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Cars

Transportation Nation

Who Likes Electric Cars? Rich, Educated, Middle-Aged Men, That's Who

Saturday, May 11, 2013

WNYC

A study from Norway sheds a little light on what kind of person is buying electric cars, and how they drive. 

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Transportation Nation

D.C. Cycle Track Construction To Begin In August

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

WAMU

Construction of a westbound bike lane connecting Georgetown with downtown D.C. could begin in August, District transportation planners said Monday during a walking tour of the proposed M Street track.

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Life of the Law

Dibs

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

After a big snowstorm, the streets of many northern cities start to get cluttered with furniture. Why? Because of “dibs,” the practice of claiming a shoveled-out parking spot. Some see it as a necessity, others as a dangerous nuisance,

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life of Grand Prix Driver Phil Hill

Friday, January 11, 2013

Michael Cannell tells the story of Phil Hill-a lowly California mechanic who became the first American-born driver to win the Grand Prix. The Limit  charts Hill’s journey from acing midget cars in dusty California lots to Grand Prix tracks across Europe.

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WNYC News

Runway Packed With Totaled Cars Raises Concerns on LI

Friday, January 04, 2013

Shortly after Sandy hit, Insurance Auto Auctions leased the two runways at Calverton Airpark, on Eastern Long Island. Tens of thousands of cars are now collecting at the airport, while they await auction.

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WNYC News

City Tows Cars Without Notice from Storm-Damaged Areas

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Some New Yorkers say their cars are being towed from Sandy-affected areas without warning, and the city confirms, it’s true.

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WNYC News

How to Avoid Buying a Flood-Damaged Car

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Every time there's a storm that damages large numbers of cars, that’s an opportunity for unscrupulous dealers to try to re-sell damaged vehicles.

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The Takeaway

Cars that Talk to Each Other

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

The next big thing for cars out of Detroit is a huge transportation safety and infrastructure project that has buy-in from eight auto-makers and the U.S. Department of Transportation. The project is called Safety Pilot Model Deployment. Cars communicate with each other, the roads, and the traffic signals to improve safety and prevent accidents.

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Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: Don't Look Down Edition

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Slate critics Julia Turner, Dana Stevens and June Thomas discuss the 2012 Sight and Sound list of the top 50 films of all time, the dance drama Bunheads, and Jerry Seinfeld's new web series, "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Paul Ingrassia Tells a History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Paul Ingrassia tells the story America’s vehicular history—from the assembly lines of Henry Ford to the open roads of Route 66, from the lore of Jack Kerouac to the sex appeal of the Hot Rod. In Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars, Ingrassia explores how cars have both propelled and reflected the American experience.

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Transportation Nation

NPR's Car Talk Guys Retire - Reruns Continue

Friday, June 08, 2012

Ray, left, and Tom Magliozzi, of Car Talk (photo: Cartalk.com)

People are driving fewer miles, taking mass transit more frequently, and young people care way less about cars and driving.

Now comes word quarter-century-long running public radio program, Car Talk, will no longer produce fresh episodes.

NPR said today that:

"Tom and Ray Magliozzi, aka Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers, the comedian mechanics who host NPR's Car Talk, will tell their listeners this afternoon that as of this fall, they'll no longer record new programs. But their weekly call-in series will continue to be distributed by NPR drawing on material from their 25 years of show archives." The show ran for ten years as a local program in Boston before going nationwide.

NPR says the two, who are 74 and 63, and who've broadcast for 35 years, decided "it was time to stop and smell the cappuccino."  (We are not making this up.)

Stations, including flagship WNYC in New York, say they'll continue to air the re-packaged episodes culled from choice moments out of the 12,500 logged and rated calls in the 25 years of archives.

The guffawing brothers aren't worried the show will sound stale in repeats. And why should they? Public radio listeners will still be hunting for affable fixit advice for a 1995 Suburu... ten years from now.

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The Takeaway

The Immortal Driver: Chicago's Plan to Eliminate Traffic Deaths

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Is zero traffic fatalities a utopian pipe dream? Chicago’s transportation commissioner Gabe Klein explains why he thinks otherwise. He lays out the city's new initiative to eliminate all traffic fatalities within ten years.

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The Takeaway

The Virtues of Public Transportation, From a Proud Straphanger

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The United States has long been a car culture. But with fewer young people buying cars than ever, an American automobile industry in decline, and rising fuel prices, this culture is facing something of a crisis. Taras Grescoe, author of "Straphanger," takes this as a unique opportunity to look at public transportation throughout the world, and to consider how trains, subways, and buses can be better integrated into our daily lives.

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The Takeaway

Excerpt: 'Straphanger: Saving Our Cities and Ourselves from the Automobile'

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Were it not for the subway, New York as it is today would not exist. At a crucial time in the city's history, the engineers of this ingenious subterranean railroad cleared the streets of impossible congestion and decanted the population of the teeming, insalubrious tenements of the Lower EastSide to the farthest corners of the boroughs. Because it was able to move so many people so quickly, the subway became the ultimate urban density amplifier, allowing the apartment buildings and office towers of Manhattan to be built side-by-side, and turning a 26-square-mile island of gneiss, marble, and schist into one of the world's greatest metropolises, where millions could live and trade services, goods, and ideas swiftly and efficiently.

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The Takeaway

What Kinds of Cars Are Popular in China?

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Paul Eisenstein, author of The Detroit Bureau, is at arguably the biggest of all motor show's — and perhaps the most important: Beijing. What kinds of cars do the Chinese people like? The answer has important implications for the American auto industry. That's because what the Chinese want from their cars is increasingly dictating what American's get in their cars.

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The Takeaway

Why are Young Americans Driving Less?

Friday, April 20, 2012

The open road: it’s part of the American dream. Or, at least, it used to be. A new study finds that 16- to 34-year-olds without driver’s licenses rose to 26 percent in 2010 from 21 percent a decade earlier. At the same time, biking, walking, and other driving alternatives rose among young people in the past decade. Tony Dutzik is a senior policy analyst at the Frontier Group and co-author of the study. Takeaway listener Emily is a 25-year-old who rarely drives, and didn't get her license until she was 19.

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WNYC News

Report: NY, NJ to See Big Savings from Fuel Efficient Cars by 2025

Thursday, April 19, 2012

WNYC

An increase in fuel efficiency standards to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 will save New York and New Jersey motorists big money, according to a new report by the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental group. New Yorkers will save almost $3 billion a year, while New Jersey residents will save $1.5 billion.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Speeding Away

Sunday, April 08, 2012

A lot of people listen to SELECTED SHORTS in their cars.  In this program, the characters are in their cars—running from a bad love affair in the first piece, and toward a natural disaster in the second.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Gridlock Sam's Master Plan: Private Cars

Thursday, April 05, 2012

Each Thursday in April, Sam Schwartz, aka Gridlock Sam at The Daily News, and former NYC traffic commissionerexplains another facet of his plan for equitably pricing NYC transit and tolls. This week: private cars.  

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The Takeaway

Car Sales Are Up, Are They Sustainable?

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

If you need proof that the economy is looking up, you need only look as far as your neighborhood car lot, or maybe even your own driveway. This week it was announced that there was a major bump in March auto sales. How major? Chrysler alone experienced a 34% increase in sales over the course of the month. Paul Eisenstein is the publisher of TheDetroitBureau.com. He explains what to make of these auto numbers, and whether they’re sustainable.

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