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China

The Takeaway

China Considers Requiring Families to Care for Elderly

Friday, January 07, 2011

Caring for the elderly has long played an important role in Chinese culture. But rapid economic growth has forced adult Chinese children to abandon their hometowns to find jobs in other parts of the country — often leaving their elderly parents on their own. This cultural shift has led Chinese officials to consider a law that would require adult children to care for their parents.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Evan Osnos on psychoanalysis in China

Monday, January 03, 2011

Evan Osnos on psychoanalysis in China.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

An American in China

Friday, December 31, 2010

Deborah Fallows, author of Dreaming in Chinese: Mandarin Lessons In Life, Love, And Language, writes about the cultural differences she encountered living in China.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Car Boom in China, Ohio DOT's Green Lantern, and Happy Fare Hike Day

Thursday, December 30, 2010

NYC MTA fare hikes take effect today. Click here for a primer.

The New York Daily News says that the MTA failed to follow its own emergency protocol before the blizzard that crippled large swaths of the subway system.

Car sales in China: how long will the government let the boom go on? (New York Times)

The paradox of the Dulles Toll Road: tolls are going up to help pay for the extension of the Metrorail out to the airport...but the increase likely means fewer people will take the road. (WAMU)

Ohio's DOT may turn to a green lantern to stem an increase in snowplow crashes. Officials are looking at changing a law to allow plows to have a green flashing light instead of a yellow one. (Dayton Daily News)

Toronto's Transit City: not dead yet! (Toronto Sun)

Redwood City will be one of the Bay Area cities involved in that area's regional bike share program. (Mercury News)

A consortium of Virginia businesses, transportation groups, and construction companies has endorsed Gov. Bob McDonnell's plan to spend $4 billion on roads over the next three years--with the caveat that the plan is merely a down payment on the crumbling transportation system's vast needs. (Washington Post)

Wired pulls together a list of ten transportation trends that is says rocked 2010. Meanwhile, the New York Times wants to know your worst travel experience of the year.

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The Takeaway

China Raises Interest Rate in Christmas Surprise

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

On Christmas Day, the Chinese central bank raised interest rates 0.25 percent, or 25 basis points, to 5.81 percent. It's the second such hike in just over two months, and comes in response to inflation and rising food prices in China. In response, the price of U.S. crude oil dropped slightly, amidst concerns the high Chinese demand for oil will slow; world markets dipped due to fears that increased interest rates could soften demand for other commodities. How should we understand the Chinese government’s decision? Was this a difficult move toward domestic fiscal responsibility, or a sneak attack on international markets?

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Build Your Own Bamboo Bike, and Combatting Beijing Traffic

Friday, December 24, 2010

Fast rail, slow build out: "Only 20 miles of track on the 284-mile Amtrak route between Chicago and St. Louis will be upgraded to handle 110-mph trains by 2012, state officials said Thursday." (Chicago Tribune)

Want to build your own bamboo bike?  You can, in Brooklyn. Video below! (via ABC News)

Turning solar energy into fuel: a new technique involves the element Cerium. (NPR)

An explosion of drivers in China has led to some hasty transportation planning in Beijing: The future will bring: "280,000 new parking spaces; 1,000 share-a-bike stations; 348 miles of new subway track; 125 miles of new downtown streets; 23 miles of tunnels; 9 new transportation hubs; 3 congestion zones; and 1 cure-all, “the use of modern technology.” (New York Times)

Toyota to launch family of Priuses. (Or is the plural Prii? Hmmm.) (AltTransport)

A new app helps you find on-street parking, of which Wired says: "Having access to real-time parking information could be the difference between finding a space and circling the wrong block endlessly, or seeing that parking is at a premium and deciding to leave the car at home."

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The Takeaway

Amid Tensions in North Korea, A Diplomatic Mission for Nuclear Transparency

Monday, December 20, 2010

As South Korea staged live artillery drills on an island near its disputed boarder with the North, New Mexico's Governor Bill Richardson was pressing the reclusive neighboring country not to retaliate. Richardson was in the country on a diplomatic mission to convince North Korean officials to allow nuclear arms inspectors allowed back into the country. Richardson was scheduled to make a statement from China today, but bad weather has delayed his flight out of North Korea. Chris Hogg, reporting for our partners the BBC from China, joins us for more on the story. 

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The Takeaway

Japan's Military Priorities Now Focus on China

Friday, December 17, 2010

A national review of Japan's military forces has resulted in a change in their focus: potential threats to stability coming from China. Japanese leaders now see the military of their gargantuan neighbor as a threat to stability in the region, along with North Korea. China replied this morning to the review, condemning the move. Will the review and new focus on defense against China be a source of tension between the two countries? For more on the story we're joined by Roland Buerk, who is reporting for our partner the BBC in Tokyo. 

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Peter Hessler on a Peace Corps volunteer's experience in Washington

Monday, December 13, 2010

Peter Hessler on a Peace Corps volunteer's experience in Washington.

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The Takeaway

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Liu Xiaobo

Friday, December 10, 2010

Author and pro-democracy activist Liu Xiaobo will receive the Nobel Peace Prize in absentia, today, as Chinese officials continue to hold him in prison. In 1989, Liu was working at Columbia University in New York, when news of the protests in Tiananmen Square reached him: he decided to go home. His ongoing writing advocating the end of one-party rule in China earned him acclaim overseas and a prison sentence at home. Who is the man receiving the Nobel Peace Prize today?

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The Takeaway

China and Others Boycott Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony

Thursday, December 09, 2010

With the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony set for Friday, China is making clear its disapproval of the Nobel Committee's having given this year's award to political activist Liu Xiaobo. China is not only publicly boycotting the ceremony, but also encouraging other coutnries to follow their lead. 18 countries have followed China's lead in refusing to attend the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony; what are their motivations? And how is all of this going over with the Nobel Prize committee? 

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The Takeaway

Playlist for an (Absent) Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Thursday, December 09, 2010

American violinist Lynn Chang will play at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony on Friday. Chinese dissident Liu Xioabo won't be able to attend the ceremony; he's being held in a Chinese prison. Chang tells us why he's chosen the songs in his set-list and whether or not he views the concert as a political affair, a musical event — or both. 

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: China Protests Nobel Peace Prize, Morning Headlines

Thursday, December 09, 2010

China and a group of other countries are boycotting the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony over the award being given to Chinese Dissident Lee Shaou Bao. But one violinist scheduled for a performance might be making a political statement with his instrument. 

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

John Cassidy on how Chinese state capitalism takes after the U.S. and Europe

Monday, December 06, 2010

John Cassidy on how Chinese state capitalism takes after the U.S. and Europe.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, December 06, 2010

The NYT's David Sanger calls in from China to discuss the new era of tension between the U.S. and the rapidly developing country.

The Takeaway

China's Thoughts on North Korea, Via Diplomatic Cables

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

One of the eye-opening revelations coming out of the latest Wikileaks document release is what some countries think of one another. Do Chinese officials think of North Korea as a "spoiled child"? Well, that's the characterization in one of the leaked cables. What else does China think of it's neighbor? 

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The Takeaway

Examining China's Role on an Unstable Korean Peninsula

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

After the death of two South Korean marines in a North Korean artillery attack on Tuesday, the United States has called on countries in the region to join with the U.S. in a unified diplomatic front. Since that call, China has condemned the attack and Hong Lei, the spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry called for "peace and stability on the Korean peninsula."

China has long been a strategic ally for North Korea, providing much needed food and humanitarian resources, but even the Chinese were taken by surprise by the attacks this week. And they seemed to be in the dark just a few days earlier when reports surfaced about North Korea's new uranium enrichment plant.

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WNYC News

Coffee Prices Rise as Demand Grows

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Your morning cup of coffee could start costing a bit more as prices for green-coffee, or unroasted beans, are now more than 50 percent higher than they were a year ago. The increase has already led to price hikes for many coffee brands and even higher prices are expected in the months ahead.

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The Takeaway

Eighteen Minute Online Traffic Diversion Puzzles Security Experts

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Cyber security experts are at a loss to explain why, last April, 15 percent of all web traffic was diverted through servers in China for 18 minutes. As the number of private citizen and government records, as well as important commerce explodes online, the question of who is watching is one of great import. Was China conducting massive cyber espionage? And if so, what do we have to worry about? 

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: LA Looks At Congestion Pricing, a Streetcar Named Red Hook, and Is NY Closer to ARC $?

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Is New York "well-positioned" to snag some federal ARC funds? Senator Gillibrand spoke to Ray LaHood Monday -- and she thinks signs point to yes. (Wall Street Journal)

The Los Angeles MTA is considering bringing some form of congestion pricing to the city. (Los Angeles Times)

Ray LaHood predicts that Rahm Emanuel will win Chicago's mayoral race.  (Chicago Sun-Times)

China will soon have more miles of high speed rail tracks than the rest of the world put together. (NPR)

The "If You See Something, Say Something" campaign heads to the DC region. Just in time for the holidays! (Washington Post)

Some airline travelers are not so happy about new TSA screening requirements. Neither are pilots.  (NPR)

If a Republican House bans earmarks, one of those transportation projects in doubt could be the Minneapolis region's Central Corridor light rail. (Minnesota Public Radio)

New York's Department of Transportation will present its Brooklyn Streetcar Feasibility Study (read: trolley service in Red Hook) at a community board meeting tonight. (NYC DOT)

More on New York's taxi of the future finalists. (WNYC)

GM dealers say that Chevy Volt production has begun. (Detroit Free Press)

Is F train performance now better than...an F? New York City Transit says yes. (New York Times)

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