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Capital Bike Share

Transportation Nation

Bankruptcy of Bike Share Company Will Not Immediately Affect Systems in U.S. Cities

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

WAMU

Montreal's bike share company, which also supplies equipment and technology to the largest bike share systems in the U.S., has filed for bankruptcy—but transportation officials in the U.S. say that won't have any immediate impact on operations.

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Transportation Nation

Thousands Sign Up for New York City Bike Share in First Hours of Registration

Monday, April 15, 2013

UPDATED. Registration for New York's bike share system officially opened at 11 am Monday, and by 3 pm, some 2500 people had signed up. By 3:30 pm Tuesday, 5000 people had purchased $103 annual memberships, according to DOT spokesman Scott Gastel.

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Transportation Nation

DC Bike Share Visualizer Shows How Neighborhoods Use CaBi Differently

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Washington, D.C.'s Capital Bikeshare released its latest batch of customer trip data -- and the fine folks at Mobility Lab turned it into an interactive map. What's interesting about this visualizer is that it sorts trips by neighborhood cluster.

Instead of seeing all the trips everywhere -- which is beautiful --  you can see how a given station connects to the areas around it. The more rides between two stations, the thicker the red line. Click on most downtown stations and it looks like a starburst of rides.

Trips on the National Mall tend to stay on the National Mall or head over the Jefferson Memorial.

Bike Share trips on the National Mall, Washington D.C. 4th Quarter, 2012.

Mobility Lab has also set the map so you see the direction of trips, including "unbalancedness" between stations. That's when trips tend to be in one direction more than another. It's not so surprising that more people ride downhill on Connecticut Avenue from the Van Ness station to Dupont Circle. But it is interesting to see how many more people ditch the heavy bike share bikes at the bottom and return by some other, presumably less tiring, means. Of the 203 trips between those two stations in the 4th quarter of 2012, 82 percent of them were downhill.

(Read TN's article on how DC rebalances bike share stations here.)

Trips from Van Ness bike share station in 4th quarter 2012

Michael Schade over at Mobility Lab has pulled out a few more interesting data points. Alexandria, Virginia, joined CaBi last year. Most of those bike share trips appear to be heading to or from the two Metro stations.  So Schade concludes bike share in Alexandria is being used to solve a last-mile transit problem.

See his full analyses and more maps here.

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Transportation Nation

Capital Bikeshare Opens First University Station

Thursday, August 02, 2012

Capital Bikeshare on the streets in Washington D.C.

(Patrick Madden -- Washington, D.C., WAMU) Capital Bikeshare will now be a campus staple -- at least at one school in D.C.

Gallaudet is the first university in the District to host a bikeshare station, and D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray says he believes other schools will soon follow Gallaudet's lead.

"We are trying to get people out of automobiles, and certainly bikes represent a good way to get people around the city without the environmental consequences," says Gray.

Capital Bikeshare continues to grow in DC, with more than 165 stations. The program just recorded its 2 millionth ride.

Gray says the goal is to add 84 new bikeshare stations in DC by the end of the year.

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Transportation Nation

Survey: Capital Bike Share Saved 5 Million Driving Miles

Monday, June 18, 2012

Capital Bike Share on the streets in Washington D.C.

A new survey of Washington's Capital Bikeshare, done for Capital Bikeshare, says four in ten users report using cars less -- for an average savings of 523 miles for those users.

The survey's authors say that translates to a total of 5 million miles not driven.

But the survey also found that bike share users tend to be, "on average, considerably younger, more likely to be male and Caucasian, highly educated, and slightly less affluent" than the adult population of the Washington, DC area.

And even though the survey found most (56%) of trips were for non-work purposes, more than nine in ten bike share users are employed, compared to just seven in ten adults in the Washington region.

Other results:

* 64 percent said they would not have made the trip without bike share;

* 15 percent said they joined bike share because of a "Living Social" offer;

* More than half of respondents used bike share as a feeder to reach transit stops.

Lots of other interesting nuggets. You can read the full survey here.

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Transportation Nation

Why Don't More Blacks Use DC's Bike Share?

Friday, January 13, 2012

Capital Bike Share in Washington D.C.

Virginia Tech has just released a study of casual users of Washington, DC's bike share system, and the numbers on African American usage are startlingly low.

The study, based on 400  surveys of those who buy either 24-hour or 5-day passes, shows that just 5 percent of such users are "black/African American."

Caucasians represent 78 percent of casual users.

That contrasts starkly with the population of the District, which is 50 percent black,  and 34 percent white.

(Hispanic use is also low, but the Hispanic population of DC is only 9 percent.)

Ralph Buehler, the VT Assistant Professor who oversaw the study, cautioned that their sample only looked at casual users.  "Many of those users are tourists," Buehler said. "It's not surprising that would be more heavily white than the population of DC."

But Capital Bikeshare's own numbers for annual membership look even worse.  According to CaBi data from 2010, cited in the report, just two percent of annual members are black.

Chris Holben, DC's Bikesharing Project Manager, tells us more recent data shows an increase.  African American participation doubled by the end of 2011 -- but it's still only at four percent.

Ralph Buehler ran the numbers for us, and as it happens, participation in bike share is lower than general cycling rates for African Americans. According to the American Community survey, 12 percent of the population is African American, and 11 percent of the people who bike to work are African American.

Holben says DDOT is working to address the problem. One barrier to entry, he says, is the need to have a credit card to join the system. DDOT is participating in a "Bank on DC" program to get bank cards to the "unbanked," a population that typically tends to be more black than the general population. DC is running a promotion to offer discount Capital Bikeshare  memberships ($50 instead of $75) with the bank cards, and is looking into ways to create a monthly payment plan to make it even easier to join.

Holben also suggests that geography may play a role. The heavily African American neighborhood of Anacostia is separated from the rest of DC by a long bridge, it's more hilly than other parts of DC, and highways  further serve to cut off bike access.

Buehler adds: "There is a relative lack of bicycle infrastructure in the neighborhoods East of the Anacostia River (in Wards 8 and 7; the neighborhood of Anacostia is actually only a small part of that area).  Moreover population density is lower there than in downtown"

DDOT says it plans more outreach in African American neighborhoods as the weather warms up.

But the question remains: why do so few African Americans use DC's bike share?

 

 

 

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: More Roads Lead to More Traffic, Black Women Bike DC, and London's Bike Share, A Year Later

Monday, July 11, 2011

A recent study says that building more roads leads to ... more traffic. And more transit doesn't relieve traffic congestion.  (NPR)

New York's subways attract almost as many riders on weekends as they do during the work week -- but fewer trains and planned maintenance lead to insanely crowded cars. (New York Times)

The Republican's plan to privatize Amtrak and the Northeast Corridor could leave NJ Transit vulnerable to fare hikes. (Daily Record)

WAMU looks at how the House's transportation budget would affect the DC region.

The UAW wants to organize a foreign automaker, labor leader says union's future hinges upon it: "I don't think there's a long-term future for the UAW, I really don't." (Detroit Free Press)

A look at London's bike share system, which is almost a year old. "The bikes make 20,000 journeys a day, but in a relentlessly predictable pattern, with huge spikes during the morning rush hour at the major rail stations and then again, in reverse, as commuters dash back to catch their evening trains." (The Guardian)

Black women take their place in DC's bike lanes -- and encourage others to join them. (Washington Post)

Residents, police and business owners want Bolt Bus booted from West 33rd Street. (DNA Info)

The mayor of Birmingham wants to create a tourist transit system to transport visitors to downtown hotels and attractions like the zoo, Vulcan Park and the botanical gardens. (Birmingham News)

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