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Budgets

WNYC News

NYC Budget Tests Mayor's Bonds with Wall Street

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The city's bonds are getting good ratings, but some investors are still worried.

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WNYC News

Comptroller Says State Probably Can Afford Tax Cuts, But Just Barely

Friday, December 20, 2013

State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli says he’ll need to see more details and end of the calendar year state revenue figures before deciding whether the state can afford $2 billion in new tax cuts that Governor Andrew Cuomo is likely to propose.

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New Jersey News

Why 41 Districts Want to Keep Separate April School Board Elections

Monday, April 15, 2013

WNYC

Only 41 New Jersey districts will hold school board elections Tuesday now that most -- 501 districts -- have chosen to move their elections to November

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WNYC News

Grim Economic Outlook for States, Including NY & NJ

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Even as the economy shows signs of picking up, the outlook for states is grim, according to a task force report by public policy and budget experts.

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Schoolbook

Cuomo Hints at More State Money for Schools Next Year

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, who is expected to propose a state budget next month, reaffirmed his support on Thursday for a 4 percent increase in state education aid, or about $755 million more than the current year.

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Schoolbook

Let's Talk About the Money

Thursday, September 15, 2011

With budgets growing ever tighter, parents are being asked to fill in the gaps with contributions to their child's school. Beth Fertig discussed the subject today on "The Brian Lehrer Show."

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WNYC News

Financial 411: Budget Talks Heat Up in NYC

Monday, May 23, 2011

The New York City council gets serious this week about the mayor's budget. And "New York Works" checks in at the pilot house of the Staten Island Ferry.

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It's A Free Country ®

Krugman on Labor, Debt, and the GOP's 'Magic Asterisk'

Friday, March 04, 2011

Remember how many schools and bridges and other things we have now were in fact built during the 1930s, done by the WPA. We could have been doing useful stuff. We had a lot of workers sitting idle when they could have been producing stuff that would actually make us richer in the long run. The weakness of the economy is the single biggest reason why we have deficits; it's not government spending. Spending has actually grown less since the recession hit than it did in the years prior to the recession.

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, talking about the fate of the economic recovery on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Paul Krugman On Unions and Other Budget Battles

Friday, March 04, 2011

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman talks about the nation's finacial climate, the battle over collective bargaining rights for unions, and the news of the economy.

Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

It's A Free Country ®

From Libya to Washington

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

WNYC
Always what's shocking in polls is when people admit what they haven't heard of. In the course of watching what's going on in Egypt, Lybia, Tunisia, all the other places in recent times, I've been astounded by the poll numbers of people who say they have only barely heard that there is something going on.

David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

Obama Faces State Governors

Monday, February 28, 2011

WNYC

"Make yourself feel at home," President Obama said as he began his speech to the National Governor's Association on Monday, "but for those of you interested in the next election, I don't mean that literally."

After a laugh (from the president and governors alike), Obama launched into his speech, discussing states' flexibility in the controversial health care act; federal spending on infrastructure, research and innovation; the state and federal budget crises; and, of course, the public work force. In the wake of the budget protests in Wisconsin and with an audience of state leaders, the President gave a veiled jab at the state's ongoing battle.

Obama spoke to the delegation of Governors at the White House. Vice President Biden, Dr. Jill Biden and the First Lady also spoke at the gathering on Monday.

 

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It's A Free Country ®

Wisconsin's Momentum Crosses State Lines

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

WNYC

Since Valentines Day, Wisconsin's capital has been inundated by protesters having their say about Gov. Scott Walker's controversial budget proposal. They aren't giving him much love.

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It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Your Take on the Budget Battles

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

Ever since Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's budget bill was revealed in Madison earlier this month, protesters have had their say. Now you have yours.

The bill limits the ability of public sector unions to collectively bargain, increases required health insurance and pension contributions from government workers, and grants authorities the right to terminate any employees who participate in strikes or walkouts during a governor-declared state of emergency.

Here's what you had to say about the protests in Wisconsin and the controversial cuts on the chopping block.

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It's A Free Country ®

What Does the Future Hold for U.S. Labor?

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC
Some people say that if Governor Walker gets his legislation through that would weaken public sector unions, it's inevitbale that the Republicans will also take some steps to weaken private sector unions.

Steven Greenhouse, New York Times labor and workplace correspondent, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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It's A Free Country ®

As Wisconsin Bickering Continues, a Real Compromise Languishes

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

Democrats in the legislature have literally abandoned their posts, and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has signaled he is not interested in any compromise whatsoever.

Doctors (who should lose their licenses for this) are giving hypocritical teachers fake doctor's notes so they can abandon their posts, left wingnuts are calling Walker a Nazi, right wingnuts are responding with their own brand of insanity and a whole hell of a lot of nothing but empty grandstanding is getting done.

And while the political hacks vie for air time on MSNBC and Fox News, a real compromise has been on the table this whole time, waiting for any major politician to take notice.

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WNYC News

Financial 411: Weekly Business Roundup

Friday, February 18, 2011

How do you make money at fashion week? Or the Westminster Kennel Club dog show? New Yorkers found ingenious ways this week of cashing in on the fancy shows.

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WNYC News

Chancellor Defends Pay-Back Policy on Schools' Rainy-Day Funds

Friday, February 18, 2011

New York City Schools Chancellor Cathie Black defended a new directive that reduces how much money schools can roll over from this school year into next year.

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WNYC News

Group in Crosshairs of Cuomo Budget Cuts Take to the Airwaves

Friday, February 18, 2011

There are just six weeks until the New York State budget is due, and groups affected by Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposed $10 billion in cuts have begun stepping up their efforts to win public support for alternatives — like extending a tax on the rich.

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Transportation Nation

NYT Poll Finds 22% Would Cut Transportation to Balance Budget

Monday, October 18, 2010

(Alex Goldmark, Transportation Nation) Buried deep within an excellent New York Times poll about the governor's race is a striking finding: 22% of New Yorkers would cut transportation to balance the budget. Given the choice of what to cut, transportation was the runaway choice over health care, and education.

This is the first time this question has been asked and there's a little unpacking to do here, so we called Marjorie Connelly, an Editor in the Survey Department of the New York Times.

"If you had to choose, which of the state funded services do you think should be cut, local education, higher education, health care, or transportation?"

There were no follow up  questions, or specific definitions about what constitutes "transportation." So, Connelly posits that for this survey, of which this was just one tiny part, when respondents hear transportation they aren't thinking roads and bridges so much as commuter trains. "I think people are hearing public transit. They are probably thinking subways, and perhaps Metro-North type trains."

A few extra correlations run by the NYT support this.  Connelly tells us they found that "the further you got away from New York City the more likely people were to pick transportation" as the area to cut. The less you use public transit the more you are likely to say cut it. That's logical.

Even in New York City, transportation was the plurality, but there's a gaping hole between New York City and upstate Downstate 38 percent chose transportation to cut, but upstate, far more people chose transportation to cut—58 percent of respondents.

No other factor seemed to predict who wants to cut transportation, not age, not race, not income, just location, a proxy for likelihood to use transit.

The answer might have changed if some sense of what the relative expenditures are for health care, education compared transportation. That would give a sense of which service is eating up most of the budget. If you are curious, New York State spends $4.3 billion on transportation compared to $14.2 billion on health, and $23.1 billion on local education not counting an additional $5.6 billion on higher education.  That doesn't Medicaid spending.

In the same poll, 51 percent of respondents support reducing pension benefits for future state employees, and 35% think its a good idea to lay off 5% of state employees to balance the budget.

Other budget categories that were not asked about are human/social services, mental hygiene, public safety,and environment, categories with spending levels closer to transportation. It would be interesting to see how transportation stacks up against an expanded list.

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