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Campaign Finance Reform

BackStory

A Century Of Reform

Friday, August 08, 2014

With the American History Guys

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On The Media

The Super PAC to End Super PACs

Friday, July 11, 2014

On Independence Day, Harvard Law Professor Lawrence Lessig’s political fund aimed at ending the influence of money in campaigns reached its crowd funding goal of $5 million. Now can it elect a member of Congress committed to campaign finance reform?

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WNYC News

Blaming the System, Flush Cuomo Makes Push for Campaign Finance Reform

Friday, March 08, 2013

WNYC

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s push for campaign finance reform is drawing questions about his own prolific fundraising and his connections to outside interests groups.

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The Empire

Former Public Advocate Mark Green Endorses Lancman Campaign

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

It's a day of dueling endorsements: Just hours after Assemblywoman Grace Meng's campaign received the backing of Congressman Gary Ackerman, her assembly colleague Rory Lancman stood with former New York City public advocate Mark Green to receive his blessing as the candidate for Congress in the 6th district in Queens.

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It's A Free Blog

The Soros / Koch Effect? Blame Campaign Finance Reform

Friday, March 18, 2011

WNYC

"Direct donations to candidate campaigns should be only allowed for individuals, cutting one more leash with which special interest groups control the politicians who represent us in Washington."

-- Solomon Kleinsmith

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Koch Brothers Vs Campaign Finance

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Kenneth Vogel, Politico senior reporter, on what the Koch brothers mean for the campaign finance movement.

→ Read A Recap And Join The Discussion At It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

My Life in Campaign Contributions

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Campaign finance reform. I have never given money to a political campaign as a single contributor. I have always contributed in response to specific issue or as a member of a specific institution. In the first case, I would agree that money constitutes a form of speech. I was paying to support an issue. It was my commentary on how much that meant to me, my contribution. It was an enhancement, if you will, to my stated opinion. In the seventies I worked for the AFLCIO as a union welder. During the 1974 political campaign (Nixon had resigned you’ll remember) I contributed through my union. Everything was voluntary according to my Union buddies and I had no problem contributing but I knew that THEY knew whether and possibly how much I had contributed. I was just an 18 year old and it wasn’t much money but it was an interesting relationship. My political contribution was thrown in with that of every other union member and through our pooled cash kitty the Union projected its national clout. This was not political speech. My money was kind of like the text for a bigger speech being delivered by a Union which had its own agenda which certainly intersected with my political aspirations in some places but was also at odds in other places. For instance, take a look at the seniority rule in hiring and firing. This clearly did not favor me at all. Later that year I was laid off as one of the first in the first wave of layoffs from my company. I never returned and my union membership was hardly a measure of job security for me. If money was speech, it was an insult I was delivering to myself. (READ MORE)

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The Takeaway

Campaign Finance: The Battle Between Small Donors and Big Business

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

It has been illegal for corporations to donate directly to a political campaign since 1907, when Teddy Roosevelt pushed for that era’s big campaign finance overhaul. And even in the last forty years we’ve seen one new version of this reform attempted after another, as politicians have found ways to circumvent the old laws.

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The Takeaway

Wild Wild West and the 2010 Mid-Term Elections

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

We’re nearing the end of the campaign trail for candidates seeking to win over voters in this November’s upcoming mid-term elections.  Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich and Mike Shear, chief political reporter for the Caucus Blog at our partner The New York Times, are joining us every Tuesday to give us updates on what the candidates are up to on the trail.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

30 Issues: Money & Politics - LLC Loophole

Friday, September 24, 2010

Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, lawyer and campaign finance expert with the NYU Law School's Brennan Center for Justice and WNYC reporter Bob Hennelly discuss loopholes within campaign finance regulations, particularly when it comes to setting up LLCs here in New York State. Plus, to show how easy the LLC process is, WNYC producer Jody Avirgan sets up our very own LLC live on-air!

Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

Politics

Proposed Bill Would Limit LLC Contributions to $5,000

Friday, August 20, 2010

An investigation by WNYC has found that Attorney General and gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo has been accepting large amounts of money from limited liability corporations, a practice that is legal but is widely believed to skirt the intent of campaign law.

Assemblywoman Joan Millman of Brooklyn is sponsoring a bill to close the loophole on LLCs donating huge sums of money to political campaigns in New York. She says she hopes Cuomo will rethink his decision to take so much money from these groups.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Congressional Round-Up

Monday, August 02, 2010

John Stanton, senior writer at Roll Call, talks about immigration bills, campaign finance reform, the ethics charges against Congressman Rangel, and what else is next for Congress.

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The Takeaway

Senate Votes on DISCLOSE Act

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

The Senate will vote today on the DISCLOSE Act, a bill already approved by the House, that would require corporations to disclose their spending on federal political campaigns and to reveal their identities in any political ads they fund. The bill is being seen as the Democrats' answer to the Supreme Courts's ruling on the Citizens United case, which allowed big corporations, domestic and foreign, to spend unlimited amounts of money on American elections.

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The Takeaway

Will China Control Our Elections?

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Supreme Court's landmark opinion last week may have lasting effects on how politics are conducted in the future, especially when foreign money comes into the picture. The decision on Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission says that corporations have the same rights as individuals under the First Amendment, and can spend unlimited amounts of money on political commercials.

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The Takeaway

More Corporate Money Coming To Elections Near You

Friday, January 22, 2010

Yesterday, the Supreme Court effectively overturned The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, the campaign finance reform passed in 2002.  Senators John Mcain (R-Ariz.) and Russ Feingold (D-Wisc.) designed the law to limit the influence of big business and labor unions on elections. 

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