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Children

The Leonard Lopate Show

“The Touch-Screen Generation”

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Hanna Rosin, contributor to The Atlantic, looks at why young children—even toddlers—are spending more and more time with digital technology. Thousands of apps appealing to kids are released every year. In her article “The Touch-Screen Generation,” in the April issue of The Atlantic, she raises questions about the long-term cultural effects of extended screen time.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Iraq Today, Sustainable Architecture, Kids and Screens

Thursday, March 21, 2013

We wrap up our three-day series to mark the tenth anniversary of the invasion of Iraq with a look at the impact the war has had both on the soldiers who have fought in it and Iraq’s environment. Architect Bjarke Ingels explains “hedonistic sustainability.” American Book Award-winner Mackenzie Bezos on her new novel, Traps. We’ll find out about the microbial life that scientists have discovered over 6 miles beneath the ocean’s surface. And, Hanna Rosin looks at whether apps geared toward kids are educational or are just teaching kids how to zone out.

Radiolab

When Sleep is a Battleground

Friday, March 15, 2013

When producer Hannah Palin recorded her infant sleep journal for our Sleep episode, I wasn’t yet a parent. I listened to it, and while I felt sympathy for her predicament, it didn’t raise any kind of anguished emotional response. But now, I feel sick to my stomach when ...

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Radiolab

How Do You Fall Asleep?

Friday, March 15, 2013

Take our informal sleep survey, and if you've got some friendly advice on how to drift off, don't keep it to yourself!

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WNYC News

Report: Child Well Being Depends on Where You Live

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

More children are living in poverty and more families are struggling to pay unaffordable rents, according to Citizens Committee for Children.  And while the city is doing better in some areas, like lower infant mortality and better test scores, some neighborhoods in the city have been completely bypassed by these trends.

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The Takeaway

A Teenage Girl's Perspective on the Culture of Online Slut-Shaming

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

Temitayo Fagbenle is sixteen-years-old, and like a lot of teenagers, she sees a lot of images online that fall squarely under the definition of sexual cyberbullying; or in layman’s terms: slut shaming. They're photos of girls in various states of undress, often taken by their own boyfriends, and then posted on Facebook, Twitter, and elsewhere.

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WNYC News

Escaping Gang Violence, Growing Number of Teens Cross Border

Friday, December 28, 2012

The number of children who came to the United States from Central America has significantly increased this year. Among them were two siblings who left El Salvador and found their way to Long Island.

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The Takeaway

Is Empathy Inherited or Taught? Listeners Respond

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Is empathy inherited? Is it taught? Dr. Perri Klass shared her thoughts and recent findings with the Takeaway and listeners are sharing their opinions.

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Radiolab

Repeat After Me

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Writer Elizabeth Giddens answers a listener's question about toddlers by pondering repetition, and how all sorts of activities seem to have a Goldilocks amount that's just right...and a "too much" threshold where things can turn transcendent, or get very troubling.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Children Succeed

Friday, November 23, 2012

Many believe a child’s success is based on intelligence and that those who score highest on tests, from preschool admissions to SATs, will succeed in school and in life. Paul Tough argues that the qualities that matter most have more to do with character: perseverance, curiosity, conscientiousness, optimism, and self-control. In How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, he writes of researchers and educators who are using new tools to develop character, uncovers the ways in which parents do—and do not—prepare their children for adulthood, and he and he looks at ways to help children growing up in poverty.

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Radiolab

Inheritance

Monday, November 19, 2012

Stories of nature and nurture slamming into each other, & shaping our biological blueprints.

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Radiolab

What If There Was No Destiny?

Monday, November 19, 2012

When Barbara Harris was 37, she started wishing she could have a daughter. It was 1989, and by that time only two of her six sons were still at home. So she filled out all the paperwork, and later that summer got a call about an 8-month-old ...

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Soundcheck

Hearing 'Free To Be... You And Me' For The Very First Time

Thursday, November 15, 2012

As the adage goes, "a lady never reveals her age." But then again, terms like "lady" aren't really all that welcome in the world of Free To Be… You And Me, so I'm just going to come out and say it: I'm 26 years old. I was born 14 years after the 1972 release of the feminist children's album that we've been talking about all week on Soundcheck. As a result, I had never even heard of Free To Be until a few weeks ago.

From what I remember, my favorite children's music pretty much avoided the issue of gender entirely, singing instead about animals. There was Raffi's "Baby Beluga," a song about an adventuresome whale that's never identified as a boy or girl, and Red Grammer's non-gendered cows and ducks and coyotes that all had a "Place In The Choir." My favorite cassette tape included a song about a stereotypically male farmer who had 500 sheep, but it was in French. And since I didn’t speak French, well, I had no idea what was going on. 

However, as a little girl who was raised in a non-feminist household -- and who gravitated naturally toward the girliest of the girly things in life -- I also listened to plenty of Disney music, with all of its poofy dress-wearing princesses and heteronormative values. But despite a lack of childhood exposure to message-driven music like that on the album Free To Be… You And Me, it was always very clear to me that I could grow up to be anything: a doctor, a lawyer, a musician, whatever. And I also knew that it was really fun to play California Barbie Hot Dog Stand (yes, you read that right) with the little boy from down the street practically every afternoon. He seemed to think it was fine and dandy too. 

When I did finally get around to listening to Free To Be just a couple of weeks ago, I was initially struck by how much the sound reminded me of the music from Sesame Street. That makes sense, because the album was produced by Carole Hart -- who, along with her husband Bruce Hart, worked on Sesame Street -- and some of its composers, like Stephen Lawrence, also worked on the show.

I was also quickly impressed by how the album balanced silliness with forthrightness, something that was perhaps lacking in my own animal-heavy childhood music experience. (Seriously, what's up with that?) The spoken word track "Boy Meets Girl," in which two babies (played by Marlo Thomas and Mel Brooks) meet in a hospital nursery and discuss whether they might be boys or girls, is hilarious. But it's also a very direct look at male/female stereotypes. I can't recall anything quite like it from my own childhood. 

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Soundcheck

The People Behind The Music Of 'Free To Be...'

Thursday, November 15, 2012

The conclusion of our three-part series focuses on the music heard on the 40-year-old album.

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Soundcheck

'Free To Be' Anything You Want To Be (Almost)

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Part two of our three-part series on "Free to Be... You and Me" looks at the album's gender-neutral messaging and its limitations.

 

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Soundcheck

When We Were 'Free To Be'

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Part one of a three-part series on the 40-year-old children's album and book Free to Be... You and Me.

Comments [14]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sandy Update + Still at Home with the Kids

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

First WNYC's Richard Hake gives an update on the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy and we hear from some listeners about what's happening where they are.

Then, Leslie Bushara, Deputy Director for Education and Guest Services at the Children's Museum of Manhattan checks in with us about making it through day three at home with your children. She’ll let us know how to look on the bright side, how to get your kids involved with helping others, and how to make the most of this time. We’re taking your calls at 646-829-3980!

Parents: how have you been faring stuck inside with your kids? Do you have advice for other parents? Let us know!

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Stuck Inside with Children

Monday, October 29, 2012

Leslie Bushara, Deputy Director for Education and Guest Services at the Children's Museum of Manhattan,gives some advice about how to keep your children entertained and occupied while you're holed up inside during the storm. We're taking calls at 212-433-9692!

What are you doing with your kids today? Do you have advice for other parents? Let us know by leaving a comment!

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Radiolab

Mice Puppets and Souls

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Lulu Miller ponders the idea of an afterlife, by way of a puppet show designed by psychologists...and some early childhood lessons about peek-a-boo and how the world works.

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Transportation Nation

Arlington Schools Not Backing Down On New Busing Rules

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

(image by Adam Fagen via flickr)

(Patrick Madden - Washington, DC, WAMU) Hundreds of parents in Virginia's Arlington County are appealing a new policy that will likely force more than 1,000 children who used to take the bus to school to walk instead this year.

Arlington schools plan to strictly enforce a walking zone for students, reports the Washington Post. That means elementary students living within a mile of school and secondary students within 1.5 miles of school aren't eligible for busing.

When the school system spelled out plans in August, many parents were angry, and 200 of them filed appeals. But only a few of those appeals have been successful, an ACPS spokeswoman told the Post. Donna Owens, the mother of a sixth grader, told the newspaper that many children will have to cross busy roads to get to school.

School officials argue they're addressing growing enrollment, because the bus system was reaching a crisis. There are an additional 1,000 students enrolled in the county's schools this year, according to Superintendent Patrick Murphy.

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