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Connected by a 'River of Smoke': Amitav Ghosh and Jonathan Spence at The Asia Society

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

The Asia Society inaugurated its new Asian Arts & Ideas series this month with “The ‘Chindia’ Dialogues." Listen to a conversation between historian Jonathan Spence and the Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The U.S. and China

Friday, November 18, 2011

Chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, David Sanger, discusses the U.S. stance toward China and what the announcement that there will be a permanent U.S. Marine base in Australia has to do with it. 

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The Takeaway

US to Station Troops in Australia, Reasserting Presence in Pacific

Thursday, November 17, 2011

During a visit to Australian on Wednesday, President Obama announced that 2,500 U.S. troops will be sent to the country to boost security in the Pacific region. The move is seen as a strategy to counter China's increased influence. He spoke strongly on China's rising responsibilities and the U.S. perspective on its growing strength. China responded by saying that it "may not be quite appropriate" to expand U.S. military in the region.

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The Takeaway

David Henry Hwang on His New Play 'Chinglish'

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Perhaps this has happened to you before. You’ve said something that someone misunderstood — with or without a translator. Due to culture, language, or even gender, a statement like "I appreciate your frankness" comes across as "I enjoy your rudeness." The new play, "Chinglish" pays tribute to, and pokes fun at, these moments when something gets lost in translation. The play is in both Mandarin and English. And because the show has subtitles similar to those at the opera, the audience is fully in on all the jokes, even when the mono-lingual characters are not. 

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The Takeaway

China Becomes Target at GOP Debate

Monday, November 14, 2011

President Obama begun a tour of the Pacific Rim with a stop in his home state of Hawaii over the weekend, where he met with leaders from the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation. There are 21 countries in APEC, and the president is using this opportunity to stress the importance of America's relationship with countries in Eastern Asian — most importantly, China. But while President Obama is shaking hands with Chinese President Hu Jintao, GOP candidates here at home having been calling China the bad guy.

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Features

NYC Galleries Show Ai Weiwei's Work while Donations in China Pour In

Monday, November 07, 2011

In New York, two galleries have turned their gaze to the work of the controversial Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Meanwhile, from his home in Beijing, the artist has received more than $800,000 in donations from supporters.

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Features

A Journey to Chindia at the Asia Society

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

To explore the sometimes problematic confluence of the two countries, The Asia Society will launch its new Asian Arts & Ideas series with a forum called “The ‘Chindia’ Dialogues” on Thursday. The talks run through Sunday.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Bicycling on the Rise in China, NYC May Update Ancient Parking Zoning Rules

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Top stories on TN:

The ARC tunnel dispute fueled rancor between NJ Governor Christie and the Obama administration. (Link)

Why is it going to take 8 months to put more L trains into service? The MTA and transit union blame each other. (Link)

Special parking for car share programs is being piloted in San Francisco. (Link)

Rand Paul: forget beautification, spend money on fixing infrastructure beasts. (Link)

Questions about subway service? Call 511 (photo by Kate Hinds)

Want to reach New York's MTA? Dial 511. (NY Observer)

Bicycling is on the rise in China. (NPR)

NYC may be getting ready to update the ancient zoning rules regulating parking spaces in the outer boroughs. (Crain's NY)

NJ Transit approved the $95 million settlement with the federal government over the canceled ARC tunnel. (AP via NJ.com)

A look at email correspondence between opponents of a Brooklyn bike lane, pre-lawsuit. (Streetsblog)

Virginia governor: EPA regulations are "job-killing." (WAMU)

NY Daily News editorial: MTA inspector general must investigate LIRR service disruptions, emergency responses.

The head of the Chicago Transit Authority blames the union for the agency's $277 million gap; the union says 'it's not us.' (WBEZ)

 

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The Takeaway

Senate Passes Bill to Alter China's Currency Practices

Monday, October 03, 2011

Senate leaders say the Chinese government's practice of forcing the value of the Yuan artificially low, in comparison to the U.S. dollar, gives Chinese companies an unfair advantage in trade, and is harming the American job market. To combat this, the Senate has passed a bipartisan bill, which the White House is reviewing, to pressure Beijing to alleviate some of those financial controls.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Burma and the New Crossroads of Asia

Monday, September 26, 2011

Thant Myint-U describes the remote region suddenly a geopolitical center of the world—Burma, where Asia’s great powers appear to be vying for supremacy. Where China Meets India: Burma and the New Crossroads of Asia looks at the ways China and India are becoming exposed to each other as never before, and how the basic shift in geography will lead to unprecedented connections among the three billion people of Southeast Asia and the Far East.

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The Takeaway

The Future of Opera Could Be in China

Monday, September 05, 2011

Most of us think of opera as a traditionally Western art. Historically, the best composers wrote in French, Italian, German or English — until now. Over the past decade, the Chinese government has devoted millions to new opera houses, opera festivals and music education. The Chinese investment in opera has piqued the interest of classical music students here in the U.S., where budget-cutting has sapped funding for the arts.

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The Takeaway

Adopted Chinese Children Learn About Their Roots on 'Heritage Tour'

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Official statistics show that since 1999 over 64,000 Chinese babies, most of them girls, have been adopted by Americans. China’s one child policy has caused an increase in the number of children abandoned, many of whom end up in orphanages. But China has changed a great deal in the last two decades, and so has its attitude towards adoption. The Chinese government recently paid for 90 adopted Chinese children and their families to travel from the U.S. to the country of their birth on a "heritage tour" — billed as an opportunity for these children to learn more about their roots.

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The Takeaway

China May Have Examined Stealth US Helicopter

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

U.S. officials believe Pakistan may have allowed China to study and take samples of the stealth helicopter that crashed during the Osama bin Laden raid in May, before they returned it to the U.S. If the allegations are true, it continues a long history of China trying to obtain U.S. military secrets. How will this latest story affect relations not only between China and the U.S., but between the U.S. and Pakistan?

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The Takeaway

China and the US: An Economic Turning Point?

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Yesterday, U.S. Treasury secretary Timothy Geithner spoke by phone with his Chinese counterpart, Vice Premier Wang Qishan, to discuss the challenges facing global markets after a tumultuous week for the U.S. economy. China's stock market plunged on Monday (along with the U.S.'s), following the news that Standard and Poor downgraded America's credit rating. Chinese investors are concerned that the current poor economic climate in the U.S. will lead to decreased demand for Chinese exports. China is the largest U.S. foreign creditor, but over the weekend on Chinese websites many people were calling for China to invest less money in the U.S.

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The Takeaway

Markets React to Better Than Expected Jobs Report

Friday, August 05, 2011

The stock market opened higher than expected this morning, as markets reacted to the strongest jobs report since April. A report from the Labor Department showing that the economy added 117,000 jobs in July, bringing the unemployment rate down to 9.1 percent is buffering the U.S. stock market so far against the sharp sell offs around the globe yesterday. Yesterday was the worst day on Wall Street in three years.

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On The Media

"Whether you believe it or not, I believe it."

Friday, July 29, 2011

Two high speed trains collided on a bridge in China recently, causing six carriages to fall off the tracks and onto a farm below. Immediately, passengers began using a Twitter-esque site to describe what happened. The Chinese government has gone to lengths to try to cover up the severity of the accident.  Some even believe they tried to literally bury one of the carriages with dirt.  Danwei.org founder Jeremy Goldkorn talks with Bob from Beijing.  Goldkorn says, so far, social media has beaten back government propaganda.

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Features

Outspoken Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei's 'Zodiac Heads' to be Taken Down

Friday, July 15, 2011

Ai's Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads will be taken down from the fountain in front of the Plaza Hotel on Friday, according to the artist's gallery because it's the end of the exhibit's run in the city. The New York stop was part of a world tour for the Zodiac Heads, which will be installed in Los Angeles next month.

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The Takeaway

China Weighs in on Debt Debate; Anyone Can Be a 'Budget Hero'

Friday, July 15, 2011

China is weighing in on U.S. lawmakers' failure to make any meaningful progress on the government debt limit, during increasingly tense budget talks in the White House. China holds more than $1 trillion in U.S. Treasury securities, and a failure to reach a debt agreement would result in a credit downgrade for the United States, and devalue China’s holdings.

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The Takeaway

Former Chinese Leader Jiang Zemin Rumored to Be Dead

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Chinese state media is denying reports this morning that Jiang Zemin is dead. The 84-year-old became China's leader in 1989, and shepherded the country through its unprecedented economic boom before handing power to President Hu Jintao between 2002 and 2004. The BBC is reporting that internet searches for Jiang's name have been blocked. Martin Patience, correspondent for the BBC, reports on the latest from Beijing.

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It's A Free Country ®

Kissinger On China

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

I basically believe that societies grow and become great not by their conflicts but by their reconciliations. And I'm hoping that at some point the leadership of both parties will agree not just on what concessions they need to make but what picture of America they want to support.

Henry Kissinger, former U.S. Secretary of State and National Security Adviser on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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