Streams

 

Budget

The Takeaway

Ryan Trying to Find His Groove in Budget Talks

Monday, March 11, 2013

The current divisions in Congress over the budget and the sequester drama may be another opportunity for Congressman Ryan to showcase his conservative cred. Does the number two from the Romney 2012 presidential campaign now want to be number one?

Comments [1]

WNYC News

New York Senate Republicans Push for Tax Breaks in Budget Negotiations

Monday, March 04, 2013

Senate Republicans are pushing for middle class tax breaks in the new state budget, including a return to the STAR property tax rebate checks curtailed in 2009.

Comment

WNYC News

City Projects $800M Sequester Hit

Monday, March 04, 2013

City officials are sizing up the impact of the federal government's sequestration cuts. At a city council hearing on the Mayor Bloomberg's preliminary budget proposal Monday, Mark Page, the director of the city's Office of Management and Budget, said the city faced a potential $800 million loss of funds.

Comment

Intelligence Squared US

Intelligence Squared US: Are the Rich Taxed Enough

Saturday, March 02, 2013

Broadcast Times: Saturday 6am, 93.9FM, Saturday 2pm on  AM 820 and Sunday, 8pm on AM 820

How do we fix the economy? The U.S. government's budget deficit is nearing a trillion dollars for the fourth straight year and unemployment remains high. With the Bush-era tax cuts that are set to expire at the end of 2012, what is the best move for continued economic recovery? Are the nation's wealthiest not paying their "fair share," or should tax breaks be extended for everyone in the name of job creation? The Panelists are Glenn Hubbard, Robert Reich, Arthur Laffer, and Mark Zandi.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Sequester Hits

Friday, March 01, 2013

Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate and author of The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War, talks about the sequester's dramatic impact on the military.

Comments [29]

Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The I'm Working from Home Gabfest

Friday, March 01, 2013

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring David Plotz, John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon. This week: The sequester gets real, SCOTUS weighs the Voting Rights Act and Slate employees work from home.

Comment

The Takeaway

One More Sign that Washington Can't Handle Money

Thursday, February 28, 2013

The budget wars seem never ending in Washington D.C., with the sequester just one day away and no agreement between the White House and Republican leadership in sight.

Comments [5]

The Brian Lehrer Show

NJ Budget; Sandy and the Netherlands; Sen. Murphy

Thursday, February 28, 2013

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has presented his budget. New Jersey Senate Republican Leader Thomas Kean Jr. and Gordon MacInnes, President of New Jersey Policy Perspective, react to the Governor’s proposals – including the expansion of Medicaid in the state. Then, a NY1 reporting trip to the Netherlands found lessons for storm mitigation for this area after Sandy. Plus: our series on fashion continues with a look at sustainability; U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.); leadership coach Dennis Kimbro tells the stories of black millionaires; and where do you draw the line with taboo foods?

WNYC News

Cuomo, Lawmakers Meet on Budget

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

With just about three weeks to go before a state budget deadline, Governor Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders met to assess how far they have to go to reach a deal. 

Comment

New Jersey News

NJ Governor Christie Proposes $32.9 Billion Budget

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie proposed a $32.9 billion budget Tuesday that allows more poor residents to enroll in Medicaid and increases public school aid but defers property tax rebates for three months to cover a projected budget shortfall.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Arthur Ashe; Bill Bradley; Sequestration Deadline

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

The deadline for a deal to avert automatic spending cuts from Washington is Friday, March 1. WNYC’s Bob Hennelly talks about what kinds of local services would see their budgets cut if no deal is reached. Then, former NY Knick and U.S. Senator Bill Bradley talks about Senate and New Jersey politics. Plus: remembering Arthur Ashe; and a series on idioms continues with phrases on animals.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Monday Morning Politics: Sequester Week

Monday, February 25, 2013

The automatic spending cuts known as the sequester kick in at the end of this week -- and the chances of a deal to avert them seem slim. Steven Dennis, White House correspondent for Roll Call, discusses the last-minute bargaining, the effects of the cuts, and the emerging blame-game in Washington.

Comments [22]

WNYC News

Cuomo's Budget Amendments Include Mandatory Teacher Evaluation Plan

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said he will make changes to his budget in what’s known as 30-day amendments. They cover a variety of areas, ranging from a teacher evaluation plan to cutting the cost of hunting licenses.

Comment

WNYC News

War of Words Over Cuomo Budget Analysis

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

An argument erupted between the Cuomo administration and the State Comptroller over the Governor’s budget plan, in a dispute that underscores existing tensions between the two.

Comment

The Takeaway

How President Obama and Congress Could Avoid Sequestration

Friday, February 08, 2013

If Congress and the President do not reach a spending deal by March 1st, budget cuts will automatically go into effect. Todd Zwillich explains the steps the president and Congress are taking to avoid sequestration.

Comments [2]

Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Drone On Gabfest

Friday, February 08, 2013

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon and special guest David Leonhardt, Washington bureau chief of The New York Times. This week: Obama's drone policy and his upcoming SOTU, plus Leonhardt's new eBook, Here's the Deal.

Comment

Transportation Nation

Connecticut Gov Wants Transpo Funding to Fill Budget Holes

Thursday, February 07, 2013

(Neena Satija -- CT Mirror) Coming from a supposedly "pro-transportation" governor, the proposed budget of Dannel Malloy has a lot of transportation advocates confused.

"It's hard to follow the dollars here," Joe McGee, of the Business Council of Fairfield County, said Wednesday afternoon.

"I work with these numbers all the time. I know these budgets. And I'm confused. What am I missing?"

On the one hand, Malloy's budget calls for a $1.26 billion special transportation fund for the coming fiscal year. Transit advocates have also been heartened by the work on the Hartford-to-New-Britain busway and the New Haven-Springfield high-speed rail line.

On the other hand, transportation -- like all other state services -- faces steep cuts as the administration tries to claw its way out of a several-hundred-million-dollar budget hole. And though next year's proposed spending is about $42 million above current levels, it falls $90 million shy of the level needed to maintain current services, according to nonpartisan legislative analysts.

Breakdown of state transit funds. (From 2013 report by state Office of Fiscal Analysis)

The special fund supporting Connecticut's highways, bridges and railways would be raided for non-transportation programs under Malloy's proposed budget, continuing a trend that began roughly a decade ago.

Two days earlier, Republican state Rep. Gail Lavielle of Wilton had suggested changing state law to convert the roughly $1.3 billion fund into a "lock box" that could not be used for other purposes.

"If you don't do something to make some structural changes to the budget to leave money to spend on transportation, I fear for the consequences," Lavielle said. "We have trains that are unsafe, we have bridges that are unsafe."

While campaigning for governor in 2009, Malloy promised to preserve the Special Transportation Fund. In 2011, he tried, shifting $30 million away from the general fund and into transportation.

But as state finances have fallen into deficit, things have swung the other way. About $70 million was taken from transportation and put into the general fund this year, and Malloy wants to take another $75 million next fiscal year.

"He has broken his promise regarding the transportation fund for the second budget in a row," one of Malloy's chief critics, Senate Minority Leader John McKinney, R-Fairfield, said Wednesday.

Car, bus commuters asked to give more

Malloy's budget also assumes a major increase in the wholesale tax on gasoline and other fuels signed into law in 2005 by Gov. M. Jodi Rell. As far as motorists are concerned, about 3.8 cents per gallon will be added to the price of gasoline starting July 1, and the state expects to collect an extra $32 million next fiscal year.

Malloy spokesman Andrew Doba responded to McKinney's charge Wednesday, saying, "Governor Malloy has proposed a robust investment agenda for our state's infrastructure projects, as inconvenient as that may be for the senator."

The transportation fund expects to close this year with a $159 million reserve that is projected to grow to $164 million next year.

"Most residents, at least those not running for governor, would think taking surplus funds and using them to address what would be painful cuts that would affect our most vulnerable, is just common sense," Doba said.

But those reserves apparently will not be used to offset other cuts that many say will hurt the state's poorest residents, as well as worsen its already crumbling infrastructure. Bus fares will jump under the proposal, and many commuters with disabilities will also be asked to pay more. The state's rail budget will be cut by $2 million, and expenditures on road maintenance for towns will be shifted to the state's credit card.

"Those have consequences," said Steve Higashide, of the advocacy group Tri-State Transportation Campaign. "It feels like few areas were spared in this budget, and transportation wasn't spared either."

Lavielle was also concerned that the rise in fares for bus riders and riders with disabilities were going toward filling in the state deficit, rather than improving the transportation system. She has proposed separate legislation that would prevent this.

"If you are collecting money off rail and bus fares, that money should be used for rail and for buses," she said. In recent years, the legislature has also raised fares for Metro-North riders, with the increase in revenue going toward the state's general fund rather than the rail system.

Ben Barnes, secretary of the state's Office of Policy and Management, said it was incorrect to assume that increases in bus fare would go toward services other than transportation. But nowhere in the proposed budget is that made clear.

"Is the money raised for transportation staying with transportation, or is it being used to cover part of the deficit? It's unclear to me," said McGee of the Business Council of Fairfield County.

A ride on the public bus costs $1.25 right now. Under Malloy's plan, it'll go up to $1.50 in 2014 and raise $4 million next year. For riders with disabilities that prevent them from riding regular public transit, they'll have to pay 4 percent more to ride what are known as paratransit vans provided for them under federal law.

Advocates say the fare increases will impact commuters who are already suffering.

McGee credited Malloy for continuing to focus some investment in transportation, but he questioned whether Connecticut has an overall comprehensive plan.

"We know he's committed to transportation. But it's confusing," McGee said. "[W]e are not clear exactly on what his intentions are."

Neena Satija also blogs over at CT Mirror’s Rant and Rail. Follow her on Twitter.

 

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Moving Past "Pro-Choice"

Friday, January 25, 2013

As Roe v. Wade turns 40 this week, hear about why Planned Parenthood has decided to abandon the term "pro-choice." Plus: New York State budget director Robert Megna on Governor Cuomo's proposed budget; CBS News foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward talks about reporting from Syria; and the impact of love on your overall health.

WNYC News

Minimum Wage Hike Stands Better Chance in 2013

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Governor Cuomo has proposed raising the minimum wage as part of his budget plan. That tactic might make it easier for the proposal to become law.

Comment

WNYC News

A Closer Look at Gov. Cuomo's Budget Proposal

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Money for longer school days, an increase in the minimum wage, and more revenue from gambling – these are among the ideas Governor Andrew Cuomo laid out when he detailed his proposed budget of nearly $137 billion Tuesday ($143 billion including federal aid for Sandy recovery). The governor is also calling for a new financing plan for some pensions.

Comment