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Brooke Gladstone

On The Media

Occupy Wall Street after Zuccotti Park

Friday, November 18, 2011

Much of the reporting on the eviction of occupiers from Zuccotti Park this week focused on what happens next -- can the movement survive without a physical location? Sasha Costanza-Chock is an MIT professor who has been studying the protests. He talks to Brooke about what the future holds for OWS and about how the protestors are organizing digitally in new ways.

Comments [3]

On The Media

The Art of Self-Surveillance

Friday, November 11, 2011

In 2002, artist and professor Hasan Elahi spent six months being interrogated off and on by the FBI as a suspected terrorist. In response to this experience, he created Tracking Transience, a website that makes his every move available to the FBI - and everybody else. Brooke talks to Elahi about the project.

 

Will Sessions - Halftime

Comments [2]

On The Media

Journalists are People Too

Friday, November 04, 2011

In the mainstream media, objectivity and care to avoid the appearance of bias are the ideal. But Jay Rosen, journalism professor at NYU and blogger at pressthink believes that accuracy and transparency are far more important than the appearance of objectivity. Brooke talks to Rosen about how public radio should handle the public political opinions of its employees.

Phillip Roebuck - "Rattleback Blues"

Comments [19]

On The Media

Website Tracks D.C. Homicides in Real Time

Friday, November 04, 2011

When Laura Amico launched the website Homicide Watch D.C., her intent was to create a comprehensive record of all the murders in the District. Little more than a year later, the site has become more than a somber document for posterity: it's a bona fide newsbreaker, often identifying victims before police do.

Comments [7]

On The Media

SuperPacs 2012: Off to the Races

Friday, November 04, 2011

This week the first series of pro-Rick Perry ads hit the airwaves from the SuperPAC "Make Us Great Again."  Brooke speaks to the Center for Public Integrity's iWatch News reporter Peter Stone about the way PACS are already making an impact in the 2012 race.

Comments [2]

On The Media

Audiences Returning to Network TV News

Friday, October 28, 2011

For years, network television news has seen a steady decline in viewership.  But new Nielsen ratings show an increase in audience numbers for the first time in a decade.  Brooke spoke to NewsLab Executive Director Deborah Potter about the new signs of life for network TV news.

Comments [8]

On The Media

The Government vs. the Freedom of Information Act

Friday, October 28, 2011

Currently, the government can avoid Freedom of Information Act requests in certain narrow circumstances by refusing to confirm or deny the existence of documents.  But new rules proposed by the Department of Justice would allow the government to lie to requesters, saying that documents don't exist even when they do. Brooke talks to Michael German, Policy Council for the American Civil Liberties Union, about this proposed rule change.

Smog - "Held"

Comments [2]

On The Media

New Variety on Network Evening News

Friday, October 28, 2011

One explanation that's been given for the increase in network news viewership is the variety of choices now available among the three major newscasts.  Brooke spoke with Andrew Tyndall, who monitors the nightly newscasts of ABC, NBC and CBS on the Tyndall Report website.  He says the days of the interchangeable newscast are over.

Ludwig van Beethoven - "Symphony No. 9 Mvt. 2, Scherzo"

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On The Media

Lack of Video on American TV News

Friday, October 28, 2011

Today, it is easier than ever to create and consume video, with billions of computers, TVs, and cell phones providing the world with access to the medium.  This should be good news for television news, but according to veteran TV journalist Dave Marash American TV news is actually using less and less video.  Brooke spoke with Marash about why American TV news is capping its lens.

Comments [2]

On The Media

Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything

Friday, October 07, 2011

A recent study from the University of California, San Diego says that, despite what we might expect, spoilers don't actually spoil our enjoyment of a story—at least not in books.  In fact, knowing the ending might even make us enjoy stories more.  Brooke spoke to Jonah Lehrer of Wired, who wrote about the study.

 

Music:

William Tyler - Tears and Saints

Comments [18]

On The Media

Teen Fiction Shies Away from Gay Characters

Friday, October 07, 2011

Writers Rachel Manija Brown and Sherwood Smith co-authored Stranger, a post-apocalyptic teen novel.  Despite the popularity of the genre, the authors say they can't find a publisher because one of the book's main characters is gay.  Brooke talks to Brown about the publishing industry's aversion to gay characters in teen fiction.

Comments [4]

It's A Free Country ®

Video Club: The Impasse was More Fun on The West Wing

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

Sometimes political truth is stranger than political fiction, but the fiction is always more fun.

For that reason, It's A Free Country brings you Video Club with Brian Lehrer, in which our veteran analyst looks at the fun-house mirrors of our government's (in)action: television and the silver screen. What did the writers get right, and where did they flop? Why were the fictional characters more sympathetic, or more detestable? How did the political theater play out in real life? More often than not, it's the reality that looks funny.

To launch our new club, Brian watches the budget debacle unfold on The West Wing Season Five in an episode called "Shutdown." Then, Brooke Gladstone, co-host and managing editor of WNYC's On the Media,  gives her take. You'll get a chance to weigh in as well. 

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It's A Free Country ®

The Mix: Shaky Ground

Friday, March 11, 2011

It's A Free Country's The Mix, where we take some of the notable clips and other voices found on WNYC this week and mix 'em up. Voices are in bold, connections in italics.

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The Empire

Former journo: Olbermann flap is 'about pretending that the media is objective'

Friday, November 05, 2010

Brooke Gladstone underscores an interesting detail about Keith Olbermann: his donations to three Democratic candidates apparently violates a policy of NBC, the less-partisan parent company of MSNBC, which is decidedly more partisan and outspoken.

Word that a partisan news host played an actively role in politics is, according to journalist-turned-consultant Bob Liff, more about the industry's failings than a transgression of a reporter.

Liff, a former reporter with Newsday and the Daily News, said the flap about Olbermann "is not about the objectivity of the media but about pretending that the media is objective."

"If journalistic means you have to hide your opinion, is that honest to a reader or a viewer?," Liff asked. "Knowing Olbermann's bias is better than not knowing it. And pretending that media folks do not have opinions is dishonest.

"Olbermann and his ilk, including the [Sean] Hannity's of the world, are not reporters but commentators and opinion-spewers at their core. They are supposed to be opinionated. That's why people watch them," Liff said.

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Features

Billy Wilder's Ace in the Hole

Friday, April 09, 2010

Billy Wilder's Ace in the Hole was meant to be a seamy saga of journalism at its worst.  But of course, journalism is more complicated than that. It wouldn’t exist without its audience.

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WNYC News

If Brian Lehrer is Spock and Leonard Lopate is McCoy, Who is Brooke Gladstone?

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Brian Lehrer and Brooke Gladstone discuss the new Star Trek movie and ask listeners what Star Trek means to them.

Comments [1]