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China

The Takeaway

Estimating Chinese Holdings of US Debt

Friday, July 01, 2011

China celebrates its 90th year of Communist rule today; but in the background, the nation is playing deeply capitalist games with international debts. China owns a large portion of US debt, but a Reuters investigation shows that they may have more than the Treasury could previously report. By buying up US debt through internationally disparate financial intermediaries, Chinese entities hid exactly how much US debt they had acquired—estimates say it is above $1.13 trillion. 

 

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Transportation Nation

Role Reversal: Calif. High Speed Rail Plan May Use Chinese Tech and U.S. Labor

Friday, June 24, 2011

(Chinese Maglev High-Speed Rail Train, (cc) by Flickr User cramnic)

Nearly 150 years ago America built the first transcontinental railroad with  American technology and capital, but imported labor. Some 10,000 Chinese workers used pickaxes and dynamite to cut tunnels and lay rail-lines, sometimes below feet of snow where locals wouldn't work. Now, President Obama is promoting a new generation of rail and the Chinese are again involved. This time, though, they don't just want to swing an axe. They want to design and part-fund America's first generation of high-speed rail based on their own existing technology. Americans would provide the labor.

Alastair Leithead, a reporter with the BBC, has been looking at the story for their series "Power of Asia." Our partner The Takeaway excepts some of his reporting and talks with Brian Leung, the author of "Take Me Home" a book about Chinese Americans in the nineteenth century.

"I think if this project takes hold there are going to be lots of interesting discussions about what labor pool is going to be exploited in the building this time," Leung says.

Hear the full story of China's American rail ambitions, the labor/capital role reversal on rail, and the interview with Leung at The Takeaway.

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The Takeaway

150 Years on, China’s Rail Role Would Use U.S. Labor

Friday, June 24, 2011

Nearly 150 years ago America built the first transcontinental railroad, and 10,000 Chinese laborers used pickaxes to cut tunnels and rail-lines for just $30 per month. Now, President Obama is promoting high-speed rail, and the Chinese are again involved.  This time, though, they don't just want to swing an axe.  They want to design and part-fund it and have Americans provide the labor. Alastair Leithead, a reporter with the BBC, has been looking at the story for their series "Power of Asia." We also hear from Brian Leung, an associate professor of creative writing at University of Louisville, the author of "Take Me Home" a book about Chinese Americans in the nineteenth century.

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The Takeaway

Famed Chinese Artist and Dissident, Ai Weiwei, Released from Prison

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Almost three months after his arrest in April, world-renowned artist and social activist Ai Weiwei was released Wednesday on bail from prison in China. Ai was arrested on charges of tax evasion during a crackdown on human rights activists, and has not commented on the government or his arrest since yesterday. He is perhaps best known for his design of the "Bird's Nest" stadium at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

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Features

Museums, Artists and Activists Relieved at the Release of Ai Weiwei

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

The controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was released on bail on Wednesday after he confessed to tax evasion. The news has come as a relief to many artists, public officials, museums and fans.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Being Detained in China: Ai Weiwei and Others

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

The AP is reporting that outspoken artist Ai Weiwei has been freed on bail by Chinese activists. Josh Markel, artist and organizer of a vigil tomorrow for Weiwei, and Phelim Kine, Asia researcher at Human Rights Watch, discuss his work and imprisonment, and the overall spike in detentions in China.

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Features

Chinese Artist and Activist Ai Weiwei Released on Bail

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

The controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was released on bail on Wednesday after he confessed to tax evasion. The Chinese State Media news agency reported that the artist's good attitude, willingness to pay his allegedly evaded taxes and poor health were factors in his release. On Thursday at noon, Ai supporters had planned to hold a vigil for the Chinese artist and activist who was detained on April 3 at the Plaza Hotel fountain.

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The Takeaway

In China, Anger and Panic Over Lead Poisoning

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

In China, factory workers and their families are speaking out about a growing public health scandal for the Chinese government. Mass lead poisonings are showing up in factory towns across the country. Lead is showing up in high levels in homes situated near factories, as well as in the blood of factory workers and their families.

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The Takeaway

Violent Protests in Urban China Over Inflation, High Food Prices

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

In May, China's inflation rose to its highest level in nearly three years, up 5.5 percent from the same month last year. There has been a wave of violent unrest in urban areas in China over the past three weeks. The country has repeatedly deployed its massive security forces to contain public anger over economic and political issues. BBC China correspondent Martin Patience reports on how high inflation and extremely high food prices are affecting the country.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

China Development and the Water Problem

Friday, June 10, 2011

Massive development and urbanization are jeopardizing China's water supply. Upmanu Lall, director of the Columbia Water Center and professor of Earth and Environmental Engineering at Columbia University, and Christina Larson, contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine and fellow at the New America Foundation, discuss China's efforts to deal with this challenge, and urbanization and water issues worldwide.

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The Takeaway

China Admits to Building Aircraft Carrier

Thursday, June 09, 2011

The head of China's General Staff of the notoriously secretive People's Liberation Army, General Chen Bingde, has confirmed that the country is building an aircraft carrier. The vessel, a remodeled Soviet-era warship, is expected to be ready for trials at sea later this year. The carrier is symbolic of China's expanding naval power, and possibly of pending territorial disputes in the country's surrounding seas. 

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The Takeaway

Google Blames China for Hacking

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Accounts belonging to hundreds of Gmail users, including U.S. government officials and political activists in in China, were hacked. Google has said that the hacking originated in China. The Chinese government has categorically denied any involvement with the hacking. However, China is paying attention to "information warfare," says Jeremy Goldkorn, who works for Danwei, a site that monitors the media in China.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Henry Kissinger on China

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Dr. Henry Kissinger discusses China, a country he has known intimately for decades, and whose modern relations with the West he helped shape.  In On China, he draws on historical records as well as his conversations with Chinese leaders over the past 40 years to examine how China has approached diplomacy, strategy, and negotiation throughout its history, and reflects on the consequences for the global balance of power in the 21st century.

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The Takeaway

Henry Kissinger Interview Part 1: China

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Dr. Henry Kissinger served as U.S. Secretary of State from 1973 to 1977. He discusses his work as the first American diplomat to enter China in 1971 after 25 years of little contact. Kissinger worked to build bilateral relations between the two countries. His new book "On China" looks at the past, present and future of a nation that is still a mystery to many of us.

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The Takeaway

Henry Kissinger Interview Part 2: China and Vietnam

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

China has existed as an independent state for close to 4,000 years. After a decline in the 20th Century, the large nation has risen to the ranks of a global superpower in recent decades, replacing the USSR as U.S. rival; but it has also been a partner. Many would argue that Dr. Henry Kissinger is the man to thank for China's current relationship with the West, and particularly the U.S. He joins us for more on that subject and his new book "On China," and also admits to mistakes in strategy by the Nixon Administration on the war in Vietnam.

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The Takeaway

US, China Talk Trade and Currencies

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Government officials from both countries met this week in Washington for the third U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue. China asked the U.S to lead an international economic recovery, but it may have been a hard sell considering that China's trade statistics, also released this week, show the country's exports hitting record levels, but its imports lagging. China's trade surplus from the first quarter of 2011 is at $11.43 billion — fueling concerns by the U.S. and other countries that China is using its weak currency to claim a large share of global job creation. The U.S. pushed China to appreciate its currency, and support the flow of American imports to China.

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WNYC News

Financial 411: U.S., China Talk Economics

Monday, May 09, 2011

The world's two economic superpowers are meeting to discuss everything from deficits to environmental issues. We'll talk about what to expect from this round of U.S-China talks.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

On Ai Weiwei

Friday, May 06, 2011

Evan Osnos, staff writer for The New Yorker in Beijing, discusses Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei, who has been detained by the Chinese government since  April 3, 2011, and why it matters.

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Talk to Me

Talk to Me: China in Two Acts

Thursday, May 05, 2011

China watchers and writers Ian Buruma, Yan Lianke, Linda Polman, David Rieff, and Zha Jianying spoke at the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature to discuss human rights in China at the Great Hall at Cooper Union.

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Features

Bloomberg Says Unveiling of Ai Weiwei's 'Zodiac Heads' is 'Bittersweet'

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Mayor Michael Bloomberg spoke at the opening of Ai Weiwei's "Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads" on Wednesday morning. Under a steady rain, 12 figures from the city's arts community read the words of the detained Chinese artist to protesters, fans and the media.

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