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China

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Elizabeth Kolbert and Evan Osnos on the tiger-mother furor

Monday, January 24, 2011

Elizabeth Kolbert and Evan Osnos on the tiger-mother furor.

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The Takeaway

Your Take: Chinese Competition

Friday, January 21, 2011

China's President Hu Jintao has been in Washington this week, and all week we have been looking at the China-U.S. relationship, the economy, and American misperceptions about China. One of the questions we asked was whether or not we should be wary of China's economy in relation to our own. Listener Charles George, who grew up in Washington state and has lived in China for ten years, wrote to us on our website. He says that fears of economic competition from China are overblown. Charles joins us from Yantai, in eastern China, to talk more about his experience and views living in that country.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Chinese Economy

Friday, January 21, 2011

William Reinsch, president of the National Foreign Trade Council, joins Sheryl WuDunn, investment advisor, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist formerly with the New York Times, and the co-author with husband Nicholas Kristof of Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, to discuss the Chinese economy in light of President Hu's state visit

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The Takeaway

China: Good for US Economy?

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Politicians often use "China" as a code word for job-stealing, economy-busting or general wrongdoing. But President Obama stressed the importance of a strong relationship between the two countries during Wednesday's joint press conference with China's President Hu Jintao. Obama described the U.S.'s economic relationship with China as "positive" and "constructive" while touting the $45 billion export deal he cemented during President Hu Jintao's visit. Today we look at how we have benefited from China’s growing economy.

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The Takeaway

China's Growing GDP

Thursday, January 20, 2011

More than half of the construction cranes in the world are in China. The country is experiencing a huge spike in growth, reporting a ten percent increase of it's GDP. Bill Adams, resident economist with the Conference Board China Centre in Beijing, explains why the country is seeing such growth and how it's affecting the labor force. 

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Park Slope Residents To Air Feelings About Bikes Tonight, and Tulsa Transit To Do a Fast Forward

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Support for making people register their bicycles hits Park Slope (Gothamist)--which is also where, tonight at 6:30 (Old Reformed Church - Carroll and 7th Avenue) the NYC DOT will present their preliminary Prospect Park West bike lane findings to Community Board 6. The Brooklyn Paper says that the bike lane is working, and "accidents have plummeted dramatically since the installation of the controversial Prospect Park West bike lane in the spring, new city data reveals."

The NYC MTA says Select Bus Service has sped up travel on Manhattan's East Side by up to 19% (NY1).

Gen Y housing preferences were the subject of at least two panels at the National Association of Home Builders convention. A key finding: They want to walk everywhere. (Yahoo Real Estate)

Tulsa unveiled Fast Forward, that city's new transit plan, which will include standard buses, express buses, streetcars, commuter rail and light rail transit.  (Tulsa World)

China is planning on installing 10 million electric vehicle charging stations by by 2020. (Autoblog Green)

Ray LaHood blogs appreciatively about PBS's recent episode of Need to Know, which tackles high-speed rail.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials kicked off a six-week social media campaign Wednesday to generate public response about the country's transportation needs. The group plans to present the videos and comments to federal officials in March. (Washington Post)

These are strange transit days in Toronto. One Globe and Mail columnist writes: "First, a new mayor refuses to go ahead with a light-rail network that has been planned, approved, announced and funded, with contracts signed and construction under way. Now, the regional transit agency, Metrolinx, recommends going ahead with a project – electrification of GO Transit lines – that would take two decades to plan, approve and build and that lacks any government funding whatsoever."

Brooklyn residents say MTA platform closures leave them stranded. (WNYC)

Chrysler is partnering with the EPA to develop a new minivan that doesn't use batteries or electric motors to drive it (CNN Money). Meanwhile, Toyota is developing a car battery that doesn't use rare earth metals (Gas 2.0).

Is Venice going on a "road diet?" Suck it in, cars! (LAist)

One KALW listener witnessed a bus rider roasting marshmallows with a Bic lighter on a MUNI bus.

Mayor Bloomberg tweet from yesterday's State of the City address: "If subway fares increased as fast as pensions, by next year it would cost $8.39 a ride!"

Top Transportation Nation stories that we’re following: Mayor Bloomberg talked about livery cabs and ferries in yesterday's State of the City address.  NYC's first rental of a Chevy Volt happened yesterday. And: What can the US learn from Europe's restrictive parking policies?

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The Takeaway

Can US and China Share Military Goals?

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

On the heels of Defense Secretary Robert Gates' visit to China last week, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao will discuss the evolving relationship between each country's military this weeek. Gates urged the need for both countries to strengthen their military ties and keep one another informed about all their military capabilities. However, historically, China's military has been reluctant to take part in meetings with their U.S. counterparts.

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WNYC News

While China's Hu Jintao is in D.C, Other Chinese Innovators Hit Times Sq.

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Chinese ad in Times Square featuring inventor of hybrid rice Yuan Longping on January 19, 2011 11:35 a.m. (Photo by Stephen Nessen)

China's soft power push or public diplomacy campaign has hit Times Square in the form of a 60 second video loop. The video ...

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The Takeaway

The Challenges of Doing Business in China

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

A recent report from the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai states that 63 percent of companies surveyed say that the regulatory environment in China is either "not changing" or "deteriorating." Can talks between the Chinese president and U.S. officials changeChina's strict rules for foreign businesses working in China?

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The Takeaway

Elephant in the Tea Room: China's Human Rights Record

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

China’s human rights record is on the agenda during Chinese President Hu Jintao’s visit to Washington this week. Meanwhile, political dissident and Chinese Nobel Peace Prize-winner Liu Xiaobo remains in prison and his wife, Liu Xia, is thought to be under house arrest. Chinese-American human rights activist and former political prisoner Dr. Sasha Gong was a political prisoner in the 1970s. She says she'd like to ask President Hu about human rights.

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The Takeaway

Can President Hu Jintao and President Obama Repair the US/China Relationship?

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

China's President Hu Jintao arrived at Andrews Air Force Base Tuesday, for the start of his three day visit to our nation's capital. He is set to meet with President Obama and other top officials, before a black tie dinner in the Chinese President's honor. The meeting comes at a time when the relationship between countries is strained and both presidents are suffering from a lack of faith in their leadership.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: ARC Repayment Deadline Absolutely, Positively Jan. 25th; NJ Gov. Christie to NY Sen. Schumer: Mind Your Manners

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

NJ Governor Chris Christie says when it comes to voicing opinions about the ARC tunnel, NY Senator Charles Schumer should "mind his manners on the other side of the Hudson River."

Meanwhile, New Jersey's third--and final--deadline to repay the federal government $271 in unused ARC tunnel money is January 25th. (NorthJersey.com)

Amtrak passenger rail service will be restored to downtown St. Paul when the $243 million renovation of the Union Depot is complete next year. (Minnesota Public Radio)

San Francisco Muni employees will lose their free parking perk--and agency officials have vowed to crack down on their staff who park illegally on the street and sidewalks around their job sites (San Francisco Chronicle). But exactly when this will happen is unclear.

In his State of the City speech today, Mayor Bloomberg will roll out a proposal to change taxi rules to make it possible to hail a new category of livery cab anywhere in the outer boroughs. (WNYC)

Mismanagement in the Washington State Department of Transportation caused a “gross waste of public funds,” costing the state $42.5 million in cost overruns. (The News Tribune)

The Federal Transit Administration on Tuesday cleared the way for Oahu to begin construction on a $5.5 elevated rail transit system. (KITV)

One side benefit of China's epic traffic jams: enterprising village residents sell food to stranded travelers at a markup. (New York Times)

Ray LaHood says that "the number of laser strikes on airplanes in 2010 nearly doubled from the previous year to more than 2,800. This is the highest number of incidents since we first began keeping track in 2005."

A new British study found public transit riders are six times more likely to suffer from acute respiratory infections, and occasional riders are most at risk.  (New York Daily News)

Which cars cost the most to insure? Rule of thumb: "Any vehicle that would cause a teenage boy to stop and gawk." (MSN Money)

Minneapolis' Caribou Coffee redesigned bus shelters to look like ovens as part of an ad campaign to promote their new breakfast sandwich. Yes, that heating element is real. (Adrants.com)

Why are thieves swiping catalytic converters from vehicles--which happened this week at an auto dealership in Wayne, New Jersey? 1) The pollution-reduction devices contain platinum and palladium, and 2) they're relatively easy to steal.  (The Star-Ledger, KRDO)

Top Transportation Nation stories that we’re following:  NY Senator Schumer and NJ Governor Christie are trading rhetorical blows over the ARC tunnel. Also: House Transportation Committee chair John Mica says the next transportation authorization bill needs "alternate means of financing," and Montana legislators continue to wrestle with that state's DUI problem.

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The Takeaway

Creativity, Culture, and Misconceptions in Modern China

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

We hear a lot of negative messages about culture and creativity in modern China. We hear about censorship and a lack of free speech, about internet restrictions (no Facebook) and too many bribes. But when it comes to music, TV, communication, and creativity in general – are our perceptions of China totally off base? And for that matter, what are modern Chinese people’s perceptions of America and our culture?

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It's A Free Country ®

Catching Up with China

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

With the arrival of Chinese President Hu Jintao in Washington this week, it's time to catch up with the world's most ascendant superpower. By "catch up," we don't mean economically—although that's a huge cause for concern in America. For now, we'd do well to refresh ourselves, looking at the reasons our relationship with China is tense, how the country has navigated the global economic crisis (and continued to grow), and what's at stake if the two biggest kids in the sandbox can't get along.

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The Takeaway

Questions for President Hu

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Chinese President Hu Jintao arrives in Washington Tuesday nigth for the start of a four-day visit. Hu will start formal meetings with President Obama on Wednesday and will take questions from American reporters — a rare event for a man used to scripted appearances.

According to the Associated Press, four questions will be allowed: Two from U.S.-based reporters and two from Chinese reporters. If you were there, what two questions would you ask?

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, January 17, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on China's President Hu's visit to Washington and the cyber-weapon, Stuxnet.

The Takeaway

The US and China: Neither Friends Nor Rivals

Monday, January 17, 2011

As Washington prepares for a visit from Chinese President Hu Jintao this week, we take a look at what lies ahead in the shifting relationship between superpowers. Should we fear the "waking dragon"? We're joined by Gideon Rachman, chief foreign-affairs commentator for the Financial Times and author of "Zero-Sum Future: American Power in an Age of Anxiety," and Simon Tay, was an Asia Society 2009 Bernard Schwartz Fellow and is Chairman of the Singapore Institute of International Affairs. He is also the author of "Asia Alone: The Dangerous Post-Crisis Divide from America."

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: China, Health Care, Economy

Monday, January 17, 2011

China's President Hu Jintao is heading to the United States this week and will meet with President Obama at the White House on Wednesday. Marcus Mabry, associate national editor for The New York Times, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, discuss what they expect to come out of this meeting between the leaders of two of the most powerful countries in the world.

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, January 10, 2011

NYT's David Sanger discusses the shootings in Arizona and a trip to China for Defense Secretary Gates.

The Takeaway

US, China Discuss Military Relations

Monday, January 10, 2011

Defence Secretary Robert Gates begins a three-day trip to China to meet with China's defence minister. On the agenda: negotiationing old conflicts over Taiwain, arms, stealth fighters and weapons programs. BBC correspondent Martin Patience explains whether these meetings will help to lift tensions between the two countries.

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