Streams

 

Chemistry

The Leonard Lopate Show

Tribute: Carl Djerassi

Thursday, February 05, 2015

Carl Djerassi once described himself as an “intellectual polygamist,” but he may be best known as the chemist who created the birth control pill.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Science of Booze

Friday, June 13, 2014

We're familiar with its effects. But what's the magical chemistry behind fermented beverages? And what in the world goes into a "Corpse Reviver #2?"

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Radiolab

A Flash Freeze, In High-Def

Monday, March 17, 2014

Not only did we get to see water freeze into ice instantaneously, Rockefeller University set it up like a Vogue fashion shoot.

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Radiolab

Jad Grows Ice, With One Finger

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Okay, so it's not reallllllyyy ice, as you know ice to be.

 

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Comments [6]

Radiolab

Banana Hammer

Thursday, March 13, 2014

What do you do when you have 20 minutes to kill while waiting for water to supercool?

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Radiolab

Super Cool

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

What do frozen horses and a scorching universe have in common? That's what we wanted to know.

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Comments [80]

Radiolab

The Sludge at the Bottom of the Sea

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Whatever happened to all that poop New York City dumped out in the ocean?

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Comments [15]

Life of the Law

Forensics in Flames

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Over the past 20 years, there’s been a revolution in the science of arson investigations. Many of the clues that had been used for decades to determine that a fire was not accidental, especially the analysis of burn patterns on walls and floors,

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Radiolab

The Power of Coffee is Not in the Cup

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

To answer a listener's foodie questions, Molly Webster dives deep into the least likely part of your morning coffee ... the stain it leaves behind.

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The Takeaway

David Pogue on 'Hunting the Elements'

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

Popular science is more popular than ever. Its subjects also seem more rarefied than ever: string theory, theoretical physics, theoretical astrophysics. Whatever happened to the more tangible natural sciences? The ones we all think we know — chemistry, for example. We all remember studying the periodic table of the elements in high school, maybe even in college, but do we remember what it all meant? Do we understand what the elements do — and what they can do?

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Radiolab

How do you solve a problem like Fritz Haber?

Monday, January 09, 2012

How do you square the idea of a bad person who does great good? Or a good person who does terrible harm? Sam Kean introduces us to the confusing life story of Fritz Haber. Around 1900, Haber was a young chemist in Germany, intent on solving the biggest problem facing ...

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The Takeaway

Adventures in 'Tomatoland'

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Author Barry Estabrook decided to write about tomatoes because they almost killed him. He was driving in Naples, Fla. when a few tomatoes bounced off the cargo truck in front of him, narrowly missing his windshield. At the next stoplight, he was amazed to see that the tomatoes littering the street were unscathed after falling off a truck that was traveling at 60 miles per hour. How did the tomato— once summer’s tastiest treat — become the bland specimens available in most grocery stores now? And how can we fix it?

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Radiolab

Mirror, Mirror

Monday, April 18, 2011

The mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson posed a big question about mirrors in one of his best-known books: Through the Looking-Glass (yup, Dodgson's pen name was Lewis Carroll). Natasha Gostwick of Storynory reads an excerpt that gets at the heart of the trouble: is mirror milk any good to drink? ...

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Radiolab

Desperately Seeking Symmetry

Monday, April 18, 2011

From hair parts to the origin of the universe, how symmetry shapes our existence.

Comments [140]

The Takeaway

Hugh Aldersey-Williams on 'Periodic Tales'

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Remember the periodic table? With its 92 elements and perplexing abbreviations? No doubt, you had to memorize portions of the table back in high school. But beyond high school classes and chemistry jobs, why should we care about the elements?

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The Takeaway

Tears: More Than Meets the Eye

Friday, January 07, 2011

Scientists have long wondered why humans are the only species that cries for emotional reasons. It turns out that our tears may convey much more than just sadness, grief or anger. In a new study, scientists have proved that more complicated chemical reactions may be at play, like subduing male arousal.

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The Takeaway

Around the World, Phony Drugs Infiltrate Pharmacies

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

The World Health Organization reports that one in four pharmaceuticals are fake. The problem hits home in the developing world, where scant regulation lets useless and sometimes dangerous medicine land on store shelves. Some of the drugs most commonly faked are malaria medications. Such scamming can lead to drug resistance, scary side effects, and even death. Here to talk about his job using chemistry to ID fake pharmaceuticals is Facundo M. Fernandez, a Chemistry Professor at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Radiolab

The Wonder of Youth

Monday, January 12, 2009

At the age of thirteen, mathematician Steve Strogatz was astonished to find that pendulums and water fountains had a strange relationship that had previously been completely hidden from him.

And as a young boy, neurologist and author Oliver Sacks pored over the pages of ...

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Radiolab

Yellow Fluff and Other Curious Encounters

Monday, January 12, 2009

Stories of love and loss in the name of science.

Comments [46]