Streams

 

Chavez

The New Yorker: Political Scene

Jon Lee Anderson and John Cassidy on Hugo Chavez's legacy.

Friday, March 08, 2013

Jon Lee Anderson and John Cassidy on Hugo Chavez's legacy.

Comment

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Chavismo after Hugo Chavez?

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Chavismo after Hugo Chavez?

Comment

The Takeaway

Chavez's Death Leaves A Divided Venezuela

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Hugo Chavez, Venezuela’s deeply polarizing president, died Tuesday.  He was 58. His death leaves open questions about the future of the country-- and about the real impact of his legacy. Hannah Strange is Latin American Correspondent for the London Times; Phil Gunson is a Caracas based freelance journalist, who writes for The Economist; and Elio Aponte is founder of the Organizacion de Venezolanos en Exilo.

Comments [2]

World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Hugo Chavez returns to power

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Hugo Chavez returns to power

Comment

WNYC News

Venezuelans Flock To New York to Cast Their Vote

Sunday, October 07, 2012

A chilly rain didn't stop hundreds of Venezuelans from gathering to vote in their country's presidential election.

Comment

The Takeaway

Where is Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez?

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Hugo Chavez hasn't been seen in public for weeks, reportedly due to mysterious health issues he developed while traveling, forcing him to undergo emergency surgery in Havana, Cuba. This week, his absence led to the postponement of a summit of Latin American leaders that was scheduled to take place next week. Chavez was expected to host the summit, on the 200th anniversary from Venezeula's independence from Spain. The last photo of Chavez was released on Tuesday, and showed him in Cuba chatting with former leader Fidel Castro. 

Comment

The Takeaway

Critics wary as President Obama reaches out to Venezuela's Hugo Chavez

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

President Obama is signaling a new era of diplomacy with two Latin American nations long considered troublesome for American interests, namely Venezuela and Cuba. President Obama has called for open dialogue with Cuba and has said that "The policy that we've had in place for 50 years hasn't worked the way we want it to. The Cuban people are not free." Then Mr. Obama engaged with Mr. Chavez in a seemingly friendly way, despite criticizing Chavez's policies and anti-U.S. rhetoric. While some critics have accused Mr. Obama of coddling Venezuela, he dismissed such accusations.

But what are the pros and cons of engagement with these two countries, which were the focus of a very different kind of diplomacy under President Bush? To help answer these questions, we turn to former Ambassador Otto Reich, who was the U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela for President Reagan and a former senior Special Envoy and diplomat under Reagan and both G.W. and G.H.W. Bush administrations.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Hugo Chavez, President for life

Monday, February 16, 2009

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has won a controversial referendum that allows him to stand for re-election for his third term in office and since few candidates are willing to run against him, it may be permanent. Chavez would like to stay in office beyond his second term to secure his so-called Venezuelan socialist revolution. As Venezuelans voted yesterday to lift term limits, Chavez will most likely get his wish. For more we’re joined by the BBC’s Latin American analyst, James Painter.

A high point of Chavez's international career:

Comment

The Takeaway

Hugo Chavez humbled in the face of falling gas prices, maybe

Thursday, January 15, 2009

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez is a frequent (and loud) critic of the United States. Despite his dislike for the country, the nationalized oil business that props up the nation's economy sells billions of dollars of oil to the U.S. Due to Chavez's bombastic personality, many big oil companies don't bother drilling in Venezuela anymore. But now that gas prices have plunged, Chavez is gently cozying up to companies like Chevron and Shell to see if they'd like to return to Venezuela. For more on this turn of events, we are joined by Simon Romero who is covering this story for the New York Times from Caracas, Venezuela.

Read Simon Romero's article, Chávez Allows West to Make Oil Bids as Prices Plunge, in today's New York Times.

The video below is one of Chavez's more outspoken moments at the United Nations.

Comment