Streams

 

China

The Takeaway

The Great Game for Influence Over Central Asia

Monday, July 30, 2012

Two centuries ago, Russia and Britain fought a war of influence over a region that rarely makes headlines: Central Asia. Today, a new game of influence is taking place in that same region, this time between the U.S., Russia and China. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Friday, July 27, 2012

Director Alison Klayman discusses her documentary “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry,” an up-close look at renowned Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei and his ongoing battle with the Chinese government. Ai Weiwei is China's most celebrated contemporary artist, who helped design Beijing’s Bird’s Nest Olympic Stadium, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship, Ai has become a kind of Internet champion, using his blog and Twitter stream to organize, inform, and inspire his followers, becoming an underground hero to millions of Chinese citizens. “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry” opens July 27 at the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas and IFC Center.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Chinese Media

Monday, July 23, 2012

In the West, the Chinese media is often used as an example of government propaganda and censorship. Fred Teng, CEO of NewsChina, and Rong Xiaoqing, reporter for Sing Tao Daily, talk about the myth and reality of the Chinese media both in China and around the world. 

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New Sounds

Reflections of China

Thursday, July 19, 2012

For this New Sounds, listen to music inspired by the image of the plum blossom, China, or variations on the plum blossom. Hear a surprising acoustic piece by Greek composer Vangelis, also known for scoring "Chariots of Fire," from a 30 year old recording, "China." Also, Grammy Award winning composer, reed virtuoso and jazz master Yusef Lateef takes on the piece with Chinese globular flute.

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The Takeaway

Growing Pressure with Chinese Government Begins to Boil

Monday, July 16, 2012

Two months ago, Chinese civil rights activist and law student Chen Guangcheng escaped house arrest and found refuge at the American embassy in Beijing. Shortly thereafter, he and his family were granted visas to travel to New York. The focus on Chen and the Chinese government continues, leaving the country in a vulnerable position to many unanswered questions.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Left behind in Japan and China

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Left behind in Japan and China

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New Sounds

Global Collaborations

Thursday, July 12, 2012

This New Sounds program highlights some unexpected global collaborations- including but not limited to- Uzbeki bluegrass, musicians based in Italy who meld North African and Bollywood music, and Mardi Gras marching bands coupled with Argentinean tango flair. Listen to a Creole tango from the Boston-based Revolutionary Snake Ensemble, who regularly ride the party train down to Mardi Gras in New Orleans. 

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Transportation Nation

China Not Treating U.S. Automakers Fairly, Says Obama Administration

Thursday, July 05, 2012

Shanghai traffic (photo by http2007 via flickr)

The United States filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization over what it says are unfair trade practices for imposing new duties on American-made cars.

According to the complaint, which was filed by the United States Trade Representative on Thursday, "the United States has requested dispute settlement consultations with China at the WTO in an attempt to eliminate these unfair duties."

Last year, Beijing imposed import tariffs ranging from 2 percent to 21.5 percent on larger cars and SUVs exported from the U.S. In 2011, the U.S. exported more than $3 billion of these automobiles to China.

China has argued that General Motors and Chrysler have benefited from government subsidies, enabling the companies to sell cars at less than fair market value -- thereby hurting the Chinese auto industry.

Word of the complaint came as President Obama kicked off a two-day bus tour of Pennsylvania and Ohio. Ohio, a swing state, is home to thousands of auto workers.

"Americans aren't afraid to compete," said the president, speaking at a campaign event in Maumee (OH).  "We believe in competition. I believe in trade...so as long as we're competing on a fair playing field instead of an unfair playing field, we'll do just fine. But we're going to make sure that competition is fair."

White House spokesperson Jay Carney noted that this is the seventh such action taken against China, and denied the timing behind the announcement was politically motivated. "The fact is this is an action that has been in development for quite a long time." he said. "It simply can’t suddenly be a political action because it happens during the campaign."

China's once-booming auto industry is decelerating due to its slowing economy -- and its government's own efforts to get a handle on traffic. Earlier this month, Guangzhou became the third Chinese city to put a cap on annual car sales to combat growing traffic jams and pollution.

You can read a copy of the letter the USTR sent the WTO here.

 

 

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

The US and China: Prospects of the world's largest economies

Thursday, July 05, 2012

The US and China: Prospects of the world's largest economies

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The Takeaway

Gov. Jon Huntsman on China and Campaigning for President

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

In January this year, Gov. Jon Huntsman announced he was leaving the Republican presidential primary and endorsing Mitt Romney. Since then, the former ambassador to China has visited Asia, and as the economic crisis in Europe worsens, Gov. Huntsman has been keeping a close eye on U.S.-China relations.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Putin's agenda for Russia

Thursday, June 07, 2012

Putin's agenda for Russia

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Culture, Communism, and China's Modern Consumer

Friday, June 01, 2012

China expert Tom Doctoroff discusses what makes China tick, and how the country’s distinguishing traits define and explain the country. In What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism and China's Modern Consumer, Doctoroff looks at the impulses and conflicts within Chinese civilization.

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On The Media

Chinese Censorship Gets Complicated

Friday, June 01, 2012

Chinese censorship is nothing new. But recently the relationship between censor and dissident has grown more complicated as the government comes to accept that social media is no longer something it can simply take away from Chinese citizens. Brooke speaks with Slate's Jacob Weisberg, who recently traveled to China and spoke with some tech-savvy new dissidents.

 

Lit - My Own Worst Enemy

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On The Media

Hollywood Goes to China

Friday, June 01, 2012

China is increasing its number of movie theatres and the number of American films that can be shown in them.  And China is already the second largest market for American films in the world.  So Hollywood is anxious to take full advantage of China’s potential and is busy making, and changing, its fare to appease the notoriously sensitive Chinese government.  Bob talks to USC professor Stanley Rosen about what Hollywood's appeasement of China looks like at the movies.

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It's A Free Country ®

No Regrets About Serving for Obama, Huntsman Says

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

A former candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, whose campaign was perceived to be negatively affected by the fact he served in the Obama administration, said he had no regrets about crossing party lines.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

China Airborne

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

James Fallows discusses China’s plan to expand its airlines, build more airports, and jump-start its aerospace industry. In China Airborne, he shows the extraordinary scale of this project and explains why it is a crucial test case for China’s hopes for modernization and innovation in other industries.

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The Takeaway

Chinese Conglomerate to Become Largest Movie Theater Operator in America

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

A Chinese conglomerate is set to become the largest movie theater operator in the United States. The Wanda Group, a Chinese company with extensive interests in the entertainment business, has agreed to acquire AMC Entertainment and its 5,000 movie screens across North America. Phil Levy discusses the acquisition's implications on the American entertainment industry and talks about whether other American industries are preparing for significant Chinese investments.

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The Takeaway

Chen Guangcheng's Impact from Abroad

Monday, May 21, 2012

Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng arrived in New York to a throng of cheering supporters on Saturday. He will soon begin a fellowship at New York University Law School's U.S.-Asia Law Institute, and he spoke to the crowd at NYU about his plight: "After much turbulence, I have come out of Shandong," he said, through an interpreter. "This is thanks to the assistance of many friends." Bob Fu is a Chinese human rights activist and pastor, living in the United States. He was instrumental in publicizing Chen Guangcheng's case and helped negotiate his release.

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The Takeaway

Behind the Scenes Diplomacy for Chen Guangcheng

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Blind Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng's daring escape from house arrest late last month set off a round of diplomatic tug-of-war between Chinese and American officials attempting to conduct high level strategic talks. After at first agreeing to stay in China, Chen changed his mind, publicly declaring his desire to leave the country last week. Details of Chen’s travels to the U.S. have not been finalized, but behind the scenes, intense negotiations and preparations continue. Jerome Cohen has been working to help make arrangements for Chen to travel to the US to study at NYU, and has been in touch with Chen regularly.

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The Takeaway

Chen Guangcheng: The Emblem of a New Kind of Dissent in China?

Friday, May 04, 2012

With all eyes now on Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng, we're taking a closer look at his particular brand of dissent. Rather than calling for an overhaul of the government system, he is striving to make reforms within the current structure. Jonathan Fenby is an expert on China. His latest book on China is called "Tiger Head, Snake Tails: China Today." P.J. Crowley is former assistant secretary of state for public affairs. He is now a professor at George Washington University.

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