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It's A Free Country ®

Low Turnout and Few Challenges in NJ Primary Vote

Monday, June 06, 2011

Tuesday's primary marks the first time voters will be selecting candidates based on the new state district map that tries to incorporate the trends picked up by the 2010 Census. The Census documented a substantial increase in the Hispanic population and a shift of the state's population concentration from north to the south.

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WNYC News

White Population Shrinks as Immigrants Increase in New Jersey Suburbs

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

The six New Jersey counties that lie across the Hudson River from New York are losing white residents, as well as young children and 20- and 30-somethings, according to the latest census data.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Census ReTraction

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Daniel Massey, Crain's New York Business reporter, reports on the city's efforts to correct the 2010 census count. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Raising Manhattanites

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for The New York Times, looks at the new census numbers showing more children under five living in Manhattan, but fewer children city-wide.

»» Check out WNYC's census maps below

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Census Results: What They Say About Queens

Friday, March 25, 2011

John Mollenkopf, director of the Center for Urban Research and Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the CUNY, discusses what the census results reveal about Queens.

→ Listen, Explore Our Interactive Census Maps, Read a Recap, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Japan Trying to Get A Handle on Infrastructure Damage, LA Passes Sweeping Bus Service Cuts, and Boston Band Powers Concerts with Bikes

Friday, March 25, 2011

Nearly two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, engineers still do not know the full extent of damage to roads, bridges, rail lines and other infrastructure. (NY Times)

Meanwhile, Toyota is warning factories and dealers in North America that production delays are coming, while Nissan is looking for ways around its factory closures in Japan by flipping the supply chain around. (Marketplace)

The Los Angeles MTA approved sweeping bus service cuts, eliminating nine lines and reducing 11. Officials say they are still providing adequate service while making the bus system more efficient; critics say L.A.'s low-income residents will be hurt the most. (Los Angeles Times)

WNYC looks at the 2010 New York census map.

A Boston-based band uses bikes to power their concerts. "One person can sustain about 100 watts without breaking too much of a sweat. Five people can amass enough wattage to power a small live show." (WBUR)

City-funded parking garages at Yankees Stadium have become a "financial swamp for taxpayers," writes a NYDN columnist. "Ever since it opened...two years ago, the 9,000-space parking system has operated at barely 60% capacity, even on game days. Meanwhile, its operating expenses have run twice what was expected."

NJ Transit paid nearly $3.6 million for unused vacation and sick time last year -- even as it raised fares and cut service. Gov. Christie says the agency should go to a 'use it or lose it' policy. (Asbury Park Press)

The Bay Area's Metropolitan Transportation Commission made a $10 million commitment to a new $50 million revolving fund for loaning money to developers to build affordable housing near rail stations and bus stops. (San Jose Mercury News)

The Ohio Senate voted to pass a measure banning signs that tout federal stimulus spending along Ohio's roadways. (AP via BusinessWeek)

Top Transportation Nation stories we're following: As massive bus cuts loom, Long Islanders get emotional at a hearing. A NYC deputy mayor goes on the BL Show to defend the city's bike lane program -- and voice support for the city's transportation commissioner. And: after reports that a former DC Metro employee left the agency to become a lobbyist, the agency's board put the brakes on a contract.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Decline in Auto Manufacturing Costs Detroit 25% of its Population, and Where Does Manhattan's West Side Really End?

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Detroit viewed through a window on the People Mover (Gehad83/Flickr)

The Takeaway looks at how the disaster in Japan is affecting car manufacturing in the US.

And here's how the decline in car manufacturing is affecting the Motor City: New census numbers reveal that one in four Detroiters have moved out. "With 713,777 people, the city reached its lowest count in 100 years, though officials will contest it." (Detroit Free Press)

Seattle City Council is considering a one-year experiment to limit disabled parking in 14 blocks of downtown Seattle. The goal is to create more turnover of parking spaces and minimize disabled parking placard abuse. (Seattle Times)

North Carolina transportation officials announced an agreement that will free up $461 million in federal money to begin modernizing the state’s rail system. (Greensboro News & Record)

Confusion in Manhattan over exactly where the East Side begins and the West Side ends. (Or vice versa.) Surprise: the west side of Fifth Avenue is, technically, the West Side. Even if you're walking along Central Park. (NYT)

"Horrible" transit cuts (15% reduction in service, 29 bus lines eliminated) begin in Pittsburgh this Sunday. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

A NYC councilwoman is introducing a bill today that would restrict vehicles from traveling along the main, 6-mile loop in Central Park and inside Brooklyn's Prospect Park. (NY Post)

The attorney handling the Prospect Park West bike lane lawsuit will be on the Brian Lehrer Show (WNYC) this morning.

Ray LaHood is in Honolulu to report on that city's transit expansion. (KHON)

Watch the NY MTA's monthly board meeting here, starting at 9:15am.

Top Transportation Nation stories we're following: Safety problems are widespread on New York's inter-city bus companies. New York's bridges receive their worst grade ever, and California's aren't too great, either. Airlines carried more passengers in 2010 than they did in 2009, but have yet to fully rebound from the recession. And transit riders love their technology -- at least until someone looks over their shoulder.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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Transportation Nation

California's High-Speed Rail: Census Shows the 'Train To Nowhere' May Actually Be The Train to the Boom Towns

Wednesday, March 09, 2011

(San Francisco -- Casey Miner, KALW News) The new census numbers mean big changes for California politics. Huge population growth in the Central Valley, compared to relatively anemic growth in the coastal cities of Los Angeles and San Francisco, seems likely to shift a good deal of the state's political clout inland to cities like Bakersfield and Fresno. That's also where the first high-speed rail tracks will be laid. What some have called a "train to nowhere" is now a train to the fastest-growing part of the state.

"We're particularly interested to see the growth in these Central Valley cities," said Rachel Wall, a spokeswoman for the California High-Speed Rail Authority. "In Fresno and Bakersfield the populations are increasing, but they're still very isolated as far as accessibility and mobility." Wall added that these cities would be among those who saw the first jobs come from the project.

But Central Valley politicians aren't necessarily buying it.

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It's A Free Country ®

NJ Immigrants Healthier Than Natives

Saturday, March 05, 2011

WNYC

According to the New Jersey Department of Health comparison, New Jersey's immigrants are healthier on average than their native-born neighbors. This analysis comes as the Census shows that immigrants are the biggest segment of growth in the state's population.

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The Takeaway

Re-Defining 'Poor' in America

Thursday, January 06, 2011

What does it mean to be poor in America? For years, the country has had a fairly firm answer; in 2010, the federal government maintains the poverty line at an income of about $21,750 for a family of four. But, if you do the math, you'll likely come up with an inescapable question: how can a family really subsist in America on even twice that amount?

 

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The Takeaway

Your Stories of the Past Ten Years

Thursday, December 23, 2010

We've been poring over the 2010 census results, but dry, statistical information only goes so far. So we've been asking you how your lives have changed over the past 10 years. We've gotten tremendous responses all around, but one from Takeaway listener Heather Hudson really caught our attention. Heather shares her story.

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WNYC News

Redistricting: The Northeast Slide Continues

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Numbers released earlier this week by the U.S. Census Bureau show that the population of the United States continues to shift to the South and West. Based on the census numbers, both New Jersey and New York will have to redraw their Congressional districts.

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The Takeaway

Your Take: 2010 Census

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Yesterday, official data from the 2010 census was released, giving us a closer look at how the country has been changing over the last 10 years. But beyond the official numbers, we wanted to hear from our listeners about how their lives have changed. So we've been asking: how has your life changed in the past 10 years?  You had a lot to say.

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Micropolis

308,745,538 Americans and Other Census News

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Government statisticians may not be born entertainers, but god knows the men and women of the U.S. Census Bureau try. Tuesday's big announcement -- the biggest census event in 10 years -- managed to ramp up the suspense before finally delivering the goods.

How many people live in this country? Which states grew the most? Which states are going to ask for a recount?

Answers forthcoming. But first, a video featuring some of the notables who publicized the Census outreach: Donny Osmond, Dora the Explorer, Karl Rove. They are all America.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Census Releases Numbers

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Angelo Falcón, president and founder of the National Institute for Latino Policy, discusses the national, state, and reapportionment data released by the U.S. Census today.

Read More and Join The Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Census Data Will Adjust Political Landscape

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Data from the 2010 census will be released today, and the results could help give Republicans more seats in the House of Representatives.  For each state, the census data will confirm the total and regional populations, and indicate whether the state will gain or lose representation in the House. At this point, the GOP looks poised to pick up seats in several states.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Census Tracks Large Population Movements, Morning Headlines

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Shifting populations detailed in new Census data also hint at political changes and a different future for some states. As Americans change the location of their homes, the lines of districting also change — and that may be good news for Republicans. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Worst Commute

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for the New York Times, looks at the new census data that shows that the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island have the country's longest commute, among other revealing data.

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The Takeaway

Census Releases Eleven Billion Bits of Information

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

The U.S. Census Bureau released over 11 billion pieces of information today, giving a window into the socio-economic tapestry of America. What will we learn about how the country has been changing in the last decade? Some of the major takeaways: The Latino population of the U.S. is growing fast (but not so much in border states), the country's middle is emptying out, and the area around Washington, D.C. is home to some of the most affluent. Florida State University demographer Brian Stults joins the show to tell us more about the information being released.

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WNYC News

Housing Advocates Say City Council is Stalling on Abandoned Buildings Bill

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Homeless advocates are pressuring the City Council to hold a hearing on a bill that would require a census of vacant buildings. Supporters of the measure say its a way to pressure the city into converting empty buildings into affordable housing. 

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