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Transportation Nation

Boston Epicenter of Occupy Transit's Day of Protest as MBTA Approves Fare Hike

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

Members of the public at Wednesday's MBTA meeting (photo by J. Platt via twitter)

The tweets are coming fast and furious.

Boston's MBTA Board just voted for a fare increase that takes effect July 1. Unluckily for that body, today's board meeting coincides  with national protests (referred to as a National Day of Action for Mass Transit) proposed by Occupy Boston. It's the date on which Martin Luther King Jr. -- himself a transit activist -- was assassinated.

Occupy MBTA tweeted: "SHAME! Board member just said 'we are transportation agency, not a social service agency.'" @AceEJ tweeted: "Disabled rider tells #MBTA bd: Someday you're going to need THE RIDE & I hope it's there 4 u! Transit is a right, not a privilege! Cheers!" And Boston Metro reporter Steven Annear wrote: "Second Board member interrupted by crowd chanting "Just Vote NO"

At the end of the two hour-plus meeting, members voted 4-1 in favor of the fare hikes of about 23%.

Boston's transit system is facing a $161 million budget gap.

Boston Globe reporter Eric Moskowitz tweeted that just getting into the meeting involved "3 checkpoints, (and) 1st-come-1st-served ticketing" -- not to mention passing by a large poster displaying the rules of order.

The MBTA was probably taking no chances. Last week, members of a Boston transit riders coalition commandeered an MBTA committee meeting while wearing superhero costumes -- causing official business to grind to a halt.

 

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Transpo Legislation Stalled, Boston T Eyeing Fare Hike, FedEx Driver Saw Linsanity Coming

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Top stories on TN:
NYPD Defends Role in Investigating Traffic Deaths (Link)
NYPD Issued Almost 50,000 Bicycle Tickets in 2011 (Link)
Transit Tax Deduction Amendment Doesn’t Make Payroll Deal (Link)
Final Irene-Damaged Road in New York is Fixed (Link)
SF Ferries Prepare for Crunch From Bridge Closure (Link)
New York Wants $2 Billion From Feds for Tappan Zee Bridge (Link)
Report: Boehner is Delaying Transpo Vote (Link)

Boston T sign in Cambridge (photo by Kate Hinds)

Why is transportation legislation stalled in both the House and the Senate? TN's Todd Zwillich explains on The Takeaway.

Ray LaHood says President Obama's transportation spending plan is necessary, because "America is one big pothole right now." (Los Angeles Times)

BP's oil slick is spilling into a New Orleans courtroom: testimony in a lawsuit over the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe is scheduled to begin at the end of the month. (NPR)

Boston's transit advisory board is proposing a 25 percent, across-the-board fare hike as an alternative to steep service cuts. (Boston Globe)

Detroit's mayor will propose ending bus service between 1 and 4 a.m. citywide and reducing service times and lengthen waits between buses on dozens of routes. (Detroit Free Press)

DC's Metro and three equipment makers have admitted liability in the deadliest train crash in the transit authority’s history, according to court filings. (Washington Post)

Toyota has revved up its sales to U.S. rental car agencies. (Marketplace)

West Virginia's House is mulling Complete Streets legislation. (AP via West Virginia Gazette)

If the global climate continues its warming trend, Manhattan could see a drastic uptick of so-called 100-year floods, or those with storm surges around 6.5 feet, according to a new MIT study. (Atlantic Cities)

How dreamy is Boeing's new Dreamliner? One passenger: "It's half-and-half. I half like it, and I'm half disappointed." (Wall Street Journal)

A FedEx driver -- and statistics hobbyist -- predicted the rise of Jeremy Lin two years ago. (Wall Street Journal)

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: FAA Funding Agreement Reached; Tappan Zee Bridge Tolls' Worst Case Scenario; MTA, Union Resume Talks

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Top stories on TN: NYC held its first bicycle station community planning workshop. How the stimulus revived the electric car. One academic says NJ Governor Chris Christie’s hiring recommendations at the Port Authority far outpace his predecessor’s patronage hires. House Republicans rolled out parts of a $260 billion transportation infrastructure bill. President Obama dropped by the DC auto show. Karachi has the most beautiful buses in the world.  And: the history of Critical Mass rides.

Tappan Zee Bridge (photo by icadrews via flickr)

Lawmakers say they've reached an agreement on a $63 billion, four-year bill to extend the Federal Aviation Administration's operating authority and the agency's air traffic modernization effort. (AP via NPR)

The U.S. DOT is making $500 million available for a fourth round of TIGER grant funding. (DOT)

Engineers and transportation wonks are crunching numbers for the $5.2 billion Tappan Zee Bridge project to see what drivers might pay if toll revenue alone funds it. Worst-case scenario: $30 tolls by 2022, up from the current $5. (Crain's New York Business)

New York's MTA and the transit workers union will resume contract talks tomorrow. (Wall Street Journal)

Security video in the NYC death of cyclist Mathieu Lefevre differs from the description in the police report. (Streetsblog, New York Times)

The Motor City loses one of its rarest breeds: a woman car executive. (Forbes)

Florida Congressman John Mica needs to decide what district he'll run in. (Orlando Sentinel)

Boston's transit system set a modern ridership record in 2011 -- but those numbers will almost surely dip this year, as the T considers fare increases and service cuts. (Boston Globe)

General Motors’ bankruptcy unit has agreed to pay nearly $24 million to resolve environmental liabilities at Superfund sites in New Jersey, Maryland and Missouri. (Star-Ledger)

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said a Congressional Budget Office report that the highway trust fund would be empty by fiscal year 2014 shows President Obama has been right to call for increased funding for transportation projects. (The Hill)
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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Boston T Sets Ridership Record, Auto Sales Up, San Francisco Embraces Car Sharing

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Top stories on TN:

See who is lobbying and donating to influential members of Congress. (Link)

California's high-speed rail costs soar, but proponents say there's 'no choice' but to build. (Link)

The Senate approved an austere transportation spending bill (link), as well as $15 million for a trans-Hudson tunnel with an uncertain future (link).

Boston T (photo by Michael Kappel via Flickr)

Boston's T set a ridership record. (Boston Globe)

Car sales are up for the big three -- as well as most foreign automakers. (Detroit Free Press)

Congressman John Mica said the federal government will honor its $300 million commitment to the Second Avenue Subway. (DNA Info, Second Avenue Sagas)

And: Mica is meeting with Wall Street investors today to talk about investing in high-speed rail on the Northeast Corridor. (Bloomberg Businessweek)

TN's Andrea Bernstein talks infrastructure and jobs bill on The Takeaway.

Florida Governor Rick Scott experiences schadenfreude over new estimates for the cost of California's high-speed rail program. (The Hill)

NYC is rethinking putting neon stickers on cars that violate alternate side parking rules. (Wall Street Journal)

The head of the NJ DOT says the ARC tunnel was flawed from the start. (Asbury Park Press)

San Francisco is ground zero for the car-sharing movement. (USA Today)

From water bottle to bridge: one company is making infrastructure out of recycled plastic. (Fast Company)

And: Beethoven Awareness Month even affects skateboarders! Vide0 here.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Senate to Look At Rail Terror Threat -- LA May KO Traffic Cams -- Discord Within OPEC

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Los Angeles traffic camera (photo by stevelyon/Flickr)

After a surprising commission vote, Los Angeles's red light traffic cameras may be on the way out. (Los Angeles Times)

The Senate will hold a hearing on terror threats to rail next week. (The Hill)

Richard Florida writes about the financial benefits of living in a transit-friendly neighborhood. (The Atlantic)

The UK's top ten cycle theft hotspots are laid bare in The Guardian.

Boston's aging T trains need $100 million in work immediately in order to keep them running. (Boston Globe)

There's discord within OPEC as members fail to agree on raising oil production levels. (New York Times)

San Francisco OKs parking permits for nannies. (AP via Mercury News)

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Transportation Nation

Sales of Small Cars Boosting US Auto Industry, Boston's Transit Is Booming, Melbourne's Bike Share Is Not

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Watching "Manhattanhenge" on East 42nd Street (photo by Kate Hinds)

Sales of small, fuel-efficient cars are revitalizing the American auto industry. (New York Times)

Meanwhile, Democrats try to use that industry's recovery as political leverage. (Wall Street Journal)

Is the Sacramento Kings' new arena putting a long-planned downtown transit center at risk? (Sacramento Bee)

A NY Times editorial lambastes NJ Governor Christie for withdrawing the state from a greenhouse gas emission reduction program. (Previous TN/WNYC coverage can be found here and here.)

Development is following New England's future high-speed rail line. (AP via NECN)

Ridership on Boston's transit system climbed last month to its highest number since September 2008. (Boston Globe)

A mostly empty bus system in Central Indiana seems to indicate that until the state is prepared to invest in mass transit that will offer residents a viable alternative to their cars, even some of the most avid transit supporters will stay away. (Indianapolis Star)

Theories abound as to why Melbourne's year-old bike share program is underperforming -- maybe it's due to bad weather, the roads, or the relatively few (50) stations. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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In case you missed it on Transportation Nation:

--Panasonic moved to Newark to be near transit (link)

-- car-free Central Park not happening anytime soon (link)

-- a survey of pedestrians seeks to quantify why walkers walk (link)

-- a profile of the MTA board member engaged to Sir Paul McCartney (link)

-- NYC subway ridership is up (link)

-- DC tries to get a handle on excessively wordy Metro station names (link)

-- higher gas prices didn't deter Californians or Floridians from leaving town on Memorial Day

-- TN's Alex Goldmark talked about mapping bike ticketing on the BL Show (link)

-- why did NJ Governor Christie exit the 10-state cap-and-trade program? (link)

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