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WNYC News

A Pep Talk for Healthcare Workers on Ebola

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A training event at the Javits Center was part rally, part information session for those who would be on the front lines of an outbreak.

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WNYC News

Why New Yorkers Are So Afraid of Ebola

Friday, October 17, 2014

In New York City, health officials are scrambling to reassure a jittery public that the city is prepared to deal with a potential case of Ebola. But out on the streets, the fear is real.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Trying to Control Ebola, By Any Means Necessary

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Health officials have taken up a "cordoning" tactic not used in almost a century to try and isolate the Ebola outbreak. We discuss the latest news and the history of fighting plagues such as this with New York Times science reporter Donald G. McNeil, Jr.

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The Takeaway

Report Shows Disturbing Findings at CDC

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

An new investigation led by the U.S. Department of Agriculture into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention raises new questions about the culture of safety in government laboratories.The USDA found anthrax stored in unlocked refrigerators, and missing containers of anthrax that had to be tracked down by the inspectors.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Your ADHD Stories

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

New CDC data analyzed by the Times show a 53% increase in ADHD diagnosis over the last decade. Now 11% of US children have been diagnosed. Alan Schwarz, health reporter for the New York Times discusses and takes calls.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Feeding Babies Too Early

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Researchers at the CDC were surprised to find that 40% of mothers reported feeding solid food to babies under 4 months old; the recommended age is 6 months old. Sally Findleyprofessor of Clinical Population and Family Health and of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences at Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, discusses the reasons health guidelines for children are sometimes unknown or ignored.

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The Takeaway

CDC Responds to Rampant Flu Outbreak

Friday, January 11, 2013

Flu season is back, and this year's strain of the virus is especially brutal. But why is the 2013 influenza strain so bad? Dr. Joseph Bresee, chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch in the CDC's Influenza Division, explains.

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WNYC News

Meningitis Outbreak Linked to Steroids Shot

Friday, October 05, 2012

Health officials have identified about 75 medical clinics across the country to help track down patients who got a steroids shot linked to a deadly meningitis outbreak.

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The Takeaway

Why Isn't Anything Being Done About the Tuberculosis Outbreak in Florida?

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

In 2008 tuberculosis broke out in Florida. What's strangest isn't what happened before the outbreak. It's what happened after. Which is to say, nothing.

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The Takeaway

Rate of Autism Diagnoses Rises Dramatically

Friday, March 30, 2012

New numbers released by Centers for Disease Control reveal that the number of children who have been diagnosed with autism has nearly doubled since 2002. Susan Hyman, chairperson of the Autism Subcommittee of the American Academy of Pediatrics; Dr. Perri Klass, pediatrician and professor of Journalism and Pediatrics at New York University; and Benedict Carey, science writer for our partner The New York Times, take a closer look at what's behind the numbers.

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On The Media

CDC's Graphic Anti-Smoking Campaign

Friday, March 16, 2012

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are unleashing a new ad campaign that graphically depicts the consequences of smoking. The campaign, called "Tips From Former Smokers," is the first of its kind by the federal government.  Bob speaks to CDC director Dr. Thomas R. Frieden about the new commercials.

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WNYC News

Zombie Campaign Creeps Forward at CDC

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Zombies are creeping back into public health and safety literature.

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WNYC News

City Organ Recipient Contracted HIV Through Transplant

Thursday, March 17, 2011

An organ recipient at a New York City hospital contracted HIV from a live kidney donor, according to the New York State Department of Health.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: LA's Westside Subway Gets Federal OK, JSK is Compared to Robin Hood, and New Version of OnStar Is Essentially Omnipotent

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

(photo by Dre Batista/Flickr)

Federal officials okay preliminary engineering on LA's Westside subway and light rail line. (Los Angeles Times)

Profiling the grid: Nashville utility planners use research and census data to try to determine who will be buying electric vehicles.  Where should they build substations? In the neighborhoods of female Democrats who live close to work.  (AP via New York Times)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 85% of U.S. adults now wear seat belts. "Only 11 percent wore them in 1982, before the first state law requiring seat belt use."  (NPR)

The Guardian calls NYC Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan "a modern day Robin Hood." And regarding congestion pricing, she says "I do think it's a matter of when, not if."

Two New York City Council members have introduced bills that shrink the no-parking zone on either side of a fire hydrant. (New York Times)

Planned construction on New York's F and G subway lines has been postponed due to the last snowfall. (WNYC)

Brooklyn bicyclists who don't obey the law: the NYPD is coming for you. (Gothamist)

The web war of American Airlines vs. travel sites continues to heat up: now, a company that provides ticket information to travel agents has ended its contract with the airline. (CNN)

A former CEO of Amtrak is the latest addition to the board of DC's Metro. (WAMU)

This could be Ray LaHood's worst nightmare: at the Consumer Electronics Show, General Motors and Verizon unveiled a new version of OnStar. Among its features: Exterior cameras that can detect and record hit-and-runs, and then send the video to the car's owner via a secure server. The ability to watch what's going on in and around the car using a smartphone or home computer. Access to social websites such as YouTube, Twitter and Wikipedia using voice commands. Video chatting via Skype through a dashboard-mounted video display. Remote-controlled home appliance and energy use using an application accessible through the car's video console. Live video images from traffic cameras, to view in real-time congestion. (Detroit News)

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Transportation Nation

Will You Drink and Drive This Weekend?

Friday, July 16, 2010

In an average year, Americans report that they drive under the influence of alcohol as many 159 million times.  Maybe more.  By the CDC's count, one person dies every 45 minutes in a crash that involves an alcohol-impaired driver, and these wrecks cost the country more than $51 billion [the way the government adds this up is interesting: among other things, men are more likely to get in alcohol-related crashes, and lost earnings are more severe].

But curbing this practice is tough.  The strongest factor, according to UCLA transportation scholar Eric A. Morris is better enforcement of the law.  Morris is wrapping up a series on the Freakonomics blog about drinking and driving.  Among his writings is the stunning fact that, by the time the average person is caught driving drunk, they've gotten away with it 87 times.  Morris will be on The Takeaway next Tuesday with more.  -- Collin Campbell

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The Takeaway

The True Cost of H1N1

Friday, October 02, 2009

Flu season starts officially on Sunday, and while the government has been urging schools to close only as a last resort in the battle against H1N1, there have already been at least 187 school closures since the school year started last month. Ross Hammond from the Brookings Institution discusses his new report that reveals that the true cost to the nation of closing schools and day care centers could be as much as $47 billion. Kathleen Murphy is a registered nurse and the health services coordinator for the Milwaukee Public Schools; she tells us what her school district is doing to prevent closings. We also speak to Dr. Faheem Younus, the medical director of epidemiology and infection prevention at the Upper Chesapeake Health Center in Bel Air, Md., who has some practical advice for parents who can't take the day off of work.

"Approximately 75-80% [of students] eat two meals a day at school, so right there, when schools close, there's an impact on their nutritional status and a family's ability to meet that child's needs."
—Kathleen Murphy, registered nurse and health services coordinator for the Milwaukee Public Schools, on a side effect of closing schools in case of an H1N1 outbreak

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The Takeaway

H1N1 Roundtable: What Should Pregnant Women Do?

Thursday, July 30, 2009

A Centers for Disease Control advisory panel has recommended that pregnant women get top priority for an H1N1 vaccine when it is expected to become available this fall. How is this recommendation reverberating on the frontlines? The Takeaway turns to Dr. Richard Wenzel, an epidemiologist and Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University, who has just returned from studying the spread of the flu in South America. Also joining the conversation are Leila Laniado, an Atlanta resident who is 5 months pregnant and weighing her options, and Dr. Laura Riley, an OB/GYN at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston explains what she is telling her patients about the vaccine.

"It's clear that the CDC suggests that pregnant women be at the top of the list. I think what pregnant women need to do is go into their obstetricians or primary care physicians and say, 'I'm pregnant, I want the vaccine, I understand that there are some safety issues potentially, but I also understand that getting the flu in this situation could be far worse.'"
—Dr. Laura Riley on flu treatment for pregnant women

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The Takeaway

H1N1: Can a Vaccine Prevent an Epidemic Next Fall?

Friday, July 10, 2009

The swine flu has been out of the headlines lately, but the H1N1 virus has already infected over one million people in the United States. Federal health officials are very concerned about a pandemic when flu season ramps up in the fall. The heads of several federal agencies including Kathleen Sebelius, the head of Health and Human Services, Arne Duncan, the Secretary of Education, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, are all working to try and prevent an epidemic. Dr. Fauci joins The Takeaway with his thoughts on beating the virus.

"It is not an overwhelmingly virulent virus at this time. The concern that we have is that influenza viruses can change, can mutate; you have to watch it very carefully that it doesn't become more fierce or more virulent as it evolves in humans. The good news is that we've been tracking this intensively since the beginning of April. And now, in mid-July, it hasn't changed at all. It's virtually identical."
—Dr. Anthony Fauci on the nature of the H1N1 virus

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The Takeaway

New H1N1 Warnings For Pregnant Women

Thursday, May 14, 2009

H1N1, commonly known as “swine flu," has now been found in 45 states in the U.S., with over 3,300 confirmed cases across the nation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced this week that pregnant women should be treated with Tamiflu, even though the drug isn't normally recommended during pregnancy, because of the risks that the virus poses. One of the three H1N1-related deaths in the U.S. was a pregnant woman in Texas. Tim Uyecki joins us to talk about sensible protections. He’s a medical epidemiologist at the CDC who’s been shaping the center's guidelines for vulnerable populations like pregnant women and young kids.
"All the interest has died down, but this virus has not gone away. It's a new virus. It appears most people are highly susceptible."
—Tim Uyeki of the CDC on swine flu
For more of The Takeaway's coverage of H1N1, click here.

Other Flu Resources
Map: State-by-state swine flu infections (The Takeaway)
Read and listen to more about swine flu (The Takeaway)
Times Topics: Swine Flu (The New York Times)
Q&A: Swine Influenza and You (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Understanding Swine Flu (The New York Times)
Key Facts (CDC)
Swine Flu (CDC)
Swine Flu Alert Map (HealthMap.org)
Consults Blog (The New York Times)
Follow CDCemergency on Twitter

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The Takeaway

Update on swine flu death in Texas

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The spokeswoman for Houston's Department of Health and Human Services, Kathy Barton, told the Houston Chronicle a few details about the child who succumbed to the flu, marking the first death in the United States from the H1N1 virus. It was revealed that the child was from Mexico, had become ill in Brownsville, Texas, and was transported to Houston for treatment. The child died Monday in an unidentified Houston hospital. There have been no reported Houston-area cases of the disease, so far. It's the first death outside of Mexico, where the outbreak first began. And out of the 65 confirmed cases of swine flu in the U.S., most of them are mild. The CDC still has to release more details, but for we go to Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch. She's a former CDC staffer, an epidemiologist at University of Texas School of Public Health, and co-author of the book, Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC.

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