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Census

WNYC News

NYC Grows by 70,000

Thursday, April 05, 2012

The Big Apple has gotten even bigger. The number of New Yorkers grew by 70,000 in the 15 month period from April 2010 – July 1, 2011, bumping the city’s population to more than 8.2 million people, according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau estimates released Wednesday.

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The Takeaway

First U.S. Census Digitized

Monday, April 02, 2012

The National Archives published the full records of the 1940 census online today. It's the first United States census to be fully digitalized, and contains details, including names, addresses and income levels, of more than 132 million people. Connie Potter, archivist and senior genealogy specialist at the National Archives, says this trove of information brings out the people behind census statistics.

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WNYC News

New NYPL Feature Allows Access to 1940 NYC Telephone Books

Monday, April 02, 2012

WNYC

The New York Public Library is introducing a new research tool to help track down past city residents through old telephone directories. The release of this new feature coincides with the first-ever online release of the 1940 U.S. Census Bureau data by thee National Archives.

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The Takeaway

Southern Cities Become Less Segregated

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Census data from last year showed more African-Americans from Northern metropolitan areas like New York and Chicago are moving to Southern cities like Atlanta and Kansas City. It’s what’s known as reverse migration. And new analysis done on that census data led by Brown University, shows that a consequence of reverse migration is desegregation, as suburban neighborhoods in some Southern cities become more racially integrated.

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The Takeaway

Data Show Latinos Hit Hardest by Recession

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

The latest Census data reports that nearly 46.2 million Americans, about 1 in 15, are living in poverty. According to a new Pew poll, the face of American poverty has shifted dramatically. For the first time in U.S. history, the percent of Hispanics living in poverty outpaces African Americans with 28.2 percent of Latinos under the poverty line compared to 25.4 percent of blacks. In fact, Latinos overall were hit the hardest by the Great Recession which technically ended in 2009.

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The Takeaway

Census Bureau Changes Flawed Poverty Metric

Monday, November 07, 2011

When the Census Bureau announced that a record number of Americans live below the poverty line it did so using an old metric that has not been changed, apart from adjustments for inflation, since it was hastily conceived in 1963. Starting Monday, the Census Bureau will use a new metric — taking into account such federal assistance like food stamps and such costs as rent, medical and child care, for the first time.

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WNYC News

New York Ranks High in Income Inequality

Thursday, October 27, 2011

As the debate over income inequality rages across the country, the U.S. Census Bureau has released a report that shows that New York is the state with the largest disparity between rich and poor.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Un-Marrying Kind

Friday, September 30, 2011

Senior writer at the Pew Research Center, D'Vera Cohn, talks about the census numbers that show New York City as having a high percentage of unmarried women, and what it says about changing gender and marriage roles.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Latest from the Census

Friday, September 23, 2011

WNYC reporters, Arun Venugopal and Cindy Rodriguez, talk about what the latest census numbers say about poverty levels and other demographic measurements in New York City and the U.S.

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WNYC News

Bloomberg: Job Creation Key to Fighting Rising Poverty

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said job creation is key to help tamp down the city's swelling poverty numbers, and that the city has some of the strongest social safety net programs in the country.

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Transportation Nation

New Census Data: For Commutes, Car Use Up, Transit Down, NYC Shows Opposite Trend

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Transit use is down. Carpooling is down. And driving to work alone is up. That’s according to data just out this morning from the American Community Survey.

The U.S. Census Bureau released detailed survey data showing how commuting habits have changed in recent years. As we begin to parse the numbers, here's an initial look at how Americans are getting to work, and how New Yorkers are different from the rest of the country when it comes to rush hour habits.

Between 2006 and 2010, the data show, the percentage of Americans driving to work alone rose from 76.0 percent to 76.6 percent. During the same period, the number of Americans taking public transportation rose just a tenth of a percentage point – but declined last year to 4.9 percent, down from 5.0 percent in 2009.

The U.S. Census says those number are statistically significant.

Carpooling nationally dropped more dramatically from 2006, down from 10.7 percent to 9.7 percent. Meanwhile, walking to work has hovered around 2.8 or 2.9 percent. And people getting to work by other means, including bike or motorcycle, has remained steady at 1.7 percent.

The American Community Survey measures the primary way of getting to work not combinations of different modes.

The data also show what an outlier New York City is -- more than eleven times as many New Yorkers take public transportation to work as do their counterparts nationwide. Click around on the map above for a sampling of the numbers by neighborhood.

New Yorkers by and large take transit or walk to work, with the notable exceptions of Eastern Queens and the entire borough of Staten Island.

A big chunk of Lower Manhattan residents -- more than a third in some census districts -- walk to work. No other neighborhood in the five boroughs fields close to that number of walkers.

Bucking the national trend, transit use in New York City has been steadily rising since 2006 -- from 54.2 percent of New Yorkers in the five boroughs in 2006 to 55.7 percent in 2010. In some neighborhoods, more than 70 percent of people commute by transit. New York City had previously estimated that 76.7 percent of people commute without the use of a private car.

These new ACS figures show the figure is even higher. Just 22.7 percent of New Yorkers drive to work, down from 23.6 percent in 2006.

Despite the changes in how New Yorkers get to work, commute times have held more or less steady over this period. The median commute nationally is about 25 minutes -- and 40 minutes in the New York area. All the more time to read the paper on the subway.

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WNYC News

New York Leads in Never-Married Women

Thursday, September 22, 2011

New York state has the highest percentage of women who have never been married. That's according to the U.S. Census Bureau, which released the results of its annual American Community Survey Thursday.

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WNYC News

City Residents More Likely to Walk to Work, Use Transit: Survey

Thursday, September 22, 2011

New Yorkers fret about finding parking spots and traffic congestion, but it turns New Yorkers are most likely griping about this while they’re getting to work on a train or bus. You can also view a regional map of commuting preferences.

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WNYC News

More City Families Are Falling Into Poverty

Thursday, September 22, 2011

New York City families are making less money, struggling to pay rent and falling into poverty — and, with poverty increasing in all boroughs except Manhattan, nearly a fifth of families on the city are on food stamps. 

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The Takeaway

Photographing America's Poverty Problem

Thursday, September 15, 2011

New Census numbers show that the U.S. has reached its worst level of poverty since 1983. About 15 percent of Americans live beneath the poverty line. That means that almost 46 million Americans do not earn $11,100 dollars a year as a single person; or, that they live in a family of four that makes under $22,314. The numbers beg the question: are the poor being forgotten in this country?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Raising Manhattanites

Friday, August 12, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for The New York Times, looks at the new census numbers showing more children under five living in Manhattan, but fewer children city-wide.

»» Check out WNYC's census maps below

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WNYC News

Census Data Shows Large Population Swing in New York

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

WNYC

The Empire Center for New York State Policy has reported that 1.6 million New Yorkers moved to other states last decade. That's more than the populations of Buffalo, Rochester, Yonkers, White Plains and West Babylon combined.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Leaving New York

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

E.J. McMahon, senior fellow for Tax and Budgetary Studies at the Manhattan Institute and director of the Empire Center for New York State Policy, and Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for the New York Times, explain the migration of New Yorkers over time, and how the latest report from the Empire Center fits with census data.

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WNYC News

Census Shows Rising Numbers of Gay Couples and Dominicans in New York

Thursday, July 14, 2011

New York City recorded a 27 percent increase in the number of same-sex couples over the last ten years, according to the latest data from the 2010 Census.

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The Takeaway

Childrearing Advice From Single Dads

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

We're thinking of Dad ahead of Father's Day at a time when the number single father families nationwide has nearly doubled since 1990. Angelo Marinosci is a listener in Warren, Rhode Island, who hears us on WGBH. He's 64 with a 5-year-old son. And Bob Murgo, Takeaway listener in Newport, Rhode Island is a 59-year-old and a former single dad. His daughters are now 37 and 38. They talk about what makes a good single father.

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