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Censorship

On The Media

Censorship in the Largest Democracy in the World

Friday, January 11, 2013

The rape and murder of a young woman in India has brought protesters to the streets. Both the national and international press have closely followed the public outrage and tepid response from government officials, turning out in full force to see the accused men in court on Monday. The swarm of journalists prompted a local judge to not only ban reporters from the courtroom, but also prohibit anyone from covering the trial. Brooke talks with New York Times reporter Niharika Mandhana about the repercussions of the ban, and about why the government would keep the trial off the public record. 

Tinariwen - Walla Illa

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Demonstrations over censorship in China and Obama's pick for US defense secretary

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Demonstrations over censorship in China and Obama's pick for US defense secretary

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On The Media

A Look Inside China Central Television

Friday, November 09, 2012

As China's only national TV network, CCTV isn't just the domestic mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party; it's also a global for-profit corporation with over 1.2 billion viewers worldwide. Ying Zhu, a professor at the City University of New York, sits down with Brooke to talk about her groundbreaking new book, Two Billion Eyes: The Story of China Central Television.

B. Fleischmann - Lemmings

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency: Wertham Versus Gaines On Decency Standards

Monday, August 27, 2012

WNYC

The investigation continues! The evils of horror comics are explicated by two contrasting witnesses, Dr.  Fredric Wertham, a reserved psychiatrist, and William Gaines, the chief purveyor of such lurid publications as The Haunt of Fear, The Vault of Horror, and Tales From the Crypt

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Studio 360

Disputed Art Disappears from University Campus

Friday, August 03, 2012

A year ago, the University of Wyoming’s Art Museum commissioned an outdoor sculpture from British artist Chris Drury. Carbon Sink was a 36-foot-diameter vortex of logs killed by pine beetles atop a bed of Wyoming coal. The artist said he wanted to draw a connection ...

Video: Chris Drury explains Carbon Sink

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Top 5 @ 105

Top Five Infamous Bans on Classical Music

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

Whether because of music’s intrinsic power or a distaste for its composers, the art form seems to be scrutinized more than others, as these five examples illustrate.

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On The Media

Chinese Censorship Gets Complicated

Friday, June 01, 2012

Chinese censorship is nothing new. But recently the relationship between censor and dissident has grown more complicated as the government comes to accept that social media is no longer something it can simply take away from Chinese citizens. Brooke speaks with Slate's Jacob Weisberg, who recently traveled to China and spoke with some tech-savvy new dissidents.

 

Lit - My Own Worst Enemy

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Operavore

When Verdi was Savaged by the Censors

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Verdi's operas — with their themes of anti-authoritarianism and democracy spelled danger for the various governments that controlled the occupied Italy in the mid 19th century.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The 50th Anniversary of "The Connection"

Friday, May 04, 2012

In 1962, after just two matinees of "The Connection," the screenings were stopped, the theater closed, and the projectionist arrested, because the New York State Board of Regents had declared the film, about heroin addicts waiting for their dealer, to be obscene. Wendy Clarke, daughter of Shirley Clarke, the film's director, talks about the controversial film. She’s joined by Garry Goodrow, who played Ernie in it, and by Dennis Doros of Milestone Film & Video, which restored the film, "The Connection" opens May 4 at IFC Center.

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On The Media

Iran's "Halal Internet"

Friday, March 02, 2012

The Iranian government is set to launch a "Halal Internet" this spring as an alternative to the greater World Wide Web. Bob speaks to Fast Company reporter Neal Ungerleider about the most ambitious attempt by a government to censor the internet since China's "Great Firewall."

 

Quantic and His Combo Barbaro - Cancao Do Deserto

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On The Media

Internet Censorship From Around the Globe

Friday, January 27, 2012

Last week, public outrage forced congress to table some bills backed by Hollywood lobbyists that would have barred access to sites accused of piracy. But Hollywood’s influence extends well beyond the US Congress. Bob talks to Rainey Reitman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has created a website called Global Chokepoints that tracks pending or existing legislation worldwide (often pushed by the US and Hollywood) that would kick people or websites off the internet.

Dan Bull & Friends - SOPA Cabana

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On The Media

Two Science Journals Asked to Redact an Article

Friday, December 23, 2011

This week the government advisory board overseen by the National Institutes of Health asked two science journals to redact details of a new study about the bird flu virus. The government’s worried that, in the wrong hands, the research could be used to cause a pandemic. Bruce Alberts, the editor of Science talks to Bob about why he’s complying – for now – with the government’s request.

tUnE-yArDs - Doorstep

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On The Media

The Dreyfus Affair and Censorship

Friday, December 09, 2011

When early film legend George Méliès made 1899's L'Affair Dreyfus, a movie about the controversial Dreyfus Affair in France, it inspired riots. The topic was so dangerous for so long in France that the film was banned for decades and wasn't aired again in the country until the 1970s. Brooke speaks with writer Susan Daitch, who wrote Paper Conspiracies, a novel about the impact of the Dreyfus Affair and the Méliès film. 

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The Takeaway

Bay Area Rapid Transit Vs. Protesters, Round 2

Monday, August 15, 2011

After a homeless man was shot dead by Bay Area Rapid Transit system police last month, outraged citizens planned protests for last Thursday at a BART station, planning to organize via their mobile devices. To prevent the demonstrations, BART cut off cell phone service to its passengers. Many called this action censorship, and retaliated. The hacker group Anonymous broke into the BART website, defaced it and released user information to the public. Another protest is set to take place at a BART station today. How will BART handle it this time?

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The Takeaway

Former Chinese Leader Jiang Zemin Rumored to Be Dead

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Chinese state media is denying reports this morning that Jiang Zemin is dead. The 84-year-old became China's leader in 1989, and shepherded the country through its unprecedented economic boom before handing power to President Hu Jintao between 2002 and 2004. The BBC is reporting that internet searches for Jiang's name have been blocked. Martin Patience, correspondent for the BBC, reports on the latest from Beijing.

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Talk to Me

Talk to Me: The PEN World Voices Festival Takes on Corporate Publishing

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Listen to the audio of a PEN World Voices Festival panel at the Standard Hotel. Writers and editors talked about the ways in which corporate publishing limited access to audiences, the pressure to mainstream, and editing as a form of censorship.

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The Takeaway

Creativity, Culture, and Misconceptions in Modern China

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

We hear a lot of negative messages about culture and creativity in modern China. We hear about censorship and a lack of free speech, about internet restrictions (no Facebook) and too many bribes. But when it comes to music, TV, communication, and creativity in general – are our perceptions of China totally off base? And for that matter, what are modern Chinese people’s perceptions of America and our culture?

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The Takeaway

Meet Google's 'Secretary of State'

Friday, April 23, 2010

Yesterday, we talked about Google's emerging foreign policy, as it deals with take-down requests from governments around the world. Today, we speak to the executive who is in effect the company's "Secretary of State."

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Studio 360

Mr. Clean

Saturday, July 30, 2005

Hollywood movies with any profanity must be cleaned up before they run on TV and on airplanes. We talked to an actor named Mark Sussman who specializes in dubbing over the smutty lines of Brad Pitt. Produced by Ben Adair and Ayala Ben-Yehuda of KPCC's Pacific Drift in ...

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Studio 360

Getting Past the Censors

Saturday, April 09, 2005

Being criticized is never easy for a writer, but condemnation for Iranian filmmakers, novelists and poets can lead to censorship, prison or worse. Even a famous writer like Goli Taraghi can find herself condemned for allegedly slipping sexual messages into a simple children's story. We caught up with Taraghi ...

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