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China

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Evan Osnos on the Dalai Lama

Monday, September 27, 2010

Evan Osnos on the Dalai Lama.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, September 27, 2010

David Sanger joins Kerry Nolan to discuss a mysterious computer worm attacking Iran's industrial plants, as well as the growing pressure President Obama is putting on China to revalue its currency.

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Peace Talks; Bishop Jones; China and Japan Relations Deteriorate

Monday, September 27, 2010

Israel's partial freeze on settlement buliding in the West Bank ended last night, and Marcus Mabry, associate national editor for The New York Times, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, discuss how this will affect peace talks between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.  They'll also take a look at what's ahead this week for Bishop Eddie Long, who has been accused of trying to sexually seduce four teenage boys; President Obama's continued conversations with middle-class Americans; how China and Japan's relationship is rapidly deteriorating, and more.

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The Takeaway

Japan Releases Chinese Fishing Boat Captain

Friday, September 24, 2010

One of the worst diplomatic disputes in years between the two most influential Asian nations is coming to an end. Japan is releasing the captain of a Chinese fishing boat captain who was detained after his ship collided with Japanese coastguards earlier this month. The Japanese said the collision was "deliberate, but not pre-meditated." Roland Burke, of our partner, the BBC, reports from Tokyo.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The far right in Sweden, arms in the Middle East and China's relationship with Japan

Thursday, September 23, 2010

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Uighur Update

Thursday, September 16, 2010

New York Times reporter Andrew Jacobs discusses the ongoing tensions between the Han Chinese and the Uighur population in Western China. He’ll recount the violence that erupted and killed nearly 200 people last July, and look at what’s happened since.

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The Takeaway

US Accuses China of Currency Manipulation

Thursday, September 16, 2010

The United States claims that China is deliberately keeping its currency between 25 and 40 percent undervalue, giving its manufactures an unfair advantage against imports and making Chinese exports even cheaper. As Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before Congress at hearings designed to force China to revalue its currency, the BBC's Mark Gregory gives us the latest from London.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Searching for a New Kidney

Monday, September 06, 2010

Daniel Asa Rose discusses the lengths he and his cousin Larry Feldman went to in order to get a kidney transplant. In Larry’s Kidney, Rose tells the story of helping his black-sheep cousin, who he hadn’t spoken to in 15 years, go to China and secure a kidney transplant, even though Chinese law forbids transplants to Westerners.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“Last Train Home”

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Director Lixin Fan talks about his film “Last Train Home:” a look at the journey of 130 million migrant workers to their home villages for the New Year’s holiday. This mass exodus is the world’s largest human migration, and it reveals a country caught inbetween its rural past and industrial future. “Last Train Home” opens September 3 at IFC Center.

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Transportation Nation

Life Inside China's 60-Mile, 11-Day Traffic Jam

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Traffic jam in Beijing (Flickr: johnmcga)

(The Takeaway)  For nearly two weeks, a stretch of highway outside Beijing saw monster gridlock, which stretched out over sixty miles and trapped drivers on China's National Highway 110 for days. It had been expected to last until mid-September, but last Thursday, after eleven days, the traffic jam suddenly broke.

Many people, of course, are wondering: Where did it go? How did it start? And could this kind of jam happen again?

The Takeaway spoke this morning with David Schrank, co-author of the Urban Mobility Report from the Texas Transportation Institute. He and his colleagues watched the Chinese traffic jam closely, and have been consulting traffic institutes in China on how to manage their road congestion in the future.

You'll also hear the voice of Zhang Lijia, a freelance journalist in Beijing who was trapped in the traffic jam for eleven hours.

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Transportation Nation

Moving Stories: Car sales up 60 percent in China; can Wall Street fund transportation? Oil trucks as Idaho's enemy

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Auto sales soar 60 percent in China this August, up across rest of Asia, too (Reuters)

Federal rulemaking to ban text messaging for commercial drivers clears another hurdle (Landline)

Can Wall Street fund a new transportation bill?  You bet, says Majority Whip Jim Clyburn.  Wants 0.25 tax on trades, which he says creates $500 billion for reauthorization. (Post and Courier)

Chevy unveils the Cruze, light on gas and aimed right at Ford Focus and Honda Civic (Detroit News)

New cars in South Africa now carry a tax on each extra gram of CO2 they create per km (News24)

Idaho Supreme Court will expedite hearing over large loads of refinery equipment, opposed across parts of the West (AP)

Madison, Wisc. unveils designs for four-story, $12M station that would be high-speed rail hub (State Journal)

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The Takeaway

Traffic Jams and China's 60-Mile, 11-Day Gridlock

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

For nearly two weeks, a stretch of highway outside Beijing saw monster gridlock, which stretched out over sixty miles and trapped drivers on China's National Highway 110 for days. It had been expected to last until mid-September, but last Thursday, after eleven days, the traffic jam suddenly broke.

Many people, of course, are wondering: Where did it go? How did it start? And could this kind of jam happen again?

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Transportation Nation

Moving Stories: 42 killed in Chinese plane crash; LA mayor: give bikes 3 feet; Twin Cities two-tier bus system

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Survivor of Chinese plane crash describes descent, malfunctioning exits on Embraer (LA Times)

Poor Visibility may have caused Alaska crash that killed former Sen. Stevens (WSJ)

China Railway in talks to build $30 Billion South African bullet-train (Bloomberg)

LA mayor backs law requiring motorists to give cyclists three feet on roads (Streets Blog)

Twin Cities asks: Are two tiers of bus service really fair?  (Star Tribune)

LA city officials debate parking regulations that will keep food trucks away from restaurants (KPCC)

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Features

China Plans to Make More Films, Build Theaters

Thursday, August 19, 2010

China said it will expand its movie industry by making more films and building more theaters to meet growing demand.

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The Takeaway

China Passes Japan as Second Largest Economy

Monday, August 16, 2010

China’s economy has been steadily growing over the past three decades, bypassing countries like Great Britian, Germany and France. And last night, the country took a major economic leap: China is now the world’s second largest economy, behind only the United States. The milestone was reached after Japan announced a slightly smaller second quarter value than China.

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WQXR News

Flooding, Landslides Wreak Havoc in Asia

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Bad weather continues to hamper relief efforts.

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The Takeaway

What This Summer's Natural Disasters Mean for Planet Earth

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

The number of people affected by the massive flooding in Pakistan over the past week is larger than the combined total of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Flash floods have hit neighboring Kashmir, killing at least 85 people, and China where more than 1,300 people are feared missing. In Europe, a heat wave has led to the deaths of 5,000 people, and in Russia drought and wildfires are ravaging the country.

Are all these simultaneous natural disasters this summer just a big coincidence, or is it a harbinger of something more serious for Planet Earth? Environmentalist Bill McKibben connects the dots and finds out how much it has to do with global warming.

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Transportation Nation

Breaking Ground on the Post-Interstate Interstate

Saturday, August 07, 2010

(Matt Dellinger, Transportation Nation) The highway megaproject, an animal still thriving in China and other developing countries, has become something of an endangered species here in America. This has a little bit to do with actual endangered species—and more specifically the environmental laws we put in place to protect them. It also has a lot to do with money, which is kinda tight these days: The Highway Trust Fund is famously broke, and the transportation reauthorization bill is stalled because there’s no consensus on how to make up for anemic gas tax revenues.

But despite all of this—and despite the fact that, technically, the interstate construction program ended in the mid-1990s—the biggest new interstate of the post-interstate era is still struggling its way into existence up and down the middle of the country.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Searching for a New Kidney

Monday, July 19, 2010

Daniel Asa Rose discusses the lengths he and his cousin Larry Feldman went to in order to get a kidney transplant. In Larry’s Kidney, Rose tells the story of helping his black-sheep cousin, who he hadn’t spoken to in 15 years, go to China and secure a kidney transplant, even though Chinese law forbids transplants to Westerners.

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The Takeaway

China Could Lose its Character(s)

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

One of the oldest written languages in the world is in danger of being forgotten. People in China send text messages more than any other population in the world, and many experts believe that this could lead to its people forgetting how to write Chinese characters. The phenomenon has been called, tibiwangzi: literally (take pen, forget character).

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