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Business And Economy

The Takeaway

Takeouts: BofA Testimony, Redskins' Name, Fed. Court Filibuster

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

  • Business Takeout: The New York Times' Louise Story previews what some Wall Street executives will tell Congress later today about bailout money and the Bank of America/Merill Lynch merger.
  • Washington Takeout: President Obama's first appointment to the federal courts is being met by threats of a GOP fillibuster in the Senate today. Todd Zwillich examines the roots of the opposition.
  • Sports Takeout: Takeaway sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin joins us with news of a football match happening off the field, as the Supreme Court decides not to weigh in on the debate over re-naming the Washington Redskins.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Economic Reports, Manny Pacquiao, Fort Hood Questions

Monday, November 16, 2009

  • Money Takeout: We look ahead to a week of key economic reports with Kelly Evans, economics reporter for The Wall Street Journal.
  • Sports Takeout: Our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin fills us in on Saturday's big boxing bout: Filipino Manny Pacquiao won against Miguel Cotto from Puerto Rico.
  • Washington Takeout: Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich looks at the questions being asked on Capitol Hill about the Fort Hood shootings.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: US Companies in Iraq, NFL, Going Rogue

Friday, November 13, 2009

  • Business Takeout: New York Times reporter Louise Story reveals how tough business can be in Iraq. Even though the U.S. is spending billions there, American companies are having a tough time landing local contracts. 
  • Sports Takeout: Our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin recaps last night's Bears/49ers game and gives his predictions for the upcoming weekend in the NFL.
  • Book  Takeout: New York Times reporter Kate Zernike tells about Sarah Palin's new book, "Going Rogue." The book isn't due for release until next week, but it's already making waves.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: AMA on Don't Ask, Don't Tell; Pay at AIG; NFL

Thursday, November 12, 2009

  • Washington Takeout: The Takeaway's Todd Zwillich says many people were surprised when the American Medical Association took a position that the U.S. military's policy towards gay service members – 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' – is harmful to the health of gay servicemen and women.
  • Business Takeout: New York Times reporter Louise Story joins us to discuss frustration over executive compensation at AIG and other bailed-out companies.
  • Sports Takeout: Our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin talks about tonight's Bears/49ers matchup in the NFL, as well as a controversy below the Mason-Dixon line over a fight song at "Ole Miss."

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The Takeaway

Challenges for President Obama on Asia Trip

Thursday, November 12, 2009

President Obama takes off for an eight-day trip to Asia tonight. He’ll visit Seoul, Singapore and spend three days in China, where the agenda will include some of the biggest global challenges of the day: global warming, the economy and nuclear proliferation. But his first destination is Tokyo, where he’ll meet with new Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama, who has recently called for a more “equal” relationship with the United States. We speak to Kenneth Lieberthal, director of the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution; along with Martin Fackler, Tokyo bureau chief for our partner, The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Reid's Dilemma, Goldman Sachs and 'God's work,' Listeners

Thursday, November 12, 2009

  • Washington Takeout: The Takeaway's Todd Zwillich says Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid may face sharp criticism and intense pressure from groups on both sides of the abortion debate, when the House health care bill and the contested "Stupak amendment" goes to the Senate.
  • Business Takeout: New York Times finance reporter Louise Story takes us through the recent boost in charity at Goldman Sachs – where's the money's going and why the boost now?
  • Listener Takeout: Listeners respond to our question on whether America does enough for its veterans.

 

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Bear Stearns Acquittals, NFL, Sesame Street

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

  • Money Takeout: Newsweek columnist Dan Gross says it's no surprise that two former Bear Stearns hedge fund managers were acquitted on Tuesday. He says the roots of the financial collapse are stupidity, not criminality.
  • Sports Takeout: Our sports commentator, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin, gives his mid-season assessment of the NFL.
  • Listener Takeout: Listeners tell us the difference that "Sesame Street" has made in their lives.

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The Takeaway

Eliot Spitzer on Bear Stearns Acquittals

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

A Brooklyn jury acquitted two former Bear Stearns executives Tuesday. The two men had been charged with lying to investors. To give us the low-down on all of this is a man accustomed to suing Wall Street titans, former New York attorney general (and former governor) Eliot Spitzer.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Dow Jones High, Steelers vs. Broncos, Listeners on Wall St. Pay

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

  • Money Takeout: Newsweek's Daniel Gross tells us about the Dow Jones Industrial Average's 52-week high, and what it means for the economy as a whole.
  • Sports Takeout: Our own Ibrahim Abdul-Matin gives us a re-cap of Monday Night Football, which pitted the Pittsburgh Steelers, defending Superbowl champs, against the Denver Broncos.
  • Listener Takeout: We hear responses to our conversation about windfalls on Wall Street and the toll troop deployments take on military families.

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The Takeaway

Capitalism, 20 Years After the Berlin Wall

Monday, November 09, 2009

Twenty years ago, the Berlin Wall came tumbling down in what seemed to be a victorious day for capitalism. We look back 20 years while countries around the world today continue capitalist experiments and attempt to weather the current economic crisis. Meanwhile, a new BBC World Service poll says that only the U.S. and Pakistan believe capitalism is working today. We speak to Harvard history professor Niall Ferguson, author of "The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World."

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Health Care in House, Corporate Apologies, Colts' Squeaker

Monday, November 09, 2009

  • Washington Takeout: Our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, takes a look at the healthcare bill and what the paper-thin margin of victory in the House portends as the bill heads to the Senate.
  • Business Takeout: We get a story of a quest for corporate redemption from Louise Story, finance reporter for our partners The New York Times. John Reed, former head of Citigroup, is apologizing for his role in making the company so big and is now calling for reforms that would force the financial goliath (along with others like it) to split in two.
  • Sports Takeout: Ibrahim Abdul-Matin recaps Sunday's NFL action, including the Indianapolis Colts' squeaker agains the Houston Texans to hang onto their perfect record so far this season.

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The Takeaway

Americans Using Food Stamps More Than Ever Before

Tuesday, November 03, 2009

Add this to your list of indicators that the recession isn't over yet: There are now more Americans on food stamps than at any time in history. According to a report in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 36 million Americans currently receive food stamps, and 50 percent of American children will have lived in households which receive government food assistance by time they turn 20.

We speak with Mark Rank, professor of social welfare at Washington University in St. Louis and one of the authors of the study. Also with us are Angel Seymore, a home health care aide from the Bronx who receives food stamps; and Joel Berg, executive director of New York City Coalition Against Hunger.

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The Takeaway

Ford's Profitable 3rd Quarter the First in Four Years

Monday, November 02, 2009

Ford announced this morning that it made nearly $1 billion in the third quarter, making it Ford's first quarter in the black in North America since 2005. Ford now says it now expects to be "solidly profitable" by 2011. For more, we talk with The New York Times' automotive reporter, Nick Bunkley.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: The 2% Option?, Bernie Madoff, World Series

Monday, November 02, 2009

  • Washington Takeout: Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich asks: if the new government estimate that only 2% of the public will actually use a public option is accurate, did it warrant such a big fight? If it passes, will it have enough negotiating clout to matter?   
  • Business Takeout: Bernie Madoff gave a jailhouse interview to the SEC, the agency he says should have caught him years ago. Louise Story, finance reporter for our partner The New York Times, explains why Madoff's multi-billion dollar Ponzi scheme passed regulator inspections.
  • Sports Takeout: The Takeaway's Sports Contributor, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin, warms the hearts of Yankees fans as he recaps last night's Game 4 and anticipates tonight's Game 5 matchup in Philadelphia.


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The Takeaway

Takeouts: GDP, NFL, Listeners Retrain

Friday, October 30, 2009

  • Money Takeout: Louise Story talks about the latest GDP numbers and just how confident consumers seem to be feeling.
  • Sports Takeout: Ibrahim Abdul-Matin looks ahead to the NFL games this weekend.
  • Listener Takeout: We hear stories from listeners who have retrained to keep up with the changing economy.

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The Takeaway

Foreign Companies Manufacturing in America

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

It might seem that globalization is a continuing and ominous threat to America's workforce. New York Times business correspondent Micheline Maynard, however, says foreign companies can help American communities — especially as they hire Americans in tough economic times. Maynard is the author of a new book "The Selling of the American Economy.” We're also joined by Amy Lindsay, a former Estée Lauder employee, now a factory worker for Toyota in Indiana. She tells us about her own experience switching from an American employer to a foreign one. Our own Todd Zwillich gives us an insider's view on the recent congressional decision to extend unemployment benefits again.

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The Takeaway

Is the Bad Economy Increasing Child Abuse?

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

According to a recent study, child abuse cases went up 35 percent nationally between 2001 and 2007. In one hospital in Phoenix, child abuse cases are up 40 precent over last year alone. Can the recession be blamed for these gloomy statistics? Or is there something else causing this trend? We get insights from Amy Terreros, a pediatric nurse practitioner who diagnoses child abuse at Phoenix Children's Hospital, and Jim Hmurovich, president and CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America.

"As a nation I think we have to make it a social and cultural norm that when child abuse and neglect occurs we find it unacceptable, that parenting is a tough job, that it is good for a parent to ask for help and not feel embarrassed, ashamed or stigmatized. And asking for help is not a sign of poor parenting."
—Jim Hmurovich, president and CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America, on one solution to prevent child abuse

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The Takeaway

Put Down the Plastic: Life Without Credit Cards

Monday, October 26, 2009

Last week, we looked at how some banks were canceling consumer credit cards without warning and how consumers could avoid it by using their cards more. That discussion sparked a debate about whether people can get by without credit cards at all. We speak to two people who are doing just that: Joel Westendorf of Los Angeles; and Andrea Hermitt of Atlanta. Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner lays out some of the logistical benefits and drawbacks of life without plastic.

"There's a myth that you have to have a credit card to have a credit history, and that's not the case. If you're paying off a car loan regularly, or a student loan regularly, or a mortgage loan regularly, that is also building your credit history."
—Beth Kobliner, on the myth that credit cards are required to establish a credit score

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The Takeaway

Bankruptcies Rise as Medical Debt Mounts

Friday, October 23, 2009

In this weak economy, more and more Americans are filing for bankruptcy. Contrary to what you might expect, the biggest reason people are doing so isn’t excessive spending or job losses. According to a recent study, 62 percent of the people who file for bankruptcy do so because of medical debt. After legislation in 2005 removed the distinction between bankruptcy caused by credit problems and medical expenses, many more people – even those with health insurance – found themselves losing their homes after catastrophic medical events wrecked their finances. We ask bankruptcy expert Henry Sommer and The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, to explain this phenomenon. We also speak with Kerry Burns, a social worker who is struggling to pay back medical debt.

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The Takeaway

Homelessness Rising as Winter Sets In

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Some indicators say the U.S. economy is pulling out of its tailspin, but as winter approaches, the number of people who have lost their homes is on the rise. Libby Hayes, executive director of Homes for Families in Boston, says homelessness is a lagging indicator. The economy might be improving, but jobs haven't come back, yet. We're joined by Vannessa LaBarca and James Foresteire, both homeless and having trouble finding work. Steve Berg, from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, says the Obama administration's relief plan is starting to trickle down to families, but it will be a slow process.

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