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Bradley Manning

The Brian Lehrer Show

Transgender Identity and the Military

Friday, August 23, 2013

Chelsea Manning (born Bradley Manning), the U.S. Army Private who was convicted of leaking classified government documents, said in a statement yesterday that she wants to live the rest of her life as a female and hopes to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible. Michael Silverman, Executive Director of the Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund, joins us to talk about the challenges Manning will face as a transgender military inmate and how Manning's gender identity factored into her legal defense. 

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Gabfest Radio

The Best First Line Ever Edition

Friday, August 02, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon are joined by special guest Todd Purdum, contributing editor for Vanity Fair and senior writer at Politico. They discuss the Bradley Manning verdict and the latest news about Edward Snowden and the NSA. Then, they discuss how the Justice Department plans to regain its oversight of Texas election law after the Supreme Court’s June ruling on the Voting Rights Act.

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On The Media

A Busy Week In the Security State

Friday, August 02, 2013

This week saw the conviction of Bradley Manning, congressional hearings on intelligence, and more stories broken from the leaks of Edward Snowden to The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald. Bob reflects on the public perception of government surveillance programs, the threats journalists face, and more.

Stateless - Miles to Go

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The Takeaway

Manning Verdict Echoes Pentagon Papers Call for First Amendment Rights

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Yesterday, a military judge found Pvt. Bradley Manning not guilty of “aiding the enemy” for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified military documents to WikiLeaks. Amidst the mix of rumblings and applause that followed the verdict were the echoes of another case: the 1971 Pentagon Papers. Floyd Abrams defended The New York Times in that case, and joins The Takeaway to discuss the impact of yesterday's ruling on the freedom of the press and the First Amendment.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bradley Manning Verdict

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Bradley Manning was convicted of violating the Espionage Act, but found not guilty of "aiding the enemy" for supplying classified information to Wikileaks. Arun Rath, reporter for Frontline and PRI's The World and new host of NPR's Weekend All Things Considered, and Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate and author of The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War (Simon & Schuster, 2013), discuss the verdict, and what it means for the military, transparency, and journalism.

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WNYC News

Interview: How Will the Manning Verdict Affect Journalists?

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Army Private Bradley Manning was acquitted of the most serious charge against him, that of aiding the enemy. That charge worried many national security journalists, who felt a guilty verdict could've affected their work.

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The Takeaway

Bradley Manning Verdict: Not Guilty of Aiding Enemy

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Army Private Bradley Manning, who leaked thousands of classified Iraq and Afghanistan war logs to WikiLeaks, was found not guilty of aiding the enemy on Tuesday, the largest charge he faced in military court. He was, however, convicted of at least 15 other charges, including 5 charges of espionage. The private had pleaded guilty to 10 criminal counts in connection with the leak to WikiLeaks. Joining us to discuss the verdict is Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University's School of Law, and Ed Pilkington, reporter for The Guardian..

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WNYC News

Bradley Manning Convicted of 5 Espionage Counts - But Not Aiding the Enemy

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

US Army Pfc Bradley Manning was acquitted of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Check-In: Bradley Manning Trial and Guantanamo Hunger Strike

Thursday, July 11, 2013

We're watching two stories related to national security and counter-terrorism efforts. Arun Rath, reporter for "Frontline" and PRI's "The World" discusses the trail of Wikileaks leaker Bradley Manning, and the ongoing hunger strike (and force-feeding of prisoners) at Guantanamo.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Bradley Manning Trial

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Ed Pilkington talks about the court-martial trial of PFC. Bradley Manning, accused of leaking sensitive information to WikiLeaks. Pilkington is chief correspondent on the trial for the Guardian, and one of the few journalists to attend nearly every pre-trial hearing. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Measuring Intelligence; Comedian Trevor Noah; Deciphering an Ancient Code; Bradley Manning Trial

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman on why the ways we measure intelligence in children often fails to predict adult success. South African comedian Trevor Noah talks about his new one-man off-Broadway show “Born a Crime,” about growing up in Apartheid South Africa as a mixed-race child. We’ll find out why it took scholars 50 years to break a code that enabled them to read Europe’s earliest written records. Plus, we’ll get the latest on the Bradley Manning trial.

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Big Leaks

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate and author of The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War, and Steve Coll, contributor to the New Yorker, incoming dean of the Columbia Journalism School, and author most recently of Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power, discuss the Espionage Act and its application in the AP/Fox News Justice Department investigations and in the case of Bradley Manning, who is currently on trial. 

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The Takeaway

Pushing for More Transparency in Bradley Manning Trial

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

More than three years after his arrest and after months and months of pretrial hearings, the trial of Army Private Bradley Manning finally began this week at Fort Meade. But his trial is shrouded in secrecy.  Motions, briefs, and transcripts of pre-trial hearings have not been released, making it hard for the press and public to follow the proceedings. Shayana Kadidal, Senior Managing Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights is among those pushing for greater transparency in this trial.

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On The Media

A Warning to Whistleblowers

Friday, March 15, 2013

Bradley Manning still faces the charge of 'aiding the enemy.' Though that charge can carry the death penalty, the government has said it won't seek it. Brooke spoke with Harvard Law Professor Yochai Benkler who says that a conviction on that charge would still set a chilling precedent for future whistleblowers. 

 

Modest Mouse - Gravity Rides Everything

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On The Media

Bradley Manning and 'Aiding the Enemy'

Friday, March 15, 2013

Late last month, Bradley Manning pled guilty to 10 of the 22 charges against him for leaking a trove of information to WikiLeaks. He did not plead guilty to 'aiding the enemy,' a capital offense. Brooke talks to University of Chicago law professor Geoffrey Stone about the validity of the 'aiding the enemy' charge.

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On The Media

Covering the Manning Trial

Friday, March 15, 2013

Coverage of the Manning trial has been inconsistent at best - in part due to a lack of press interest, and in part because the government is making this story difficult to report. Brooke talks to Arun Rath, a reporter for PBS's Frontline and PRI’s The World, who says that few members are actually there following the pre-trial minutiae at Fort Meade. When they are, he says, they’re not in the courtroom, but in the press room.

 

Rahim Alhaj - Dance of the Palms

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The Takeaway

Glenn Greenwald on America's Two-Tiered Justice System

Thursday, July 05, 2012

High-profile cases, where the punishment doesn't seem to fit the crime, are part of what Glenn Greenwald calls America's two-tiered justice system. That's the focus of his book, now out in paperback, "With Liberty and Justice for Some." 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bradley Manning: Hero or Traitor?

Monday, April 16, 2012

Chase Madar, civil rights attorney and author of the new book The Passion of Bradley Manning, discusses the Army soldier who revealed the content of classified documents through WikiLeaks. 

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The Takeaway

UN Special Rapportuer: Solitary Confinement is Cruel and Unusual Punishment

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

The Eighth Amendment declares that "cruel and unusual punishment" may not be inflicted on prisoners. But does solitary confinement constitute cruel and unusual punishment? In a new report looking at the imprisonment of Bradley Manning, the soldier suspected of leaking confidential military documents to the whistleblowing website Wikileaks, the UN Special Rapporteuer on Torture, Juan Mendez, says that it does. Having just completed a 14-month investigation, Mendez concludes that keeping Manning locked up alone for 23 hours a day over an 11-month period might have constituted torture and has formally accused the U.S. government of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment towards Bradley Manning. 

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The Takeaway

Closing Arguments in Pre-Trial for Wikileaks Suspect Bradley Manning

Thursday, December 22, 2011

A seven day pre-trial that closes Thursday will determine if Army Pvt. Bradley Manning, a suspect in leaking confidential military and diplomatic intelligence, faces a court-martial. Manning's defense lawyers claim that the Army's computer security was lacking and a faulty chain of command. Meanwhile, his prosecutors have brought 21 witnesses to the stand in the hopes of establishing traitorous intent.

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