coal in a clean way, including the capture and storage of carbon dioxide."
—Secretary of Energy Steven Chu


Click through for a transcript of this interview.

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The Takeaway

Unrest in China Disrupts a Summit in Italy

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

As Han and Uighur Chinese battle each other in a flare up of ancient ethnic tensions, the flashpoint city of Urumqi in China's Xinjiang province has been filled with Chinese soldiers trying to quell the violence. The unrest, which may be the worst since the Cultural Revolution, prompted Chinese President Hu Jintao to leave the G8 meeting in Italy to attend to the situation. For the latest, The Takeaway is joined by Ted Plafker, a correspondent in the Beijing Bureau of The Economist who is in Urumqi, China, and Yuwen Wu, the editor of the BBC's Mandarin service.

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The Takeaway

Ethnic Tension in Northwest China Erupts into Riots

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

In the northwest corner of China, rival protesters took to the streets again on Tuesday, defying the Chinese government's efforts to lock down the province after clashes between Muslim Uighurs and Han Chinese left over 150 people dead and more than a 1,000 injured. The authorities imposed curfews, cut off cellphone and Internet services and sent armed police officers into neighborhoods in the Xinjiang province. For more we turn to Shirong Chen, China Editor for the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Following the Trail of E-Waste

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

What really happens to the mountains of computers at recycling centers throughout the U.S.? In the upcoming documentary “Digital Dumping Ground,” Frontline World Producer Peter Klein and a team of graduate journalism students from the University of British Columbia follow the trail of “e-waste” that leads to Ghana, China and India. Among the locals who act as e-waste guides in these countries is Jim Puckett, an environmentalist who discovered a startling center of e-waste —Guiyu, China, where the residents suffer some of the highest dioxin and lead poisoning in the world. And in Ghana, much of the e-waste is actually used by scam artists who take personal banking and credit card information off of the hard drives. Peter Klein joins The Takeaway to talk about his documentary.

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The Takeaway

In China, a Stimulus Plan that Works

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Today the World Bank is raising its forecast for China's economic growth this year. Strong government investment and increased domestic demand have helped supported the growth of China's economy. For more, we turn to the BBC's Michael Bristow in Beijing.

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The Takeaway

The Death of the Dollar

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Brazil, Russia, India and China sometimes referred to as the BRIC group, meet today to work out how to exert more control over the global financial system. On their agenda is how to create a new currency that could replace the U.S. dollar. Clifford Levy, New York Times Moscow Bureau Chief, joins the Takeaway to talk about this plan and what it will mean for the American economy.

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The Takeaway

U.S. and China Heat Up the Global-Warming Debate

Friday, June 12, 2009

Top climate change officials from China and the U.S. met this week in Beijing to hash out a pre-Copenhagen plan for cutting greenhouse gas. The two countries are the world’s top two greenhouse gas emitters, according to the Brookings Institution. Together, they account for more than 40 percent of annual emissions. Any solution to the greenhouse gas problem may require both countries to transition to low-carbon economies.

Just back from a trip to China is Assistant Energy Secretary David Sandalow, who joins The Takeaway to discuss how talks are going. Click through for the full transcript of the interview.

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The Takeaway

Uighur Detainees Put Palau on the Map

Wednesday, June 10, 2009


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The tiny South Pacific island state of Palau has agreed to temporarily resettle 17 Chinese Muslims being held in Guantanamo Bay prison. The men are ethnic Uighurs from China's north-western Xinjiang province; they were cleared for release four years ago by U.S. authorities but have had nowhere to go. They can't be returned to China for fear they'd be mistreated and their resettlement in the U.S. faced fierce political opposition. Palau's current President, Johnson Toribong, said his country was “honored and proud” to take the detainees. We speak to Palau’s former president Tommy Remengesau, who stepped down in January, about the island's decision.

(Click through for transcript)

"It’s the long-term ramifications. What is the view of the very people we’re trying to invite to Palau as tourists? What will they think of Palau if they know that we are hosting Guantanamo Bay detainees?"
— Former Palau president Tommy Remengesau on the hosting of Guantanamo Bay detainees

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The Takeaway

Remembering Tiananmen Square

Thursday, June 04, 2009

Twenty years ago today the Chinese army rolled their tanks into Tiananmen Square in Beijing and quashed the massive protests that were taking place there. Seven weeks of uprisings, demonstrations, and hunger strikes were wiped out under the treads of Chinese tanks. Casualties numbered in the hundreds or the thousands — there has never been an official accounting — but the toll on the democracy movement was near fatal. To help recreate the scene for us we are joined by the BBC's Kate Adie, who reported from the ground in Tiananmen Square. We are also joined by photographer Jeff Widener, who captured the quintessential image of the struggle — a lone man standing against a line of tanks.

See also the New York Times Photo Essay Behind the Scenes: Tank Man of Tiananmen.

Also: watch a BBC interview with Kate Adie about her experiences that day and her hopes for the future of democracy in China.

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The Takeaway

China: Pay No Attention to the Tiananmen Anniversary

Wednesday, June 03, 2009

This is the 20th anniversary of the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Tiananmen Square. But the date isn't being marked in China, where the Communist party has banned discussion of the events. Shirong Chen, the China Editor for BBC joins The Takeaway from London to talk about the ban.

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The Takeaway

Geithner's Message to Beijing: Your Money Is Safe

Monday, June 01, 2009

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner is in Beijing for a two-day visit to meet with top Chinese government officials including President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao. He is there to reassure his Chinese hosts they they need not worry about the $770 billion they've invested in U.S. treasuries. China being the biggest single purchaser of U.S. treasuries. The Takeaway is joined by BBC's Quentin Somerville who is in Beijing and following this closely.

For more on Geithner's visit to China, watch the video below.

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The Takeaway

The Agenda: What's In Store for the Week Ahead

Monday, June 01, 2009

The Takeaway talks to Marcus Mabry, International Business Editor for The New York Times, and BBC Arab Affairs Analyst Magdi Abdel Hadi about what's in the headlines for the week ahead. Topics include President Obama and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner hitting the road, GM contining the long, slow walk to bankruptcy, and predictions that unemployment numbers may hit nine percent for the first time in a quarter of a century.
"I expect both sides to really be diplomatic and conciliatory this week and to really talk a lot about being partners."
—New York Times international business editor Marcus Mabry on U.S. relations with China

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The Takeaway

China's Role in North Korea's High-Stakes Game

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

North Korea continues to raise the stakes in its game of nuclear poker, conducting a second nuclear test in as many days on Tuesday. Meanwhile, a South Korean newspaper has reported that U.S. spy satellites have detected signs that North Korea has started up its nuclear plant again. The international community has condemned Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions. But the only country with real clout over North Korea is China: the nation is North Korea’s neighbor and main trading partner. To find out China's take on the North Korea situation, The Takeaway talks to John Pomfret, author of Chinese Lessons: Five Classmates and the Story of the New China. He writes the blog Pomfret’s China on the Newsweek/Washington Post website.

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The Takeaway

Beyond Yao Ming: China and the NBA

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

In the middle of the Eastern Conference playoffs, the Cleveland Cavaliers are making news, and not just for their three-point shots and MVP LeBron James. Over the weekend, the Cavaliers agreed to sell a 15 percent stake in its franchise to a group of Chinese investors. This is the first major Chinese investment in an American sports team. For more we turn to The Takeaway's sports contributor, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin.

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The Takeaway

Join the Team! Obama Sends GOP Governor to China

Monday, May 18, 2009

President Obama has appointed Utah's Republican Governor Jon Huntsman as his Ambassador to China. Many say it’s a politically savvy move that will ensure the moderate Republican Huntsman,a Mormon who co-chaired John McCain's campaign, is out of the running as a candidate for the 2012 presidential election. The Takeaway talks to Alexander Burns, a reporter for Politico.

Here's the President announcing his choice of Jon Huntsman:

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WNYC News

Main Street NYC: Brooklyn Industries on Smith Street

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

The last time I reported on Smith Street, home to many boutiques and restaurants and squeezed between Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens, it was January. It was cold. And store managers complained that there was very little foot traffic. This time, I spent some time with one of ...

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The Takeaway

Round two on the Kyoto Protocol

Monday, April 27, 2009

The beleaguered Kyoto Protocol, enacted in 1992 to limit global greenhouse gas emissions, but was never ratified by the United States, is back up for negotiations this year. Will the U.S. be a real partner to the cap-and-trade agreement? In advance of the new Kyoto discussions, President Obama is meeting with the representatives of 17 governments at the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate in Washington D.C. The governments will be looking for indications of how others will navigate the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. For more The Takeaway turns to Andrew Revkin, New York Times environmental reporter.

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The Takeaway

China's economy hits a speed bump

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Today, China announced that it's GDP grew at a much slower rate in the first quarter of 2009, down almost 4% since this time last year and the weakest growth since quarterly records began in 1992. China says it's determined to achieve annual growth of 8 percent. So, what does this say about China's place in the shaky financial world? And what implications does China's growth have for the U.S.? To help answer those questions, The Takeaway is joined by John Pomfret. He is the author of Chinese Lessons: Five Classmates and the Story of the New China and writes the blog Pomfret's China on the Newsweek Washington Post website.
"They desperately want China to be a partner in the world's economic ship of state. As such, they are willing to sideline, soft-pedal, de-emphasize or basically ignore significant problems that exist in the U.S./China relationship."
—Author and blogger John Pomfret on the economic importance of China

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The Takeaway

Spies stake a claim in the U.S. electrical grid

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

An exclusive story from the Wall Street Journal says that cyberspies have penetrated the U.S. electrical grid and left behind software programs that could be used to disrupt the system. In eerie echoes of the Cold War, government officials are blaming China and Russia, but is nearly impossible to know whether or not this act is government-sponsored because of the difficulty in tracking true identities in cyberspace. The spooks were believed to be on a mission to navigate the U.S. electrical system and its controls. And while the intruders haven't damaged the power grid, officials warned they could. For more on this startling story, we turn to the Wall Street Journal's Intelligence Correspondent Siobhan Gorman.

Read Siobhan Gorman's article, Electricity Grid in U.S. Penetrated By Spies in today's Wall Street Journal.

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