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Brazil

New Sounds

Mystics and the Mediterranean (Podcast Edition)

Friday, August 05, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll sample liberally from the latest recording from Moroccan-born singer Amina Alaoui, called “Arco Iris.”  It’s a pan-Mediterranean blend of flamenco music from Spain, fado music from Portugal, Arab-Andalusian music and Brazilian choro, linked by jazz and a night in Tunisia.

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Spinning on Air

Elomar

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Elomar is a Brazilian singer and composer born in 1937. Elomar has created a unique approach to song, drawing on folk, classical, and ancient troubadour traditions. Host David Garland presents an introduction to Elomar's music.

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New Sounds

Mystics and the Mediterranean

Friday, July 08, 2011

For this New Sounds, we’ll sample liberally from the latest recording from Moroccan-born singer Amina Alaoui, called “Arco Iris.”  It’s a pan-Mediterranean blend of flamenco music from Spain, fado music from Portugal, Arab-Andalusian music and Brazilian choro, linked by jazz and a night in Tunisia. 

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Japan, Egypt, AT&T

Monday, March 21, 2011

Operation Odyssey Dawn began Saturday with coalition missiles targeting Moammar Gadhafi's tanks and air defenses. Is the United States leading this effort? Meanwhile, relief and rescue efforts continue in Japan and time is of the essence as over 12,000 people are still missing and 8,000 have been confirmed dead so far. 

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The Takeaway

President Obama Travels to Latin America

Friday, March 18, 2011

While the world watches the events unfolding in Japan and the Middle East, President Obama heads to Latin America for a five day tour. The president and first lady Michelle Obama begin their first official trip to Brazil tomorrow, a country with a fast-rising GDP rate that some economic experts have taken to calling "The New World Player." The president and first lady will also stop in Chile and El Salvador.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Business in Brazil

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

As part of a series on New Yorkers doing business with BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), Robert Wood, Latin America Senior Analyst for the Economist Intelligence Unit, gives a close-up of the Brazilian economy and what it's like for American businesses working in Brazil. Also, Robert Kartheiser, partner of the Project Finance group at Allen & Overy LLP, on operating from Sao Paulo.

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The Takeaway

Brazil Responds to Massive Flooding

Monday, January 17, 2011

Floods in mountain towns north of Rio de Janeiro have killed at least 600 people, and weather forecasters say more rain is on the way. The death toll has risen steadily as rescuers reach remote areas and unearth corpses from mounds of debris. As Brazilians wait for the water to recede, authorities fear the spread of disease through contaminated water. Brazil’s civil defense agency has distributed vaccines against tetanus and diphtheria, according to its website.

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The Takeaway

Heavy Rains, Flooding Hit Brazil

Friday, January 14, 2011

More than five hundred people have been killed by flooding and mudslides in southeastern Brazil. Authorities have sent nearly a thousand rescue workers to the region. The floods have affected poorer rural residents, who live in houses built in risky areas. BBC Brazil correspondent, Paulo Cabral, reports from Brazil on the flooding and the dramatic rescue efforts.

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Features

Gig Alert: Scott Kettner's Forró Brass Band

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Scott Kettner brings his Forró Brass Band to Barbès tonight with a Louisiana-meets-Brazil sonic mashup and many, many horn players. Download a live performance of the band's "Crown Heights Boogie" here.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: DC Metro Has Bicycle Ambitions, NJ Transit Delays Increase, and Ford To Recycle Blue Jeans

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

The DC Metro wants to triple the percentage of riders who arrive by bicycle by 2020 and quintuple it by 2030. (Greater Greater Washington)  Meanwhile, WAMU explains how Metro's track circuits work--and what happens when they don't.

Does California's largest high-speed rail project suffer from the "absence of a credible financial plan"? That's a criticism in the first report released by the California High-Speed Rail Peer Review Group. (San Jose Mercury News)

Things are...not great on NJ Transit's Northeast Corridor line. "Since July, the railroad's on-time percentage has been lower than the previous year's in every month except November." And this is after a 25% fare hike last May. (Wall Street Journal)

Dallas's Green Line--a 28-mile rail line--is open for business. (Dallas Morning News)

The head of a NYC taxi drivers' union is suggesting that cabbies racially profile passengers. "It's our own committing these crimes against us. It's weeding out the criminal element." (NY Post)

Starting today, Santa Rosa County (Florida) begins its first foray into public transportation--a one-year trial for a bus system aimed at helping people get to and from work more easily. (Pensacola News Journal)

The U.S. State Department agreed to the framework for an open-skies aviation deal with Brazil, a move that would liberalize one of the most restrictive international airline pacts in Latin America by October 2015. (Wall Street Journal)

Ford will use recycled blue jeans for the interior of the Focus. (Alt Transport)

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The Takeaway

Brazil Elects First Female President

Monday, November 01, 2010

Dilma Rouseff has become the first woman to be elected as president of Brazil. A former Marxist guerrilla who was imprisoned and tortured during Brazil's long dictatorship, Rousseff said her first priority would be the eradication of poverty in the country. Her election is seen as a major victor for Brazil's popular incumbent president, Lula Da Silva. Rousseff served as da Silva's chief of staff. She has never before held elected office. The BBC's Rogehrio Simoyes reports.

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New Sounds

Global Dance Music

Monday, October 18, 2010

Dance music from West Africa, from Southen Africa, from India and beyond awaits you on this New Sounds.  Hear something new from Femi Kuti (son of Fela), and something from banjo player Bela Fleck's "Throw Down Your Heart," recorded on the island of Madagascar.  Quite possibly there might also be Balkan brass band music from Goran Bregovic, and a bit of Angolan music by way of Brazil.

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Soundcheck

No Cover: Hermeto Pascoal

Monday, October 11, 2010

Multi-instrumentalist Hermeto Pascoal, at 74-years young, is a legendary and wildly experimental jazz musician beloved throughout his native Brazil. He recently played Lincoln Center Out Of Doors.

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Features

Lichtenstein and Torres García Paintings Head Back to Brazil

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Somehow, illegally traded art often finds its way to the Big Apple. But this week, the US Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York began to move some smuggled art works out of New York City.

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Features

Little Brazil Gets Psyched Up for Brazilian Day

Saturday, September 04, 2010

On a normal day, 46th Street, which is marked with a small "Little Brazil Street" sign, looks like any other midtown side street. But on Sunday, 1.5 million people are expected to descend on the 25 blocks surrounding 46th Street for the annual celebration of Brazilian Independence Day, which falls a day later on September 7th.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro

Monday, August 30, 2010

Janice Perlman's 1969 book The Myth of Marginality was the first in-depth account of life in Rio’s favela. She carries that story forward in her new book Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro by re-interviewing many longtime favela residents whom she had first met in 1969—as well as their children and grandchildren—to reveal the effects of violence, drugs, poverty, and unemployment.

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Features

Brazil Honors 'Girl from Ipanema' Writer

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Brazil has posthumously given the rank of ambassador to a poet and songwriter who penned the famous Bossa Nova anthem, "Girl from Ipanema."

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The Takeaway

Soccer on US Soil: Recapping Brazil vs. USA

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

When you play Brazil, you are expected to lose. At least in soccer anyway.

Last night the U.S. Men's National Team took on the five-time world champions for the first showcase of international soccer on our soil since the World Cup. For the U.S. team it was something of a victory lap for their impressive finish in South Africa. Coach Bob Bradley filled his roster with familiar faces instead of testing out new talent. Brazil, on the other hand, used the occasion to debut an overhauled squad, keeping just four players from their last World Cup team. A new trio of youngsters, Neymar, Alexandre Peto and Ganso, passed their first test with ease.

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Azi Paybarah

Maybe Lula and Assad Just Like Each Other

Friday, July 02, 2010

WNYC

In a video I posted earlier, Bruce Blakeman argued that America's allies were meeting with leaders from rogue nations in more frequency under Obama than they were under Bush--signaling America was losing it's strength in international diplomacy.

"The president of Brazil met with the President of Syria. Assad. Bashar Assad. I cannot think that if George Bush was still president, that the President of Brazil would meet with the Syrian president. I cannot imagine a scenario where that would happen," Blakeman said.

A reader points out that, in fact, Brazil's President, Lula da Silva, already met with Syria's president...in 2003.

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Gallerina

Datebook: June 24, 2010

Thursday, June 24, 2010

WNYC

Vintage Brazilian portraits, the explosive landscapes of an Ohio-born painter and a collection of heroin baggies as art. Your guide to what's happening now.

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